100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 06, 1953 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-08-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 6, 1953

TIE MICHI GAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

I me"M

Br aves

Beat

Dodgers;

Yankees

Whin

CFLASSIFIEDS

Philadelphia Stops Cards;
Chicago Wins Two Games

v-

New York Defeats Detroit;
Washington Drubs Indians

By The Associated Press
MILWAUKEE-Walker Cooper's
pinch single in the eighth inning
sent home the winning run yes-
terday as the Milwaukee Braves
snapped a six-game losing streak
to Brooklyn by a 5-3 margin.
} The Braves chased starter Carl
Erskine and reliefer Erv Palica
in the three-run eighth, with the
cushion run counting on Eddie
Mathews' bases-loaded walk off
Palica.
S* * *
THE VICTORY enabled the
Braves to cut a full game off
Brooklyn's league lead, although
they still trail by 71/ games.
Lew Burdette, who was in-
volved in an apparent name-
calling episode with Dodger
catcher Roy Campanella Mon-
day night, retired the last three
Brooklyn batters to preserve the
victory.
Ernie Johnson, who relieved
starter Max Surkont in the eighth,
received credit for the win.
Erskine had a shutout going
until the seventh when a two-base
error by Junior Gilliam on pinch
hitter Harry Hanebrink's hard-
hit grounder scored Del Crandall,
and Jack Dittmer.
Warren Spahn, running for
Cooper, was hit by Billy Bruton's
grounder, but Sibby Sisti walked
to fill the bases and a pass to
Eddie Mathews forced in the
cushion run.
* * *
PHILLIES 7, CARDS 3
4 ST. LOUIS-Bob Miller gave up
a two-run homer to Stan Musial
in the first inning, but then slam-'
' med the door last night to pitch
the Philadelphia Phillies to a 7-3
victory over the St. Louis Card-
inals and extend their third-place
advantage to two and one-half
l games over the Redbirds.
The Phillies bunched three safe-
ties with two walks for three runs
in the second inning and then
scored an unearned tally in the
seventh. The final three hits and
runs came off Al Brazle in the
ninth.'
CUBS 9-7, GIANTS 6-6
CHICAGO -The New Yorkt
DID YOU KNOW: that Michi-t
gan Stadium is the largest college
stadium in the nation? It was con-t
structed in 1927 with an original
seating capacity of 79,000. In 1949
a new addition was built which in-l
creased the seating capacity to its
present 97,239.

Giants suffered their fifth and
sixth consecutive losses as the re-
vived Chicago Cubs swept both
ends of a doubleheader yesterday
7-6 and 9-6, winning the second
game in the 10th inning on a run-
scoring single by shortstop Tommy
,rown.
In the three-hour second game,
34 players got into action as Chi-
cago earned its sweep with three
straight singles in the first extra
inning. Sixteen were Cubs.
Before the quick finish, the
Giants took a 5-3 lead in the
eighth.
But the Cubs scored threetimes
in the eighth to move in front 6-5.
Dutch Leonard came in to spell.
starter Johnny Klippstein in the
first game. Leonard chilled the
New Yorkers' five-run eighth to
save his nephew's sixth decision
as Larry Jansen suffered his
eighth loss.
Each team collected 12 hits in
the opener. The Cubs held, a 14-
10 hitting edge in the nightcap.

THE BIG THREE WINNERS-These three golfers toast each oth-
er after each won their respective classes in the All-American
tournaments at Tam O'Shanter Country Club near Chicago. Left
to right are Lloyd Mangrum, who won the professional All-Ameri-
can crown; Patty Berg, who won the women's open; and Frank
Stranahan, who captured his sixth straight All-American ama-
teur title.

SPORTS TRAIL:
Empty Tennis Courts Traced to. Ike

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-Yogi Berra drove
home Mickey Mantle with a tie-
breaking double in the seventh
inning yesterday for a 5-4 New
York Yankee decision over Detroit.
Johnny Sai, coming to the res-
cue of Jim McDonald in the third
inning, skirted disaster the rest of
the way, scattering seven Tiger
hits over the last six innings.
BILLY HOEFT, the young south-
paw who set the Yanks down with
three hits the last time he started
against them, July 24, went all
the way and was touched for 10
hits.
After New York took a 1-0
lead in the first, the Tigers came
back with three to knock out
McDonald in the third.
Gus Triandos, the rookie first
baseman just called up from
Birmingham, hit a homer in the
fourth. Billy Martin did the same
thing to tie the score.
The Yanks moved in front in
the fifth, but Detroit came right
back to tie in the seventh.
There were two out before the
champs scored again in the last
of the seventh.
It was Sain's 10th victory andE
Hoeft's ninth defeat.
SENATORS 11, INDIANS 0
WASHINGTON - Bob Porter-
field pitched his second successive
shutout and his seventh of the
season last night as Washington
mauled Cleveland 11-0 on an out-
burst of 17 hits.
The defeat dropped the third-
place Indians 8% games back of
the league-leading Yankees.
* * *
PORTERFIELD held the In-
dians to six hits.
Porterfield, who posted his
13th win, also hit two doubles
in the Senators' assault. Dave
Hoskins, the loser, yielded 13 of
the blows before being yanked
in the seventh inning.
Every Washington player got at
least one hit.
The Senators, scoreless for 23
innings, clipped Hoskins for two
runs in the second inning, added
four in the fifth inning and chased
him in a two-run seventh inning.
lHajor League
Standings

By WILL GRIMSLEY
NEW YORK-(iP)-The weath-
beaten old man leaned back in his
wooden chair and surveyed the ex-
panse of empty tennis courts with
a touch of remorse.
"It's Ike who's done it, that's

wlat," he said. "Maybe this fellow
Hogan a' little, too, but mainly Ike.
He's bankrupting tennis."
THE SCENE was a semi-public
tennis plant in Forest Hills-not
the famed West Side Tennis Club

'world' Golf Tourney Opens
Today at Tam O'S~anter Club

CHICAGO - (V) - Tournament-
wise pros, regrouping for a mass
assault on par, yesterday set 275
as the magic number in the Tam
O'Shanter golf jackpot this week-
end.
They said that figure, 13 strokes
under par for 72 holes of pressure
shooting, should be good enough'
to win the $25,000 bonanza of the
"World Championship" starting
today.
THE TOTAL purse in the men's
pro field of 83 starters is $75,000,
and the $25,000 top prize is the
richest payoff in golf.
In the $12,000 World meet for
women pros, $5,000 goes to the
champion.
In addition to the men and
er ctionT n modern Goolin
STARTING TODAY

ENDING FRIDAY

women pro divisions, there are
World championships for men and
women amateurs.I
* ,' *
ALL FOUR divisions run con-'
currently. Except for the large
men's pro field, each of the other'
tournaments has 12 handpicked
contestants.
Julius Boros is defending
champion of the World men's
pro division.
B en Hogan, the 1953 Masters'
U. S. Open and British Open
champion, is not entered this time.
FRANK STRANAHAN will be
shooting for his fourth straight
World amateur title, while Betty
Jameson willattempt to defend
her crown in the women's pro
section.
Mary Villegas will not be on
hand to defend her title in the
women's amateur.
The pros figure that the odds
against Lloyd Mangrum winning
the World, after taking the all
American title with 275 Monday,
are about 30-1. Mangrum won
both meets in 1948.
DID YOU KNOW: that Michi-
gan is the only school ever to win
four consecutive Western Con-
ference football championships?
The Wolverines have turned the
trick three times. Fielding Yost's
teams of 1901-02-03-04, Harry
Kipke's squads of 1930-31-32-33,
and the Michigan teams of 1947-
48-49-50, the first under Fritz
Crisler and the last three under
Bennie Oosterbaan have all per-
formed the feat. The only Big
Ten school other than Michigan
to win as many as three in a row
was Minnesota of 1909-10-11. '

-where you can plank down a
buck and play for an hour. But
nobody was doing it. The courts
were empty.
"I remember just as late as
last year you couldn't get on
these courts without a reserva-
tion a couple of days in ad-
vance," the old man added.
"All over the city the public
courts were busy, every day but
mostly on weekends. Now, look at
the weekends. Courts are still not
being used. Just a few scattered
players.
"WHEN PRESIDENT Eisenhow-
er started playing golf it changed
the whole sports picture.
"Have you checked the pub-
lic golf courses around here? A
five and six hour wait to get on
the first tee. That's an honest
fact. You can't get near a golf
course on weekends.
"It's all Eisenhower, too, I think.
And maybe that fellow, Ben Ho-
gan: He went over and won that
British tournament. They give him
a parade. Everybody starts talking
about him. He becomes a hero."
THIS WAS QUITE a spiel and
called for some investigation.
The old man was right, in
spots. Public golf courses and
private ones as well are jammed
to capacity. Tennis in the east
may have slackened some, but
the old man is not exactly right
that it's dying on the vine.
Said the President of the U.S.
Lawn Tennis Association: "Cer-
tainly President Eisenhower's in-
terest in golf has added interest
in the sport. But tennis is still
going well. I have just had a re-
port from the sporting goods com-
panies. They say tennis sales are
up this year. They may have been
down a little last year."
But Mercer Beasley, the old ten-
nis coach, had another tack.
"Sure, Ike is creating a golf
boom," he said. "But what is there
for us tennis people to do about it
except elect Adlai Stevenson next
time. Adlai is a tennis player.'

AMERICAN LEAGUE

W L
New York ...69 34
Chicago ,...65 40
Cleveland . 'Al 43
Boston .....59 48
Washington 50 '56
Philadelphia 43 61
Detroit .....38 66
St. Louis ... . 35 72

WHITE SOX 9 ATHLETICS 7
PHILADELPHIA - Sam Mele
lined a home run into the left
field stands with a man aboard in
the 14th inning last night to give
the dogged Chicago White Sox a
9-7 victory over the Philadelphia
Athletics.
Mele's clout kept the White Sox
five games behind the American
League leaders, the New York
Yankees.
THE WHITE SOX jumped off
to a lead and then watched the
A's fight back to tie the game in
the eighth inning when Eddie Mc-
Ghee smashed a home run with
Gus Zernial aboard.
After that the teams traded
threats in the extra innings un-
til Mele's clout won the game.
The White Sox, clinging bitter-
ly to hopes of overtaking the New
York Yankees in the American
League pennant race, lost the ser-
vices of their prize first baseman,
Ferris Fain, for 10 days to two
weeks.
THE LOSS OF the fiery, two-
time American League batting
champion came as the White Sox
prepped for their weekend "must
series" at Yankee .Stadium.-
They play four games there,
and on the outcome of those
contests could rest the American
League pennant.
Manager Paul Richards con-
firmed that Fain suffered a frac-
ture of his ring finger of his left
hand, his throwing hand.
S* *
THE STORY is that Fain was
dancing with a girl Sunday night
when he became involved in a
fist fight.
James Judge, 28, of Washing-
ton, filed a $50,000 damage suit
in the District of Columbia Fed-
eral Court. Fain, 31, suffered a
cut forehead and a skinned
cheek.
And yesterday the word spread
that Richards is deducting from
Fain's salary, rumored at about
$30,000 a year, a day's pay for
each day he misses from playing.
So far it's estimated to have cost
Fain about $600.
RED SOX 5, BROWNS 0
BOSTON-The Boston Red Sox
made it two in a row over the St.
Louis Browns yesterdayeashBen
Flowers made his first major
league start a winning one 5-0.
Remind 'M' Fans
To Order Tickets
Michigan football followers yes-
terday were reminded that thel
deadline for application for sea-
son tickets falls next Monday.
Michigan Ticket Manager Don
Weir, who said season applications
now are more numerous than they
were at the same time in 1952,
stated that all applications post-
marked before Monday midnight
would receive priority in the mat-
ter of seat location.
The Wolverines' six game home
schedul wllieEyt. 5
schedule will get under way on
September 26, when Coach Ben-
nie Oosterbaan's team opposes
the Huskies of the University of
Washington.
Later home games are with Tu-
lane (High School Band Day) on
October 3; Iowa, October 10;
Northwestern (Michigan, Band
Homecoming Day, October 17;
Pennsylvania (Homecoming), Oc-
tober 31; and Ohio State, Novem-
ber 21.
Sale of tickets for individual
games will continue after Mon-
day's season ticket application
deadline has passed.

__ FOR SALE
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1.39.
Skip-dents, Sanforized, whites and
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington St.
SMALL walnut gateleg table $40. One
large oak sideboard $5.00. One large
double-coil springs $15.00. One up-
holstered chair $1.00. One large wal-
nut veneer table and five chairs $25.
One wool rug $65. Two large walnut
veneer buffets. $15 each. One small
folding steel cot $10.00., Large daven-
port with green leatherette, $15. Two
doll high chairs, $2.50 each. Phone
2-9020.
TWO-BEDROOM HOUSE-New ranch-
style house and 2 lots, 10 min. drive
from Ann Arbor. Priced for quick sale
at $9,700. Very reasonable terms. Ph.
2-3245.
B&L MICROSCOPE-Monocular auto-
matic stage lens 3.2, 10, 43, 97. Eye
pieces 5 and 10. Carrying case. Excel-
lent condition $180. Call 3-4849.
TRAILER-2-wheel, metal sides, com-
plete with hitch, ready for your mov-
ing, vacationing, hauling, etc. Phone
25-7843.
FOR SALE-1949 BUICK Super Dynaflo.
Radio, heater, turn signals, backup
lights, foam rubber cushions. $895.
Call 3-1870 or 2-8179 after 6 p.m.
RALIEGH 3-speed girl's bicycle. Call
Ruth Gowa, 2-3276.
WASHER-1951 Kenmore, ringer, like
new. Univ. Ext. 2-844.
FORRENT__
BACHELOR QUARTERS for Fall. Large,
comfortable single room for two grad
students, Private entrance, bath, gar-
age, refrigerator. Located in quiet
residential neighborhood. Telephone
2-7886.
DELUXE Bachelor Apt. Private entrance.
Semi-private bath. Between Ypsi and
Ann Arbor. $67.50 a ponth. Ph. 2=9020.
ACCOMMODATIONS for Fall are avail-
able for men students now in large
double rooms in house 5 minutes
from campus. Call 3-0849, 406 Packard.
APARTMENTS, roomettes, or rooms by
day or week for campus visitors.
Campus Tourist Homes, 518 S. Wil-
liam St. Phone 3-8454.

WANTED-Ride to U.P. Leave after 4
p.m., Aug. 13. Ph. 202 Hayden, E.Q.
RIDE WANTED to Washington, D.C. -
Leaving August 16, 17, or 18. Call
2 -9918.
RIDERS WANTED to New York. Leav-
ing Aug. 6th or 7th. Stopping over-
night. Phone Hockney, 3-0829.
PERSONAL
THERE'S NOT much more time for
students and faculty to subscribe at
summer special rates to Time ($3),
Life ($4), and numerous other mags.
For information phone Student Peri-
odical Agency, 6007.
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Taxi cab drivers, full or part
time. Yellow and Checker Cab Co.
113 S. Ashley. Ph. 9382.
MAKE $20.00 DAILY - Sell luminous
name plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass., Free Sample and details.
WILL EXCHANGE room rent for help.
Mrs. Ruffins. 562 S. Seventh.
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, Finished Work, and Rand
Ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
RADIO-PHONO SERVICO
" Fast--In Today, Ready TomorroW
" Reasonable Rates-Guaranteed Service
" Phonos & Auto Radios Our Specialty
" New & Used Radios & Phonos
" Custom Auto Radios at Reduced Price
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T.V.
1215 So. University Ph. 7942
EXPERT TYPIST - Rates reasonable.
Prompt' service. 914 Mary Street.
3-4449.
WANTED TO RENT
AIR FORCE officer, wife, cocker span.
jel desire to rent or lease 2 or 3 bed-
room home for 2 years, preferably
suburb or semi-rural location. Ph.
3-4166.

Pct.
.670
.619
.587
.551
.472
.413
.365
.327

GB
5
. '/
12
201/
26Y/
31%
36

CAMERAS FOR RENT
8 mm movie - 6 mm movie
also 8mm and 16mm PROJECTORS
35 mm stereo
Polaroid and Snapshot Cameras
at
Purchase Camera Shop
1116 So. University Phone 6972
Come~a SL 5 jdI4
TONIGHT and Friday at 7:00 and 9:00 P.M.
DANA JEANNE DICK VIVIAN
ANDREWS CRAIN HAYMES BLAINE
in RODGERS and HAMMERSTEIN'S
Kaleidoscopic, Gay, Pungent Musical
with a bevy of famous songs including "That's For Me," "It's a
Grand Night for Singing," and "it Might As Well Be Spring"
"STATE FAIR"
in COLOR BY TECHNICOLOR
with Percy Kilbride, Charles Winninger, Fay Bainter
"Rodgers and Hammerstein are two gentlemen who can't touch
anything but what it glows. 'State Fair' is as gawdy a gild of
agriculture as ever you're likely to see." - New York Times
By the Producers of "SOUTH PACIFIC"
EXTRA! DONALD DUCK in Technicolor
Coming Saturday and Sunday
H UMPH REY BOGART
in DASHIELL HAMMETT'S
THE MALTESE FALCON"
with Sidney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, and Mary Astor
"One of ihe most compelling nervous-laughter provokers yet,..
The best mystery thriller of the year . . , devilishly delightful,
done with taste and understanding and a feeling for the fine line
of suspense."--New York Times.
EXTRA! TECHNICOLOR CARTOON
Architecture Auditorium - 50c
CORNER TAPPAN & MONROE

TRANSPORTATION

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Washington 11, Cleveland 0
Chicago 9, Philadelphia 7
New York 5, Detroit 4
Boston 5, St. Louis 0
TODAY'S GAMES
Cleveland at Washington
Chicago at Philadelphia
Detroit at New York
St. Louis at Boston

NATIONAL
W
Brooklyn .. .67
Milwaukee ..60
Philadelphia 57
St. Louis ....55
New York ...52
Cincinnati ..49
Chicago ....39
Pittsburgh ..35

LEAGUE
L Pet.
36 .650
44 .577
44 .564
47 .539
49 .515
57 .462
62 .386
75 .318

GB
7%
9
11%/
14
191/
27
35%/

U 'I

NOW
ON THENDRAMA
8:30 AN
Every Night
But Monday IT
Formerly
Victoria
in Th
Patrick
Aug. 4t

PLAYING
RAMA STAGE
GEL TICKETS
EEC i$1.80
R EET" C"'

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Milwaukee 5, Brooklyn 3
Chicago 9-7, New York 6-6
Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 4
Philadelphia 7, St. Louis 3
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Milwaukee (2)
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati
New York at Chicago
Philadelphia at St. Louis (night)

EVERYTHING YOU'VE HEARD IS TRUE!

'.

_ .'I
.,~

"Gaslight"
a
an Thriller
ree Acts .
by
Hamilton
to Aug. 16

; ;
. ;
..t
H
.'
;'
}t
J?-
'
"

11

I

... !

:1

U

- U :T A

I

E I N 1..I. .:..

I ~ -. - - -.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan