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July 22, 1953 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, MY "22, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1"AGE

.EDE-AYJUY-2, -31PAE TU-

Lemon,

Cleveland Stop

Yankees, 8-3

F I.ASSIFIE

* * *

* " *

* * *

FOR SALE

PERSONAL

Brooldyn Pounds Helpless Cubs, 15-4;
Braves, Phillies Divide Double Header

GENE WOODLING, Yankee outfielder, is forced at second in the second inning of the first game
of the July 19 doubleheader in Chicago. A crowd of over 54,000 saw the Yanks take two from the
second place White Sox. Shortstop Chico Carrasquel gets throw off to first in vain attempt to
catch batter Irv Noren, who had tapped to Nellie Fox.
TITLE HOPES BRIGHT:
Miehigan Looks to Banner Grid Season
(FrtI eie ntecmn .

(First in a series on the coming
football season)
By IVAN N. KAYE
It may be' a bit premature to
think of football at a time when
the mercury is bursting thermo-
meters across the nation, but the
crisp days of autumn are not far
off, aid activity on the gridiron
is just around the seasonal corner.
The approaching season could
be the best for Michigan since the
undefeated campaign of 1948.
Bennie Oosterbaan, who begins
his sixth year as head football
coach ad twenfy-fifth in the em-
ploy of the university, finds ex-
perienced men at all positions ex-
cept quarterback and linebacker.
. * *
* HERE THE graduation of block-
ing back Ted Topor and defensive
performers Roger Zatkoff and
Laurie LeClaire presents the most
s serious threat to the team's
chances of weathering a difficult
nine game schedule.
Sophomore Lou Baldacci may
hold the answer to the quarter-
back problem., The six foot, 200
pounder from Akron, Ohio, is
being groomed to take over the
signal calling position. He also
backs up the line on defense,
and in this capacity will be
teamed with Dean Ludwig. Al-
though both have shown excep-
tional promise in spring prac-
tice, neither has experience.
".? The remainder of the personnel
picture is extremely bright. Let-
termen abound on all sides. For
the first time in several years
there is real depth on the varsity.
This depth in talent, always a
mark of superior teams, will come
in handy during the last three
' weeks of the season when Illinois,
Michigan State and Ohio State
must be' faced on successive Sat-
' urdays. Each of these teams de-
feated Michigan last year.
GIANT GENE KNUTSON of Be-
oit, Wisconsin, now in his senior
year, will head an experienced
group of ends which also includes
Bob Topp, Tad Stanford, Jim
Bates, George Dutter and John
Veselenak.
Line coach Jack Blott has
veteran tackles Art Walker, Jim
Ending Tonight
RIDE VAGUERO
ROBERT TAYLOR
AVA GARDNER
THURSDAY
THE STORY OF A
MAN OF PASOIONS U
.) KIRK OULA

Balog, Herb Geyer and Dick
Strozewski, and guards Dick Bel-
son, Don Dugger, Ron Williams
and Captain Dick O'Shaughnes-
sy around whom to build the
Michigan forward wall.
At center it will be Ludwig play-
ing first string, with Anm Arbor
boys John Morrow and Don Drake
on hand to .lend reserve strength.
* * *
THE BACKFIELD will probably
consist of Baldacci at quarterback,
Ted Kress and Tony Branoff at,
the halfback posts, and Dick Bal
zhiser at fullback.
There is great depth in the
backfield, with Bill McKiAley,
Duncan McDonald and Ray Ke-
naga all''battling Baldacci for
the quarterback position.
Baseball star Dan Cline and
sophomore Tom Hendricks will
back up Kress at the vital tail-
back spot, while defensive ace
Stan Knickerbocker and speedy
Ed Hiokey add insurance to Bran-
off's right halfback position.
* * *
BOB HURLEY and Fred Baer,
a couple of hustling fullback as-
pirants, should give Balzhiser some
good competition for the starting
berth.
The new rule change outlaw-
ing free substitution is expected
to raise problems at many
schools, but Michigan is not one
of them.
It has been a long-standing po-
licy among the coaches to train
the players in both the offensive
and defensive phases of the game.
This policy has now proved its
worth in the light of the rule
change adopted by the N.C.A.A.
last -winter.
* * *
THE ONLY important player
switch necessitated by the new
rule involves the moving of Cap-
tain O'Shaughnessy from the cen-
ter post he held for two years to
right guard. The change was
made because Dean Ludwig fits
into the defensive picture as a
linebacker, whereas O'Shaughnes-
sy could not play that position.
O'Shaughnessy spent the six
week spring drill learning the
W-M-- -

fundamentals of his new posi-
tion, and seemed to have mas-
tered them by the end of fthe
practice. Coach Blott will put in
a good deal of time on the Mi-
chigan captain before the sea-
son begins. After the first few
games, the coaches should be
able to tell whether O'Shaugh-
nessy fits into the one-platoon
system at right .guard.
The team appears much strong-
er than last year's squad, and it
should be noted here that last
year's Michigan team came with-
in one game of winning the Big
Ten championship.
(Tomorrow: The Opposition)
Ben Hogan Named
To Hall of Fame
NEW YORK-(/P)-To add to
his many honors yesterday, Ben
Hogan was named the 13th mem-
ber in Golf's Hall of Fame.
The announcement was made
by the Hall of Fame Committee
after the triple crown winner from
Fort Worth, Tex., was given a tick-
ertape reception by New York City
for his recent British Open tri-
umph.
* * *
HOGAN WON his second Mast-
ers Tournament and his fourth
U. S. Open earlier this year.
In the hall of fame he joins
Robert Jones Jr., Walter Hagen,
Francis Ouimet, Gene Sarazen,
Willie Anderson, Tommy Ar-
mour, Jim Barnes, Chick Evans,
Jock Hutchison, Johnny McDer-
mott, Alex Smith and Jerome
Travis.
Grantland Rice is chairman of
the Hall of Fame Committee.
Later in a ceremony at Golf
House, home of the U. S. Golf
Association, Hogan presented the
ball with which he played the last
three holes at Carnoustie to the
golf museum.

By The Associated Press
The Cleveland Indians battered
three New York Yankee pitchers
for 13 hits, including a homer by
Al Rosen, to pound out an 8-3
verdict over the league leaders.
The Tribe's performance gave
mound ace Bob Lemon his 13th
triumph of the season. The eight
runs represented the most by
Cleveland against the Yanks this
season.
* * *
THE NEW YORK defeat en-
abled the rained out, second place
Chicago White Sox to pick up a
half game on the pace-setters.
The "Go Go Sox," who almos
went after dropping a double
header to New York on Sunday,
now trail by 5%/2 games.
The last time the Yankees
visited Municipal Stadium, they
were riding the crest of a twelve
game winning streak, and took
the Indians four times in a row.
TherNational League leaders,
the Brooklyn Dodgers, pounded
six Chicago Cub pitchers for 18
hits and a 15-4 triumph. All but
two of the 12 players used by
Brooklyn hit safely and scored as
the Dodgers walloped four homers,
a triple and two doubles among
their assortment of base hits. The
Bums also swiped four bases, three
by Jackie Robinson.
* * *
DUKE SNIDER opened the'
Dodger scoring in the first inning
by slamming his 17th four-bagger
off starting and losing pitcher
Waritn Hacker. Hodges led off
the second with his 21st round-
tripper. Pee Wee Reese his ninth
in the seventh, and Bobby Morgan
belted his second in the eighth.
Rookie Glen Mickens made
his first big league start and it
was not a howling success. The
22 year old right hander was
replaced by - Ben Wade after
yielding all of Chicago's runs
and six of the Cubs' eight hits
in four innings.
Robin Roberts won his 16th
game of the season last night as
he pitched the third place Phila-
delphia Phillies to a 10-0. victory
over the runner-up Milwaukee
Braves. It was the first game in a
twilight-night double header in
the city of brotherly love.
* * *
ROBERTS scattered seven hits,
while the Phillies pounded out 16
safeties, including Willie Jones'
fourth inning home run with one
man on base. Roberts struck out
six, and contributed a seventh
inning single which drove in two
runs.
The Braves came back to win
the nightcap however on the
strength of home runs off the
bats of Ed Mathews and Walker
Cooper. Mathews' wallop was
his 29th of the year, while
Cooper got number one with
two mates aboard to pace the
Braves to a 7-3 decision.
The split cost each team one
half game to the league-leading
Dodgers, who pasted the Cubs.
The Braves now trail by 4/.
* * *
AGING Ken Raffensberger, the
35 year old pin-point control artist

of the Cincinnati Redlegs, subdued
the. last place Pittsburgh Pirates,,
7-2 in a contest held at Forbes
Field last night.
Raffensberger scattered 10 hits
and blasted a three-run homer
himself to send Rogers Horns-
by's team to victory.
The Redlegs shelled Jim Waugh
off the mound with a five-run
barrage in the second to hand the
19 year old rookie right hander
his second straight defeat. Raf-
fensberger fanned six and did not
issue a single walk.
* * *
DON LUND, former star athlete
at the University of Michigan,
broke up the Detroit-Washington
game yesterday with a two-run
double in the tenth inning to give
the Tigers a hard fought 8-7 vic-
tory over the Senators.
The St. Louis Cardinals scor-
ed four runs in the first inning
last night and coasted to a 10-6
victory over the New York
Giants.
Stan Musial and Rip Repulski
smacked round-trippers for the
Redbirds, and veteran Gerry Sta-
ley notched his 13th success of
the season.
13 Lion Stars
Fail To Sign

'53

Contracts

As of yesterday afternoon, 13
players on the Detroit Lions were
still unsigned to their 1953 con-
tracts.
Some of the outstanding stars
who helped the Lions to the cham-
pionship of professional football
last fall are still debating the
salary question with General Man-
ager Nick Kerbawy.
* * * ,
CLOYCE BOX and Leon Hart,
the team's star offensive ends, and
tackle Gus Cifelli aleng with back-
field stars Pat Harder, Bob Hoern-
schmeyer and Jug Girard are all
waiting for better salary offers
from the Lions' front office.
The holdouts are not all of-
fensive performers. Defensive
stars like Jim Doran, Jack
Christiansen, Thurman McGraw,
John Prchlik, Les Bingaman
and Laverne Torgeson are also
still among the missing.
The players will have until to-
morrow night to sign their con-
tracts or miss the first workout
for the world champions on Fri-
day. No player can join in the
practice without first signing his
1953 contract.
* * *
DICK STANFEL, one of the out-
standing first year men last sea-
son, signed pis contract yester-
day. Coach Buddy Parker is count-
ing on Stanfel for some top level
'football this autumn.
Stanfel was a former Univer-
Oity of, San Francisco star and
weighs 235 pounds.
Rumors have been flying to the
effect that the holdouts may be
traded, but a look at the impos-
ing list should indicate that the
Lions are not in a position to lose
those men unless they also wish
to lose most of their games this
season.
I-M SOFTBALL
Chemistry "B" 15, Psychol-
ogy 9
Hinsdale 13, W.R.R.C. Jokers 0
U. H. Doctors 10, Fletcher 8
Phi Delta Phi 10, W.R.R.C.
Digits 4

The victory moved the Cardinals
into fourth place ahead of the
Giants, who lost only their third
in their last 14 games. Musial
connected for his 12th home run
of the season with one aboard in
the big first and Repulski drove
out his ninth with two on base in
the Cardinals' four-run fourt.
Of the Giants' 11 hits, Bobby
Thomson's 16th home run was the
only extra-base blow.
Cardinal second baseman Red
Shoendienst, the National League's
leading batter, was hit by a ball
thrown by New York shortstop Al
Dark, but there was no serious in-
jury, and Shoendienst is expected
to be in the lineup today.
Hogan Passes
'Up Tamn Golf
Tournament
CHICAGO - (P) - Imagine a
golf tournament billed as the
"world championship" without
Ben Hogan.
About the only person who can
stretch his imagination that far
is George S. Mayspromoter of the
$120,000 extravaganza at Tam
O'Shanter.
MAY'S BLUE plate golf specials
for men and women, both profes-
sional and amateur, will start with
the All American Tournament
July 30-Aug. 2 and will be cli-
maxed by the "world champion-'
ship of golf" Aug. 6-9.
The "world" meet, a 72-
hole gold rush over Tam's exact-
ing 6,700 yards, carries the rich-
est playoff in golf-a purse of
$75,000 for men pros. The win-
ner's share is $25,000 and sec-
ond place is worth $10,000.
The prospect of'striking this bo-
nanza has drawn about all of the
game's big names except Hogan,
winner of the 1953's most cher-
ished titles, the National and Brit-
ish Opens and the Masters.
"WE HAVEN'T tried to get in
touch with Hogan and he hasn't
contacted us," said May. "The
money is there, let him come and
play for it. There will be no guar-
antees offered by me to get him."
Hogan said in New York yes-
terday that his next tournament
will be the 1954 Masters.
"In 1951," said May, "I paid
Hogan $15,000 appearance money
to get him at Tam O'Shanter. He
won the 'world' championship
which, that year, was good for
$12,500.
* * *
"IF HE WANTS to try for the
$25,000 top prize this time, he's
welcome to it. But I won't make
him a guarantee. Why should I
when there's that big a prize at
stake?"
"Of course we would like to have
Ben. But when one man can be-
come such a dominating factor
that a whole tournament's suc-
cess rests on his appearance, then
I'll quit and all of golf may as
well, too."
GOLFERS
Have fun at the
Partridge Practice Range
We furnish clubs and balls
-2/2 miles out Washte-
nw -- right on U.S. 23
for 1 mile.

SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1.39
Skip-dents, sanforized, whites and
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington St.
SMALL walnut gateleg table $40. One
large oak sideboard $5.00. One large
double-coil springs $15.00. One up-
holstered chair $1.00. One large wal-
nut veneer table and five chairs $25.
One wool rug $65. Two large walnut
veneer buffets. $15 each. One small
folding steel cot $10.00. Large daven-
port with green leatherette, $15. Two
doll high chairs, $2.50 each. Phone
2-9020.
MONTMORENCY CHERRIES-Pick your
own. Small trees. 8 a.m. to dark
dally. Bring containers. Bowen Or-
chards, 2160 Newport Rd.
TEN-WATT Amplifier and 2-way speak-
er in 7.5 cu. ft. reflex cabinet. $62.00.
Ph. 6943 Poindexter, 615 Oswego.
CANARIES and Parakeets.. Bird supplies
and cages. 526 S. Seventh at W. Mad-
ison
FOR SALE-1948 4-door English Austin.
Good tires and body, rebuilt motor.
An excellent, economical car. Call
2-6520 after 6:00.
CAMERAS - Imported precision type
just back from Japan. Also a few
Japanese Lelcas and reflex types pric-
ed to sell. Call San Schafitz at 2-2107
after 5 p.m.
MODEL A-Excellent condition. Looks
and runs like new. R. Johnston, 1015
E. Huron.
FOR RENT
APARTMENTS, roomettes, or rooms by
day or week for campus visitors.
Campus Tourist Homes, 518 E. Wil-
liam St. Phone 3-8454.
DELUXE Bachelor Apt. Private entrance.
Semi-private bath. Between Ypsi and
Ann Arbor. $67.50 a month. Ph. 2-9020.
SMALL furnished apartment Sept. 1 by
couple in Graduate School. Quiet
home. 1410 Hess, Lansing, Mich.

LONELY GRAD STUDENT interested in
literature, music, philosophy and base-
ball, would like to meet female inter-
ested in same. Prefers Proust, Bartok,
Stephen Potter and Yogi Berra. .Pur-
pose: conversation and good clean fun.
Write Alc-iblades, 807 South State St.
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Taxi cab drivers, full or part
time. Yellow and Checker Cab Co.
113 S. Ashley. Ph. 9382.
IDEAL year-round job available for one
or two students. Full time' summers,
part time winters. Some skill in
painting, carpentry, and mechanica
required. Good sales personality es-
sential. Phone 2-2887 evenings or
weekends.
BUSINESS SERVICES
RADIOS-- PHONOS
New and used and all guaranteed.
Phono needles - portable batteries.
We repair all types of radios, phono,
and T. V.
Summer Special
Phono Jack and switch installed free
in your radio with purchase of VM.
Triomatic Changer Attachment.
ANN ARBOR RADIO & TV
"Student Service"
1215 So.dUniv., Ph. 7942
I% blocks east of East ng.
WASHING, Finished Work, and Rand
Ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing.- Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up ad de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Ph. 7590. 830 8. Main,
REAL ESTATE
HOMESITES--On Huron River Dr., d
mi. west Ann Arbor in hilly, wooded
area overlooking Huron River. Write
Frank Offer, 1710 Seaborn, Detroit 14,
Phone Lorain 7-1495.
$1,000 EASY
CAMPUS AGENT WANTED
We are looking for an agent to
sell nationally advertised drawing
instruments to entering freshmen
this fall. Very high commissions.
Write
SLS. MGR. EMPIRE
ENGINEERING SUPPLY CO*
P.O. Box 114
Canal Street Station
New York City 13, N.Y.

BOARD for men students. Private home.
Good food. On campus. 1319 Hill.

-

ROOM AND BOARD

READ AND USE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

TONIGHT THRU SAT.

8:00 P.M.

Dept. of Speech Presents
Odets' New Thriller
THE COUNTRY GIRL
"eOdets ... has gone straight to the heart of three characters
in a vivid and stinging play, and written about them with
pitiless integrity."
-BROOKS ATKINSON

$1.20 --90e -- 60e
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

SAVE AT SAM'S STORE__
~uitn el' iaff44t94

4

I

Major League Standings

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Seersucker
Short Sleeve
Sport Shirts
X139
" SANFORIZED
* ASSORTED
SOLID COLORS
AND WHITE

New
Chica
Cleve
Bosto
Wash
Phila
St. L
Detro

AMERICAN
W
York 61
ago 56
eland 51
on 52
hington 43
delphia 35
ouis 33
)it 29

LEAGUE
L Pct.
28 .685
34 .622
38 .573
39 .571
48 .473
54 .393
59 .359
60 .326

GB
5
1013
10
19
26
291/
32

NATIONAL
W
Brooklyn 57
Milwaukee 53
Philadelphia 49
St. Louis 49
New York 46
Cincinnati 41
Chicago 31
Pittsburgh 291

LEAGUE
L Pct.
32 .640
36 .596
38 .563
40 .551
39 .541
49 .456
55 .360
66 .305

GB
. ...
4
7
8
9
161/
241/
31

11

OPEN EVERY
10 A.M. - 11

DAY
P.M.

NOW!

'Courage. Treachery. .. and Love
-AND THE GREAT
EVERGLADES INDIAN WARS!

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 8, New York 3
Detroit 8, Washington 7 (10 inn.)
Boston at Chicago (rain)
Philadelphia at St. Louis (rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
Washington at Detroit
Boston at Chicago
Philadelphia at St. Louis (night)
New York at Cleveland (night)

YESTERDAY'S' RESULTS
Brooklyn 15, Chicago 4
Philadelphia 10-3, Milwaukee{
Cincinnati 7, Pittsburgh 2
St. Louis 111, New York 6
TODAY'S GAMES
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh
St. Louis at New York
Chicago at Brooklyn (night)
Milwaukee at Philadelphia
(night)

0-71

Cinma SL juiI4
PLEASE NOTE SHOW TIMES EACH NIGHT
THURSDAY & FRIDAY AT 7:00 & 9:15 P.M.

HENRY
FONDA

OLIVIA
DeHAVILLAND

I

JACK
CARSON

MEN'S CASUAL CANVAS
OXFORDS
" SPONGE RUBBER SOLES
* BROWN - BLUE

I wwwd

ETALTE

STARTING
SATURDAY

in James Thurber's Famed Broadway Comedy
"THE MALE ANIMAL"
"Monstrously amusing . . . See 'The Male Animal' if you are
interested in one of the funniest sights extant"-New York Times
ALSO!
OUR ANNUAL SUMMER
TECHNICOLOR CARTOON FESTIVAL
Donald Bugs I Mouse I Porky Pluto
Duck Bunny | Mickey | Pig & Goofy
ALL NEW - FIRST CINEMA GUILD SHOWING

FADED BLUE DENIM$ !
LACE AND SLIP-ON
CASUAL CANVAS OXFORDS

i

L '

I

II

IFA 14 .__:

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2I Until You've Seen Tlhis Mus~ticl Miracles * ' .. > .. ;:

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