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July 04, 1953 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-07-04

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SATURDAY, JULY 4, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIMER

PAGE TWrE

I

I.

Avalanche of Golf Upsets Signal
'Black Friday'in PGATourney
BIRMINGHAM, Mich.-(T)-Defending champion Jim Turnesa,? Bobby Locke. Jimmy DeMaret and Johnny Bulla, among others, were,
heavily favored Sam Snead, and a whole regiment of golf's brightest blown out of the tournament.
names were buried yesterday in an avalanche of upsets marking the , M
darkest "black Friday" in PGA tournament history. TURNESA, AFTER PLAYING brilliant sub-par golf to win a 6
Other victims of the carnage at the Birmingham Country Club to 4 victory Friday over Max Evans in the first round, couldn't main-
were the low medalist, Johnny Palmer: four other former champions tain the pace and bowed in an afternoon joust to Felice Torza of St,
in addition to Snead, and the red-hot tournament co-favorite, Dr. Charles, Ill., 4 and 3. Torza beat Sarazen, 2 and 1 in the morning
Cary Middlecoff. round.
Middlecoff, the gangling Memphis dentist who is one of the
THE EX-TITLISTS shu tled to the sidelines in a dizzying succes- game's top money winners, took a terrific shellacking in the see-
sioi of surprises were 51-year-old Gene Sarazen, the three-time win- and round from Jimmy Clark, from Laguna Beach, Calif., 5 and 4.
ner; Vic Ghezzi, Jim Ferrier and Chandler Harper. They were joined Clark beat Ghezzi, 1941 champion and first round qualifying lead-
by Chick Harbert, twice a runnerup; Ed (Porky) Oliver, and one of er in the morning, 2 and 1.
the sport's toughest little competitors, George Fazio. As the boys counted heads after the long day of double-barreled
Emerging as the shining star of the day's almost unbelievable 18-hole eliminations, the 32-year-old Clark and Douglas were the
onlyrprominenthtouringnprosaleftfinhtheanondescriptufieldeofb16
developments was Dave Douglas, stringbean son of a Scot profes- only prominent touring pros left in the nondescript field of 16.
sional, who eliminated former open champion Lew Worsham and THE STANDOUT SURVIVORS include Claude Harmon, of Main-
Snead in two bitter overtime duels. aroneck, N. Y.; Ed Furgol of St. Louis, and Bill Nary, a 38-year-old
The 35-year-old Douglas from Newark, Del., first put out Wor- occasional campaigner from Kansas City.
sham, 1947 U. S. Open king, on the 20th hole of the morning round. Harmon was just about the most torrid shooter on the prem-
* * * * ises of the 6,465-yard, par 71 Birmingham course. He was eight
THEN HE STAGED a spectacular rally to collar Snead on the under par for his brace of victories over Ted Kroll, 4 and 2, and
16th hole and then whip the strong favorite by sinking a six-foot Jack Grout, by the dame margin.
birdie putt on the first extra hole of their overtime match. It was Grout, a rangy Texan now serving the famous Scioto
Old-time followers of professional golf called it the biggest club in Columbus, O., who ousted Palmer, of Badin, N. C., in a morn-
blowup in the history of the tournament, surpassing the storm of ing round, 2 and 1. Just the day before Palmer had equalled the
upsets at Plum Hollow in 1947 when the well-worked but still . tournament's 36-hole qualifying record with 134.
appropriate phrase "black Friday" was born. Ferrier, 1947 champion, lost to Furgol, the slender pro whose left
On that day defending champion Ben Hogan, favorite Snead, arm was left shi'iveled by a childhood ailment, 3 and 2.

_

GRACIOUS SEIXAS-Philadelphia's Vic Seixas, who captained
the 1953 Davis Cup team, sails over net at Wimbledon, England
Wednesday after defeating Australian, Mervyn Rose in a five-set
semi-final in the All-England lawn tennis championships. Seixas
won, 6-4, 10-12, 9-11, 6-4, and 6-3. Seixas went on to defeat Den-
mark's Kurt Nielsen in the finals.
CHAMPS RETAIN BIG BULGE:

CLASSIFIEDS
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS Roomettes and Apartments by
Phone 23-24-1 day or week for campus visitors. --
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M. Campus Tourist Homes, 518 E. Wil-
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING liam. Phone 3-84x4.
RATES PERSONAL
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS SUMMER STUDENTS-Plan your own
2 .60 1.34 1.96 course of piano lessons with fine pri-
3 .70 1.78 2.84 vate teacher; brush-up series for ed
4 .90 2.24 3.92 ucation students; fundamentals for
Figure 5 overage words to a line, beginners; repertoire and technique
CFied deadgie wordsta iep for the advanced pianist. Ph. 2-3541.
Classified deadline doily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays, A VISITING LECTURER from England
is interested in exchanging accorr,-
11 :30A.M., for Sunday issue. nodations of a cottage 10 miles from
- Oxford or a flat in London and a tsar
FOR SAL E for similar facilities in Ann Arbor.
Sept., 1953 to June, 1954. Anyone
'53 VOLKSWAGEN - German peoples' interested should call 3-1511, Ext. 531.
car, $150 below cost. '48 English I
Thames, small panel truck, $200 total. HELP WANTED
Ph. European Products 2-9780
PA hA E u ope $ a n P r d $ .c s , 2 - s -8 0W A N T E D - T a x i c a b d riv e r s , fu ll o r p a r t
PARAKEETS $6 and $8. Canaries-fe- time. Yellow and Checker Cab Co.
males and undetermined sex $1.95 113 S. Ashley. Ph. 9382.
Singers $7.95 and up. Mrs. Ruffins,
562 S. Seventh. BUSINESS SERVICES
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1.39.
Skip-dents, sanforized, whites and RAD IOJ - ----PHONOS,
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122 East New and used and all guaranteed.
Washington St. Phono needles - portable batteries.
SMALL walnut gateleg table $40. One aWedrepa all types of radios, phonos, T. V.
large oak sideboard $5.00. One large
double-coil springs $15.00. One up- Summer Special
holstered chair $1.75. One large wal- Phono Jack and switch installed free
nut veneer table and five chairs $25. in your radio with purchase of V.M.
One wool rug $75. One metal doll Triomatic Changer Attachment.
house, partially furnished, $5. Two ANN ARBOR RADIO & TV
large walnut veneer buffets, $15 each. A SudAtBrvic&T
One small folding steelcot $10.00. 1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
Large davenport with green leather- 1? blocks east of East Eng.
ette, $15. Phone 2-9020. ___ b___ k__________E____Eng.
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
FOR RENT ' Ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
LARGE, COOL double rooms and one ing separately. Free pick-up and de--
single room available for male stu- livery. Phone 2-9020.
dents in house 5 minutes from cam-
pus. Ice box privileges. Call 3-0849. HOME TYPING SERVICE-Reasonable
rates. Call Mrs. Conner, 2-7605.
HOME on Whitmore Lake for month of
August. Call Whitmore Lake 2835. TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
ROOMS FOR RENT and efficient. Ph. 7590. $30 S. Main.
EXPERT TYPIST - Rates reasonable.
ROOM FOR MEN-With full kitchen Prompt service. 914 Mary Street.
privileges. Two blocks from campus. 3-4449.
Call 3-8066, 12 to 1 or 5 to 7. 411 E.
William. MISCELLANEOUS
LARGE, clean double rooms for men ALTERATIONS ladies garments. Prompt
students. Fall. Ph. 3-1873. service. Ph. 2-2678 mornings if possible
4ihea1I(llI 7eatep
Presents
"BELL, BOOK, and CANDLE"
A COMEDY OF WITCHERY
By JOHN VAN GRUTEN
CURTAIN - 8:30 P.M.
TONIGHT THROUGH JULY 19
For Ticket Information, Call Saline 31
Aig'ine I ill - eater
SALINE, MICHIGAN -- ON ROUTE 112

Yankee Slump Not Earth-Shaking

CUBS, PHILS WIN:
Milwaukee's 13 Hits
Down Cincinnati, 11-1

By WHITNEY MARTIN
NEW YORK-(IP)-There is a
corn belt saying that goes some-
thing like this: "Knee high by the
Fourth of July."
It refers to the normal progress
of the crop, but if quoted around
these parts it might be taken to
mean how the New York Yankees
feel. They've been shrinking in
stature at an astonishing rate.
* * *
HONESTLY, you'd think the
slump of the club was an earth-
shaking event, a combination of
the Fall of Rome, the Battle of
Waterloo and the Gl'eat Crash of
1929.
We are falling under the spell
until we grabbed ourselves by
the scruff, held ourselves at
arms length, and said sternly:
"See here, fella. Why all the
worry about the poor downtrodden

Yankees, who are only leading the
league and bidding for a fifth
straight pennant? Nobody worries
about the woes of the Browns, or
the Tigers. When you yourself go
into a slump, which is too often,
you can't call the bullpen for help
or bring in some bright young
farmhand to pull you out of it.
You worry it through, that's all.
As Marty Marion put it so ac-
curately: " 'I wish I had their
troubles.' "
* * *
SO WE WON'T dwell on the
problems of Casey Stengel, or re-
fer to the Yankees othe' than to
say that Saturday is the Fourth
of July, the traditional time to
take stock of the pennant races,
and the New York Yankees are in
first place, a spot where we think
theywill be at the close of the
season.
Cleveland and Chicago-and
Boston, if Lou Boudreau's kin-
dergarten class suddenly leaps
out of the sandpile and gets out
of hand-seem to be the only
other real contenders in the
American League. You can write
off the other clubs except for
their nuisance value, which
coild be considerable. Sometimes
a team which isn't going any-
where decides which team will
finish on top.
Cleveland has the pitching, andj
if Luke Easter remains in good'
health the Indians will be very

dangerous indeed. George Strick-
land, although something of a
blank spot in the batting order,
has given them the defensive
strength at shortstop they sorely
needed.
* * *
THE FIRE and drive of Man-
ager Paul Richards make the
White Sox a threat, but fire andl
drive can carry a team only so
far, as was demonstrated last
year when the Chicago club sag-
ged badly during the second half'
of the campaign. Speed and dash;
and fairhitting areatheir strong
points, but they lack adequate
pitching. Not enough Billy Pierces.
The National League still of-
fers a five-club race, and don't;
count those amazing Milwaukee
Braves out yet. Nobody expected
them to be playing musical
chairs withbthe Dodgers for the
lead now, but they're doing it
nevertheless. And it wasn't all
because of the enthusiasm en-
gendered by their new surround-
ings.
Charley Grimm has a sound,
much improved ball club, and the
pitching has been far better than
expectations. They've made it to
the middle of the stream in a vir-
tual tie for the top. Now the ques-
tion is whether they have the wind
to go the rest of the way.
* *
THE CHAMPION Dodgers are
a sound, experienced club withj
hap-hazard pitching. The boom-
ing bats have saved them many a
game, and will continue to do so.
They'll be hard to take out, de-I
spite a grinding and creaking at
various spots where age is taking
its toll.

TED KLUSZEWSKI
... 24th homer

Major League*
Standings

GOLFE RS
Have fun at the
Partridge Practice Range
We furnish clubs and bals
--212 miles out Washte-
now - right on U.S. 23
for 1 mile.
OPEN EVERY DAY
10 A.M. - 11 P.M.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
WV L Pct.
Brooklyn 44 26 .629
Milwaukee 44 28 .611
St. Louis 41 30 .577
Philadelphia 38 29 .567
New York 34 35 .493
Cincinnati 31 40 .437
Chicago 24 44 .353
Pittsburgh 26 50 .342
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Milwaukee 11, Cincinnati I
Chicago 10, St. Louis 3
Philadelphia 5, New York 1
* * - *

3' z
4 ,
19
21

r
A.

AMER)

New York
*Cleveland
Chicago
*Boston
*Washington
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
St. Louis
*De ctroit
4 -night games

ICAN LEAGUE
w 1. Pct.
48 2? .686
41 ' 28 .594
42 29 .592
39 35 .527
36 36 .500
3? 36 .500
32 41 .438
27 47 .365
22 49 .;310

GB
6!'
6,
11
13
17
s 3
2617;

By The Associated Press
MILWAUKEE - Everybody hit
safely except Eddie Mathews, the
major's co-leader in the runs bat-
ted in department, as the Milwau-
kee Braves exploded yesterday for
an 11-1 victory over Cincinnati to
move back within one game of
the idle Brooklyn Dodgers in the
National League pennant race.
The Braves, blasting two Red-
legs' pitchers for 13 hits, snapped
their own eight-game home losing
streak before 14,121 fans who
boosted thepaid attendance for
29 dates in the stadium here to
730,053.
* * *
JIM WILSON, veteran right-
hander, held the hard-hitting
Redlegs to four hits.
The lone Cincinnati run was
Ted Kluszekski's 24th homer of
the year which opened the sec-
ond inning. The blast returnedj
Kluszewski to the top spot inf
the majors' home run derby and!
was his second here in two days.
Milwaukee scored in all but the
second and third innings, blast-
ing starter Fred Baczewski for six
runs on three hits and tagging
Frank Smith for the final five
runs on three hits in the eighth.
* * *
CUBS 10, CARDS 3
CHICAGO - Third baseman
Ransom Jackson smashed two
homers and ;started a seven-run
eighth inning with a bases-loaded
single as the Chicago Cubs troun-
ced the third-place St. Louis Car-
dinals, 10-3, yesterday.
The Cubs' big inning shattered
a 3-3 deadlock and gave reliefer
Dutch Leonard his second victory.
VICTIM OF the Cards' sixth
defeat in 11 games with the Cubs
was Al Brazle, second of five hurl-
ers who followed starter Harvey
Haddix.
Jackson's homers, his 11th
and 12th, came with none
aboard in the second and sev-
enth innings to give the Cubs
leads of 2-0 and 3-1.
The Cards tied it up at 3-all
with a two-run eighth which cha-
sed Cub starter Turk Lown and
brought on Leonard. The ill-fated
Brazle started, but never finish-
ed, the eighth.
PHILS 5, GIANTS 1
PHILADELPHIA - Jim Kon-
stanty, with the help of two-run

__ ...____ ___._____r

homers by Del Ennis and Eddie
Waitkus, hurled his 10th victory
of the season yesterday for the
Philadelphia Phillies, a 5-1 ver-
dict over the New York Giants.
Konstanty, who won most valu-
able player honors in the national
league in 1950 as a record setting
relief artist, is staging a comeback
this year as a full time starter.
He allowed seven hits, one of
which was Bobby Thomson's
11th home run of the season in
the second inning.
Larry Jansen started for New
York and was charged with his
seventh loss of the campaign.
* * *
YANKS 4, ATHLETICS 0
NEW YORK-The New York
Yankees ran their new winning
streak to two in a row Friday as
Whitey Ford limited the Phila-
delphia Athletics to two hits while
his mates backed him up wjA
some solid slugging for a 4-0 vic-
tory.

On Sale Wednesday

Stay Cool!

Stay Comfortable!
AT THE COMFORTABLE

Stay Safe!

NOW SHOWING - LATE SHOW TONIGHT 11 P.M.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 4, Philadelphia 0
Washington at Boston (night)
Detroit at Cleveland (night)

COOL rr w k

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Charlotte GREENWOOD
Denise DARCEL th
William DEMAREST
Donna CORCORAN

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SUNDAY at 8:00 P.M. Only
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---N. Y. Times
"A PASSPORT
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, with
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and
"THE THIEF"
with
RAY MILLAND

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including names, home addresses
and Ann Arbor addresses
and phone numbers
of Summer Session students

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