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August 12, 1953 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1953-08-12

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PAGE THERE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

m

White Sox Stop Indians;
[ajor League
Standings.

Yanks Lose
Minoso's Home Rum Helps
Chicago To Defeat Lemon

CLASSIFIEDS

LOST AND FOUND

AMERICAN
W
New York 73
Chicago 68
Cleveland 62
Boston 73
Washington 55
Philadelphia 46
Detroit 39
St. Louis 38

LEAGUE
L Pet.
36 .670
43 .613
47 .569
51 .553
57 .491
64 .418
71 .355
75 .336

GB
6
11
121/
191/3
27 /
34J/
37

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
St. Louis 5-3, Detroit 2-9
Washington 2, New York 1
Chicago 6, Cleveland 2
Boston 7-7, Philadelphia 6-5
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at St. Louis (night)
Chicago at Cleveland (night)
New York at Washington (night)
Boston at Philadelphia (night)
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Brooklyn
Milwaukee
Philadelphia
St. Louis
New York
Cincinnati
Chicago
Pittsburgh
*

W L
72 37
66 46
60 48
60 48
53 53
49 62
42 65
37 80
* *

Pet.
.660
.589
.556
.556
.500
.441
.393
.316

GB
- /
7
11
112
17
24
29
39

PRO AND AMATEUR WINNERS OF "WORLD" GOLF-Happy winners of four divisions of the Tam
O'Shanter "World" golf tournament in Chicago display the trophies they won. Left to right: Frank
Stranahan of Toledo, Ohio, men's amateur winner; Lew Worsham of Oakmont, Pa., men's profes-
sional winner who received $25,000; Patty Berg of Chicago, women's professional winner who re-
ceived $5,000; and Margaret. Smith of Guadalajara, Mexico, women's amateur winner. Worsham
sank a spectacular 140-yard approach on the final hole to nose out Chandler Harper. Worsham's
72-hole total was 278, ten under par.
GIANTS MAY NOT BE DEAD:
Dressen Insult Recalls Terry Episode

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 1, Cincinnati 0
Pittsburgh 7-0, Philadelphia 4-3
Brooklyn 4, New York 0
St. Louis 4, Milwaukee 3
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at New York
Cincinnati at Chicago (2)
St. Louis at Milwaukee (2) (Twi-.
Night)
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh
(night)
Rangers Get
New Coach,
Bentle yBoys
NEW YORK - () - The New
York Rangers yesterday acquired
the Bentley brothers-Doug and
Max-two of the biggest names in
hockey.
At the same time they annuone-
ed that Frank Boucher would
coach the team next season.
* a *
BILL COOK, who had previously
been the coach, has resigned.
Cook and Boucher were stars with
the Rangers in the twenties and
thirties when the New York club
was one of the powers of the Na-
tional Hockey League.
The Rangers hoped to restore
one of the league's most success-
ful brother acts by getting the
Bentley boys to join the team.
Max was purchased from the To-
ronto Maple Leafs for an undis-
closed sum, while. Doug, his 38-
year-old brother was acquired
from New York's Saskatoon farm
club of the Western Hockey
League, where he had been the
player-coach.
Boucher, who has been with
the Rangers as a player, coach or
manager since the club entered the
National League in 1926, returns
to the dual manager-coach role
he filled from February 21, 1946
until December 22, 1948.
As a Ranger player, Boucher
was named center on the league
All-Star team three times and
was a seyen-time winner of the
Lady Byng Trophy awarded each
season to the N.H.L. performer ad-
Judged to have shown the best
type of sportsmanship.

By IVAN N. KAYE
Charley Dressen's recent pro-
nouncement regarding the state
of the New York National League
baseball club ("The Giants is
dead") brings back memories of
another insulting remark made
nearly two decades ago by a Gi-
ant manager with reference to the
Dodgers.
It was during the spring tra.M-
ing season of 1934 when the Giants
under Bill Terry were riding atop
the baseball world that a report-
er questioned the New York skip-
per as to how he thought the
Dodgers would finish in the coming
season.
- *
/
TERRY SNEERED and spoke
the famous sentence which was to
haunt him for the rest of his base-
ball days: "The Dodgers-are they
still in the league?"
The comment stirred the fires
of animosity in Flatbush to such
heights that a move was made
to sever all ties with Manhat-
tan.
True enough, the Bums with their
nice-guy manager Casey Sten-
gel were in the depths of the sec-
and division and were hardly con-
tenders for the pennant, but that
they were still very much in the
league was to be proven to Bill
Terry and his over-confident
champions ,with disasterous re-
sults.
ALL SEASON, the Giant-Dodg-
er games were marked by their ex-
treme ferocity. The excitement
reached fever pitch when the Gi-
ants invaded Ebbets Field in the
final week of the season for a four
game series with Stengel's team.
The Giants had been faltering
all through September and the
"Gas House Gang" from St.
DID YOU KNOW: that Ty Cobb,
the Detroit Tigers' all-time dia-
mond hero had a lifetime batting
average of .367? Cobb amassed his
great mark over the course of 24
seasons of major league baseball.
Most experts rate him the greatest
player of all time.

Louis with Dizzy and Paul Dean
were closing with a tremendous
rush that threatened to catch
the New Yorkers if they did not
take care of the seventh-place
Dodgers.
What happened during those
four fateful days in Brooklyn turn-
ed a gloomy community, which had
been forced to watch their beloved
Bums, stagger to a dismal seventh
place finish, into the wildest base-
ball town in the nation.
* * *
STENGEL became the hero of
heroes, and even the humiliation
wrought upon the present-day
Dodgers by his mighty Yankees
could never shake "Ol' Case" from
the hearts of the Brooklyn faitnful.
The Dodgers battered the Gi-
ants four times, and just to make
Terry's agony complete, the Car-
dinal rode roughshod over Chi-
cago to sweep to the flag.
The Giants had suffered one of
the greatest collapses in baseball
history, and it was the maligned
Bums from across the river who
had the pleasure of nailing shut
Bill Terry's baseball coffin.
Stengel moved on to Boston in
later years, and still finished last
or thereabouts as Leo Durocher

said nice guys always do, but the
time was not far off when he
would be riding at the top of the
rival league, and threatening as
he is this season to become the
first manager in history to win
five straight championships.
IN FACT, Stengel hasn't finish-
ed anything but first in the Amer-
ican League. But back in 1934 it
was a different story and a vic-
tory for the Dodgers usually came
sandwiched between defeats, ex-
cept fr that last series with the
Giants; and Brooklyn fans re-
member only those games and for-
get all the defeats.
Right now it doesn't look as
though any team can beat the
Dodgers to the pennant, but it
should be remembered that Bill
Terry's Giants were also seem-
ingly unbeatable in '34 and they
wound up listening to the World
Series instead of playing in it.
Durocher's Giants are not going
anywhere this season, but Dres-
sen's comment emblazened on
their locker room door for all to
see should make them just about
the toughest team in the league for
Brooklyn to handle.

By the Associated Press
CLEVELAND-Minnie Minoso's
three-run homer featured a five-
run uprising in the seventh inn-
ing last night. as the Chicago
White Sox drove Bob Lemon from
the box and scored a 6-2 victory
over the Cleveland Indians.
The White Sox victory enabled
them to gain a full game on the
league leading New York Yankees
who lost to Washington 2-1. The
Sox are now six games from first
place.
R f
THE INDIANS loaded the bases
with none out in the ninth inn-
ing, but Billy Pierce was sum-
moned from the bullpen and pre-
vented them from scoring by re-
tiring three straight. He struck
out La~ry Doby, retired Al Rosen
on a pop fly and Wally Westlake
on a pop foul.
Minoso, who collected three of
Chicago's 12 hits, doubled in
the first inning and scored on
Sam Mele's two bagger. Connie
Johnson then held a 1-0 lead
until the fifth when Lemon
doubled a run across for Cleve-
land.
A single by Chico Carrasquel, a
pinch double by Tom Wright, a
single by Bob Boyd and a walk
to Nellie Fox preceded Minoso's
14th homer in the seventh.
* * *
SENATORS 2, YANKEES 1,
WASHINGTON-Walt Master-
son choked off a ninth inning
New York rally last night with
some spectacular clutch pitching
that gave the Washington Sena-
tors a squeaky 2-1 decision over
the league leaders.
Hank Bauer got to third with
nobody out but he got no further
as Masterson fanned two Yanks
and got a third on a liner.
THE VICTORY was Washing-
ton's sixth in its last seven and the
fourth straight Senator victory
over the Yankees at Griffith Sta-
dium.
A crowd of 19,793 watched the
Senators take the lead off rookie
Bill Miller in the first and hang
on through a series of late inn-
ing New York rallies.
Consecutive singles by Mickey
Vernon, Keith Thomas and Clyde
Vollmer, all after two men had
been retired, gave Washington its
first inning counter. The deciding
run scored in the fourth on a
double by Wayne Terwilliger and
a single by rookie catcher Frank
Sacka.
The Yanks got their run in the
seventh on a walk to Bauer and
a triple by Irv Noren.
BROWNS 5-3, TIGERS 2-9
ST. LOUIS - Scoring four runs
in the first inning, mainly on the
strength of Don Lund's three-run
home run, the Detroit Tigers de-
feated the St. Louis Browns, 9-3,
in the second half of a twi-night
doubleheader last night after the
Browns had taken the first game,
5-2.
A three run homer also was the
big blow .of the Browns' victory
with Don Lenhardt doing the job
after two were out in the eighth
inning.
* * *
VETERAN VERN Stephens ac-
counted for two of the Browns'
runs in the second game, hitting
his third home run with a mate on
base in the first inning.
Ike Boone's 18th homer of
the season - and sixth of the
year against the Browns-put the
Tigers ahead, 2-1, in 'the sixth
inning of the first game.

Roy Sievers pulled the Browns
even again in their half of the
inning by touching losing pitcher
Billy Hoeft for his seventh home
run of the season.
* * *
PIRATES 7-0, PHILLIES 4-3
PITTSBURGH-Southpaw Curt
Simmons blanked Pittsburgh 3-0
on six hits-all of them singles--
last night after the Pirates whip-
ped the Philadelphia Phillies 7-4
in a suspended game preceding
the regular contest.
Del Ennis' bases-loaded fly ball
and Granny Hamner's triple with
two aboard accounted for all of
the Phillie runs in the third.
SIMMONS ran into trouble in
the first inning, allowing three
singles but the Phillies saved the
shutout for the 24-year-old left-
hander by executing a double play
to nip a run at the plate.
In the suspended contest, the Pi-
rates scored all seven runs on July
5 and that was all they needed to
give rookie Jim Waugh his second
victory of the season against three
defeats, although he needed help
from Paul LaPalme in the ninth.
CUBS 1, REDLEGS 0
CHICAGO - Paul Minner held
Cincinnati to three scattered hits
yesterday to give the Cubs a 1-0
triumph over the Redlegs in the
first game of a four-game series.
Minner yielded just three scat-
tered singles and one walk in post-
ing his eighth win-and the Cubs'
first shutout success since Bob
Rush blanked the Braves in Mil-
waukee May 9.
* * *
JACKIE COLLUM, the Redleg's
short southpaw, suffered his sev-
enth setback as one of his four
walks set the stage for the game's
only run.
Eddie Miksis walked with one
out in the second, and moved to
second on Clyde McCullough's
infield scratch single.'Hal Jeff-
coat then followed with a line
single to left, Miksis scoring.
Collum was tagged for six hits
as Chicago cashed its seventh safe-
ty off Bud Podbielan who pitch-
ed the eighth after Jackie was
side-tracked for a pinch batter in
the Redleg's seventh straight loss.
Miss America
To Welcome
J. C. Golfers
Neva Jane Langley of Georgia,
Miss America of 1953, will be in
Ann Arbor for the Eighth Inter-
national Jaycee Junior Golf Tour-
nament which begins on the Uni-
versity course over the weekend.
She will welcome over 200 of the
best junior golfers from 37 states,
Hawaii, Canada and the Canal
Zone. The tournament is sponsored
by the United States Junior Cham-
ber of Commerce.
Practice rounds at the Michigan
course are scheduled for Saturday
and Sunday.
Eighteen hole qualifying rounds
will be played by the entire field
on Monday and Tuesday. Then
the best 100 scorers will be allowed
to continue in four days of play
to determine the tournament
champ in 72 holes of medal play.
The tournament will culminate
with an awards ceremony at the
Michigan course. The Jaycee
Junior Champion and state team
and other awards will be made.

LOST - Monday, Argus FA camera in
ground floor Haven Hall restroom.
Undeveloped pictures valuable me-
mentos. Reward. Call 2-2707, Virginia
Rock.
FOR SALE
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1.39.
Skip-dents, sanforized. whites and
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington St.
SMALL walnut gateleg table $40. One
large oak sideboard $5.00. One large
double-coil springs $15.00. One up-
holstered chair $1.00. One large wal-
nut veneer table and five chairs $25.
One wool rug $65. Two large walnut
veneer buffets, $15 each. One small
folding steel cot $10.00. Large daven-
port with green leatherette, $15. Two
doll high chairs, $2.50 each. Phone
2-9020.
MUSIC AMPLIFIER and public address
system in portable leatherette case.
New, only two available. Excellent
for high quality music reproduction.
Complete with speaker, $49.95. A. A.
-Radio & T.V. 1215 So. University.
Ph. 7942.
BIKE-Used girls 3-speed Raleigh. Call
2-8885 after 5 p.m.
'MOHAWK balloon tire bike (girls). Call
Nancy Church, Alice Lloyd Hall.
1941 PLYMOUTH CLUB COUPE - Very
good appearance inside and out.
Mechanically reliable. Have new car.
Phone 3-5915 or visit after 4 p.m. at
517 E. Washington, Apt. 4.
VACUUM CLEANER. 11 month old Jet-
99 Universal tank-type. Exactly like
new (not even scratched). $40 or less
than half new price. 832 So. Main St.
FOR RENT
DELUXE Bachelor Apt. Private entrance.
Semi-private bath. Between Ypsi &nd
Ann Arbor. $67.50 a month. Ph. 2-9020.
ACCOMMODATIONS for Fall are avail-
able for men students now in large
double rooms in house 5 minutes
from campus. Call 3-0849, 406 Packard
APARTMENTS, roomettes, or rooms by
day or week for campus visitors.
Campus Tourist Homes, 518 E. Wil-
11am St. Phone 3-8454.
3 CAMPUS APARTMENTS -Furnished
for groups of three or four girls. To
begin Sept. 15. Inquire 518 E. William
St.
FREE LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS -
For couple in exchange for 2 hours of
housework daily. Near campus. Ph.
3-8454.
PERSONAL
ZE LAST TIME to save millions by sub-
scribing at special student summer
rates to Time, Life, US News, Sat. Eve.
Post, et al. Phone Student Periodical
Agency, 6007, to order or to inquire.
TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING to Toronto and Kingston
August 14. Can take three passengers.
Returning August 17. Call 2-5180
after 5:00 p.m.
WANTED-Ride to Urbana, Illinois Sat-
urday. Phone 3-8859 evenings.
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Taxi cab drivers, full or part
time. Yellow and Checker Cab Co.
113 S. Ashley. Ph. 9382.
MAKE $20.00 DAILY - Sell luminous
name plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass., Free Sample and details.

HELP WANTED
WANTED-Dental hygienist or assistant.
No experience necessary. Write Dr
A. E. Van Ornum, 821 Penniman Ave.
Plymouth, Mich., or call 1004 afte
August 17th.
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
RADIO-PHONO SERVICE
" Fast-In Today, Ready Tomorrow
" Reasonable Rates-Guaranteed Service
" Phonos & Auto Radios Our Specialty
" New & Used Radios & Phonos
" Custom Auto Radios at Reduced Price
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T.V.
1215 So. University Ph. 7942
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.
WANTED TO BUY
SINGLE BREASTED White Dinner Jack-
ets. Sizes 36 and 40. Phone 3-2962
after 4 p.m.
WANTED TO RENT
AIR FORCE officer, wife, & cocker span-
iel desire to rent or lease 2 or 3 bed-
room home for 2 years, preferably
suburb or semi-rural location. Daily
Box 24.
YOUNG COUPLE seeking 2 or 3 rooms.
Husband law school student, wife
school teacher, no children, no pets.
Daily Box 16.
STARTING TODAY
WHEN ONE MAN-
DARED THE TERROR

i

SPORTS TRAIL:

ors ham's Tam O'Shanter
Shot Called Best in History

By WILL GRIMSLEY
NEW YORK-(I)-It probably
will be many more years-if ever
--before golf is able to produce a
dramatic climax to match Lew
Worsham's eagle deuce on the fi-
nal hole last Sunday which won
him Tam O'Shanter's $25,000 pot
of gold.
Did you see it? Many thousands,
perhaps millions, did. It was beam-
ed right into our living rooms by
television. That made the feat all
the more dramatic.
THE NEXT DAY in busy New
York, where chief interest centers
on the welfare of the Yank6es,
Giants or Dodgers, non-golf-mind-
ed citizens were punching friends
with their elbows and saying ex-
citedly:
"Did you see that finish? Gosh,
what a shot!"
You had to have the setting to

get the real bang out of the blow,
conceded to be perhaps the great-
est finishing shot of all time.
WORSHAM was the last man
on the course and just in front
of him a Virginian by the name
of Chandler Harper had scored a
birdie three for a score of 279,
nine under par.
Worsham was on No. 17 at the
time and it meant he must get
two birdies to tie or play the last
two holes in three under par to
win. He canned his birdie on
No. 17 and then, with the cam-
eras trained on him trudged
up the 18th fairway.
From the fairway of the 410-
yard final hole he chose a wedge
to make his 140-yard "do or die"
second shot. The ball landed on
the green and trickled into the cup.

HENRY H.
STEVENS, Inc.
L.ONG
DISTANCE4r: .f
MOVING

Flint, MichiganS
86
tes.

Bill
Stevens
Lit. '40
Mandgr

Phone Flint
Collect 4-168
For Lower
Interstate Ra

We own, operate and schedule our own fleet of vans
for direct service without transfer.

U

PLEASE
We would hate to have to disappoint
you at the door -
MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS

Washington's Porterfield Tops
Pitchers with Eight Shutouts

N
C1

*

*

OW PLAYING
N THE DRAMA RAMA STAGE

Ik - A -I

11

er ection in. lodern Cooling
HELD OVER
The Tops in
TECH N ICOLOR
MUSICALS!
M-G-M's

WORSHAM was Tam O'Shauter
champion with a $25,000 prize by
one stroke.
Fred Corcoran, the walking
sports encyclopedia who serves
as promotional director for the
PGA tournament bureau, saw
the shot. He said it was the all-
time climax of golf.
"There have been many brilliant
and important shots in golf," Cor-
coran said, "but certainly none
made under these circumstances,
with such a rich prize and with
such a vast audience-and by a
man playing last in the field.
"OF COURSE, there's Gene Sar-
azen's double eagle in the Masters
in 1935 which ultimately gave him
the championship. But it was on
the 15th hole, a 240-yard spoon
shot.
"And once in Britain Walter
Hagen needed an eagle two on
the final hole to tie Bob Jones.
With a grand flourish, he sent

EARLY FOR

II

OSCAR WILDE'S
8i/LeJmporlance

NEW YORK - (A') - Bob Por-
terfield, ace Washington right-
hander, has pitched eight shutouts
this season but still can't seem to
shake the hard luck that has dog-
ged him throughout his career.
The oft-injured Virginian hit
rock-bottom last year when he
lost seven games by shutouts,
three by scores of 1-0.
SOMEHOW he has managed to
escape being shut out this year
but Lady Luck still refuses to smile
upon him.
Four times in his career--
twice this season -Porterfield
has come within one blow of
pitching a no-hitter. He is be-
ginning to think he'll never
achieve his goal of hurling a no-
hitter.
Although only 10 pitchers in
American League history have top-
ped Porterfield's eight shutouts
for one season, Bob finds him-
self far away from setting a club

against every team in the league.
Thus far he has blanked every
club except Detroit.
Only Christy Mathewson and
Grover Cleveland Alexander, of
the National League, have been
able to blank all opposing seven
clubs.
* * *
WHEN Jack oombs of the 1910
Philadelphia Athletics set the
American League record of 13
shutouts in one season, he blanked
every team but Detroit.
The most one-hitters pitched
in a lifetime is 10 by Bob Fel-
ler.
The 29-year-old Porterfield, with
three straight shutouts and 29
consecutive scoreless innings, has
an earned run average of 3.51. His
won-lost record with the fifth-
place Senators is 14-9.
I rA gi'ie' g Im

I

8 :30
Every Night
But Monday
1

greatest since
its famed hit
"An American in Paris"!

ANGEL
STREET
Formerly "GASLIGHT"
A
VICTORIAN THRILLER
IN THREE ACTS
BY
PATRICK HAMILTON
AUG. 4 to AUG. 16

TICKETS
$1.80
Call Saline 31
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WAGON"
Technicolor Musical
Starring

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