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July 15, 1953 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-15

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

I m2f

N ationa League
Successive A

Garnzers

ho urth

CLASSLFIEDS
HELP WANTED

1t ag r

Verdict,

5-1

, * ,}

* s S

C

* * *

ENOS SLAUGHTER
... .the old pro

Senior Circuit Hurlers Limit
Junior Leaguers to Five Hits
By The Associated Press
CINCINNATI-Enos Slaughter and Pee Wee Reese, a pair of old
hands at all-star games, led the National League to its expeced fourth
straight over Casey Stengel's American Leaguers yesterday, 5-1, as
four pitchers teamed up for a five-hitter.
The muscular men of the National failed to batter down any
fences, but they beat the American Leaguers to death with a steady
patter of singles. Reese's double in the seventh was the only extra
base hit of the game, watched by a capacity crowd of 30,846 at Cros-
ley Field and millions more on television.
* * * *
SHUT OUT UNTIL the ninth when they got to Murry Dickson
for one run on three hits, the Americans never were in the ball game
after the fifth when a two-run burst broke Vpen a scoreless tie.
Thus Stengel, all-winning manager of four straight Ameri-
can League pennants and four successive world series, lost his
fourth all-star game in a row. While his hitters were falling
weakly before the National pitchers, Stengel must have been
strongly tempted to call on Capt. Ted Williams, the hero of so
many all-star games who was sitting on he bench as an honorary
squad member, waiting to be detached from the Marines.
Slaughter, playing his 10th all-star-game at the age of 37, came
through with the defensive play of the day, a diving catch on pinch-
hitter Harvey Kuenn of Detroit in the sixth. Earlier he had walked
and scored the second National run in the fifth. The old country boy
singled, stole second and came home with another run in the seventh
and drove in another run with an eighth-inning single.
REESE, HITLESS IN 13 at bats in eight previous all-star games,
broke his slump with a single and the double in the Nationals' 10-hit
attack on four American League pichers.
It was a scoreless battle for four innings until the Nationals
climbed on New York's Allie Reynolds in the fifth. Ed Mathews
of Milwaukee started it when he was hit on the foot by a pitched
ball. This brought Stengel steaming from the dugout in protest
but Umpire Bill McKinley's ruling stood.
With two gone, Reynolds walked Slaughter. It was the first time
either club had two men on base in an inning. Philadelphia's Richie
Ashburn, batting for Milwaukee's Warren Spahn, bounced a pinch
single into center, scoring Mathews with the first run.
* * * *
REESE THEN REACHED out to punch an outside pitch into
right field for a hit that brought Slaughter roaring around third to
score.
That was more than enough to win, the way the National
pitchers were going. Philadelphia's Robin Roberts, who started,
worked three scoreless innings against Chicago's Billy Pierce,
each allowing only one hit. Spahn, the eventual winner, didn't
give up a hit in two innings.
Curt Simmons, second Philadelphia pitcher used by National
Manager Chuck Dressen of Brooklyn, yielded only one hit in two inn-
ings. So it was a two-hitter going into the ninth when the Americans
broke the shutout with three singles off Pittsburgh's Murry Dickson.
DESPITE THE National's domination of this series since 1950,
the American League still holds a 12-8 edge after 20 games. The last
American victory was at Brooklyn in 1949.
Stengel's tiny lefthanded pitcher, Pierce, breezed past
the Nationals like a charm. It was the right-handers who ran
into trouble. Reynolds and St. Louis' old Satch Paige gave up two
runs each and Cleveland's Mike Garcia one.
In the seventh, Slaughter, who never seems to run out of energy,
singled and slid head first into second for a stolen base under Chico
Carrasquel's attempted tag. Reese slammed the ball to left-center,
beating Minnie Minoso's throw to second for a two-bagger.
Paige, master of the hesitation pitch, gave up the last two
runs in the eighth to the delight of the crowd. He threw up
slow stuff, slower stuff and then almost bounced the ball to the
plate. Roy Campanella, who knew Satch in the old Negro leagues,
waited for his pitch and bounced a single past the box to center.
It was Campy's first all-star hit in 17 trips.
Satch walked pinch-hitter Duke Snider of Brooklyn after he had
retired two hitters. Slaughter followed Campanella's system of at-
tack, timing his swing to a soft pitch to send a bounding single past
the box into center, scoring Campanella. Dickson followed with
another single that brought home Snider.
* * * *

ALLIE REYNOLDS
.. . charged with loss

MICHIGAN DAILY
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FOR SALE
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1.39.
Skip-dents, Sanforized, whites and
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122 East
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SMALL walnut gateleg table $40. One
large oak sideboard $5.00. One large
double-coil springs $15.00. One up-
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One wool rug $75. One metal doll
house, partially furnished, $5. Two
large walnutaveneer buffets, $15 each.
One small folding steel cot $10.00.
Large davenport with green leather-
ette, $15. Phone 2-9020.
PORTABLE Record Player - 3-speed,
manual, $30. Phil Kearney, 2-6674
after 6
RETURNING HOME-Must sell '47 Nash.
good condition. New tires. Call at 614
Monroe, back apt.
SELLING OUT-Leaving city. $400 new
couch, Thor washer and ironer, Frigi-
daire range, 10" television, chaise
,lounge, lawn chair, bedroom suite,
crib, radio, dinette,, drapes, lamps,
bookcase, misc. 3-3158.
PARAKEETS make delightful inexpen-
sive pets. Easily trained to talk, whis-
tle, or do tricks. Bird supplies also.
Mrs. Ruffins, 562 S. Seventh.
FOR RENT
APARTMENTS, roomettes, or rooms by
day or week for campus visitors.
Campus Tourist Homes, 518 E. Wil-
liam St. Phone 3-8454.
PERSONAL
LONELY HEART-Am lonely; want to
be taken to Beach Ball, boy-bid dance
to be held in League Ball Room, July
25. Josephine.
TRANSPORTATION
LEAVING for the West about July 25.
Can take two passengers. Call 3-2155
for information.

WANTED-Taxi cab drivers, full or part
time. Yellow and Checker- Cab Co.
113 S. Ashley. Ph. 9382.
BUSINESS SERVICES
RADIOS-PHONOS
New and used and all guaranteed.
Phono needles - portable batteries.
We repair all types of radios, phonos,
and T. V.
Summer Special
Phono Jack and switch installed free
in your radio with purchase of V.M.
TriomnaticChanger Attachment.
A.NN ARBOR RADIO & TV
"Student Sarvice"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
11 ,blocks east ofEast Eng.
WASHING, Finished Work, and Rand
Ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Ph. 7590. 836 S. Main.
MISCELLANEOUS
IF ENROLLED in summer school, teach-
ers are entitled to special student sub-
scription rate. For information, phone
Student Periodical, 6007.
MONTMORENCY CHERRIES-Pick your
own. Small tees. 8 a.m. to dark
daily. Bring containers. Bowen Or-
chards, 2160 Newport Rd.
READ AND USE
DA I LY CLASSIF I EDS

U

GOLFERS
Hove fun at the
Partridge Practice Range
We furnish clubs and balls
--21/2 miles out Washte-
now - right on U.S. 23
for 1 mile.
OPEN EVERY DAY
10OA.M.-11 P.M.

PEE WEE REESE
... crucial hits
BASEBALL CHATTER:

ROBIN ROBERTS
. . . three scoreless innings

SATCHEL PAIGE
. ..finishes up
* * *j
INNING BY INNING:

FERRIS FAIN
... lone AL marker
* * *

All-Star Game Frolics:
A Three-Ring Circus

Play-by-Play Summary
Of 20th All-Star Classic

CINCINNATI - (P) - It hap-
pened at the All-Star game...
Bill Veeck, owner of the St. Louis
Browns, sitting in a stay-up-late
spot, telling the boys, "I'll bet
Hornsby gets more money for not
managing the Browns this year
than he gets for managing Cin-
cinnati." Willie is still paying off
on his old contract to the Rajah
f+ -r-
ALLIE REYNOLDS making like
a state department attache while
explaining what happened when
the players put their demands be-
fore American League owners .. .
Joe 'Cronin recalling Dave
(Boo) Ferriss in the midst of
all the talk about the Giants'
hot shot rookie, Allan Worth-
ington. Ferris also pitched shut-
outs in his first big league starts.
"You know Ferriss could throw
as hard with his left hand as
his right," said Cronin. "Only he
was a big bashful kid and he
didn't want to show off
One day he was fooling around,
warming up and Bill Summers,
the umpire was watching. Bill
came over to me and said 'is that
Ferriss? I didn't know he was a
lefthander.' That's how natural he
was throwing lefty." Where's Fer-
riss now? A pitcher-coach down in
Louisville on a Red Sox farm.
JOHNNY VANDERMEER had
just thrilled the nation with two
consecutive no-hitters when they
played the last All-Star game at
Crosley Field in 1938 .. . Johnny
was the starting and winning
pitcher that day ... Now he's a
manager of the Cincinnati farm
at Burlington, Ia., in the Three
Eye league ...
NOW!

Shortstop Joe Cronin, second
baseman Charlie Gehringer and
first baseman Hank Greenberg
of the American League '38 club
all are back as general managers
of the Boston Red Sox, Detroit
and Cleveland ... Bill Terry and
Joe McCarthy were the manag-
ers that day 15 years ago ...
The All-Star game and World
Series are carried on radio and tel-
evsision under the terms of the
old contract Happy Chandler en-
gineered in 1951 . . .the contract
runs through 1956 . . . radio pays
$35,000 and TV $75,000 for the
All-Star. The Series radio fee this
fall is $175,000 and TV $925,000
. . . all the dough goes into the
player pension fund-...
TED WILLIAMS' appearance re-
vived memories for fans of his
tremendous performances in the
1941 and 1946 games . . at De-
troit in '41 he hit a homer off
ClaudePasseau with two on and
two out in the last of the ninth
for a 7-5 victory . . . at Fenway
Park in '46 he hit two homers and
a single and drove in five runs in
a 12-0 route . . . one homer came
on a Rip Sewell blopper pitch ...
Bob Lemon is sure Cleveland
will get straightened out -again
as soon as Bobby Avila and Dale
Mitchell are back in the linedp
Steve O'Neill hoping Karl Drews,
a 1953 disappointment, can help
out Robin Roberts, Curt Simmons
and Jim Konstanty in the last
half drive ... O'Neill thinks it's a
five-team race in the National with
Cincinnati also troublesome at
home. . . *
Line Score
American 000 000 001-1 5 0
National 000 020 12x-5 10 0
Pierce, Reynolds 4, Garcia 6,
Paige 8 and Berra;' Roberts,
Spahn 4, Simmons 6, Dickson 8
and Campenalla. W-Spahn, L-
Reynolds.
I-M SCORES
Wolverines 12, Pharmacology 4
Chemistry B 10, Digits 8
Social Psychology 12, Eco-
nomics 11
WR Jokers 7, Hospital Med-
ics 6

AMERICAN FIRST - Goodman
walked. Vernon flied to right. Baer
fanned. Goodman was out stealing,
Camnpanella to Reese.
Nothing across.
NATIONAL FIRST-'-Rosen threw out
Reese. Schoendienst flied to right.
Musial lined a single to center.:
Kluszewski fouled out to Berra.
No runs, one hit, no errors, one
left.
. AMERICAN SECOND - Roberts
pounced on Mantle's drag bunt and
threw him out at first. Rosen flied to
left. Zernial lined a single to left.
Berra flied to center.
No runs, one hit, no errors, one left.
NATIONAL SECOND - Rosen tossed
out Campanella. Goodmanthrew out
Mathews. Bell flied to Zernial, who
made a one-handed catch in left
field.
Nothing across.
AMERICAN THIRD - Carresquel
fouled to Campanella. Pierce fanned,
and Campanella threw him out at
first. Goodman lifted to center.
Nothing across.
NATIONAL THIRD - Slaughter
popped to third. Kiner batter for
Roberts and fanned. Reese bounced
to Rosen.
Nothing across.
AMERICAN FOURTH -- Spahn
pitching for the National League.
Vernon was called out on strikes.
Bauer fouled to Musial in left. Man-
tle walked. Rosen flied to center.
.No runs, no hits, no errors, one left.
NATIONAL FOURTH - Reynolds
pitching for the American League.
Schoendienst fied to right. Musial
lined to short. Kluszewski went out,
Vernon unassisted.
Liothing across.
AMERICAN FIFTH - Zernial was
called out on strikes. Berra and Car-
resquel rolled out to second.
Nothing across.
NATIONAL FIFTH-Minoso playing
left field for the AL. Campanella
fouled to Rosen. Mathews was hit
by a pitched ball. Berra and Stengel
disputed the call, but to no avail.
Bell popped to second. Slaughter
walked. Ashburn, batting for Spahn,
hit a ground single to center field,
Mathews scoring and Slaughter stop-
ping at second. Reese singled to right,
Slaughter scoring and Ashburn
stopping at second. Schoendienst
flied deep to Bauer.
Two runsttwo hits, no errors, two
left.

hit into a double play, Carresquel to
Vernon.x
No runs, two hits, no errors, one
left.
AMERICAN SEVENTH - Hodges
playing first base, Williams playing
second base for NL. Bauer walked.
Mantle forced Bauer, Reese to Wil-
liams. Hunter ran for Mantle. Rosen
fouled out to Berra. Minoso dumped
a single into right, Hunter reaching
third. Berra flied to center.
No runs, one hit, no errors, two
left.
NATIONAL- SEVENTH-Doby play-
ing center field, Fain first base for
American League. Attendance: 30,846.
Bell went out, Garcia to Fain. Slaught-
er beat out a hit to deep short.
Slaughter stole second. J. Robinson,
batting for Simmons, popped to
Fain. Reese doubled to left-center,
scoring Slaughter. Williams walked.
Musial fanned.
One run, two hits, no errors, two
left.
NATIONAL EIGHTH - Paige pitch-
ing, Rizzuto playing shortstop for AL.
resquel and filed to Musial in left.
E. Robinson batted for Garcia and
filed to right. Fox also flied to right.
Nothing across.
National Eighth-Paige pitching,
Rizzuto playing shortstop for AL.
Hodges flied deep to Doby. Campa-
nella grounded a single into cen-
ter field. Mathews popped to Riz-
zuto. Snider batted for Bell and
walked. Slaughter singled to cen-
ter, Campanella scoring and Snider
moving to third. Dickson singled to
left-center, scoring Snider with
Slaughter moving to third, but when
Dickson tried to take second he was
thrown out Doby to Rosen to Fox.
Two runs, two hits, no errors, one
left.
AMERICAN NINTH-Hamner play-
ing shorttSnider center for NL. Fain
singled to left. Mize, batting for
Bauer, singled to center, Fain stopping
at second. Doby flied to center, Fain
going to third after the catch. Rosen
foulde to Hodges. Minoso singled to
center on the first pitch, Fain scoring
and Mize stopping at second. Berra
popped to Williams.
On run, three hits, no errors, two
left.

CAMERAS FOR RENT
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also 8mm and 16mm PROJECTORS
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at
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DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
NEXT PLAY NEXT WED.
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THEOU Y GIR
"Best play of Odets' Career" - N. Y. Times
JULY 22-25 ... 8:00 P.M.
$1.20- 90c - 60c
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

'I,
N

HENRY H.
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LONG <:Y",r>>;;: :..
DISTANCE
MOVING
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Phone Flint Manager
or Lower
nterstate Rates.
We own, operate and schedule our own fleet of vans
for direct service without transfer.

F
1

FURY-
FILLED '".i;.i:"i; 'iiii: t:: ;r i
STORY .
OF THE ~.
SOUTH SEAS!
&0r

I"

Be On Time
* WATCH REPAIRING
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t GOOD SERVICE

RICHIE ASHBURN
...,bats in initial tally
bMW

A) 7C> <)-'g~ ) ) CG CG C O ~ )

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