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August 05, 1953 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-08-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-:r

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY *

%i"

PAGE THREE

?AGE THREE

New

York

Overpowers

Tige rs,

15-0

CLASSIFIEDS

White Sox Dump Athletics;
Roberts Defeats Cardinals

Major Leagues

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23.24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES I DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-Vic Raschi of the
New York Yankees set a major
league record for pitchers last
night when he drove in seven
runs against the Detroit Tigers.
The previous record was six,
shared by five American league
hurlers.
RASCHI singled with the bases
loaded, driving in two runs in the
second inning. He doubled home
three runs in the third inning and
singled in two more in the fourth.
Last season Raschi batted in
a total of two runs.
The New Yorkers flaunted their
strength at the seventh place Tig-
ers by lifting Raschi after six
innings to rest him for the big
Chicago series this weekend.
THE RIGHTHANDER gave up
just two hits. Art Schallock, low
man on the Yankee staff, gave up
four hits in the final three inn-
ings and preserved the shutout.
Raschi drove in two runs in
the second inning when he
singled with the bases loaded.
That equalled his total runs
batted in for last season. In the
third he came up again with
the sacks full and cleared
them with a double. Again in
the fourth the bases were loaded
when Vic batted and this time
he singled home two more.
The previous major league rec-
ord for RBI's by a pitcher was
six, shared by five American
League hurlers-George Uhle of
Cleveland, Wes Ferrell of Boston,
Pete Appleton of Washington,
Spud Chandler of the Yankees
and Ellis Kinder of Boston.
WHITE SOX 8, ATHLETICS 3
PHILADELPHIA-Veteran Vir-
gil Trucks fireballed a four-hitter
at the Philadelphia Athletics last
night as the Chicago White Sox
came through with a six-run
splurge in the fourth inning to

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cushion their way for an 8-3 win.
The 34-year-old righthander
racked up his 14th win of the sea-
son against five losses. He held
the Philadelphia batsmen hitless
until Loren Babe singled to open
the sixth inning. He now has 107
strikeouts for the year.
THE WHITE SOX gave him
plenty of working margin in the
fourth. Fred Marsh opened with
a walk and Bob Boyde singled to
center.
Minnie Minoso singled to
center scoring Marsh and then
starter Harry Byrd walked Bob
Elliott, Eddie Stewart and Jim
Rivera to force in two runs.
Southpaw Frank Fanovich re-
placedĀ° Byrd and primptly wild-
pitched Elliott across the plate.
Sherman Lollar flied to center,
Stewart scoring and Chico Car-
rasquel tripled to right to bring
home Rivera.
PHILLIES 8, CARDS 1
ST. LOUIS-Robin Roberts won
his 19th game of the season last
night as he limited the St. Louis
Cardinals to five hits to lead the
Philadelphia Phillies to an 8-1
victory.
Roberts, who has lost only seven
games, struck out seven, walked
two and hit one.
The Cardinals scored their only
run against Roberts in the first
inning when veterans Stan Musial
and Enos Slaughter backed up a
pair of doubles.

AMERICAN
W
New York .. .68
Chicago ....64
Cleveland ..61
Boston .....58
Washington 49
Philadelphia 43
Detroit .....38
- St. Louis ....35

LEAGUE
L Pet..
34 .667
40 .615
42 .592
48 .547
56 .467
60 .417
65 .369
71 .330

GB
5
7%/
12
20%
25=/2
30
35

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 15, Detroit 0
Cleveland 3, Washington 0
Chicago 8, Philadelphia 3
Boston 6, St. Louis 2
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at New York
Cleveland at Washington (night)
Chicago at Philadelphia (night)
St. Louis at Boston
* * *

NATIONAL
W
Brooklyn ...67
Milwaukee ..59
Philadelphia 56.
St. Louis ....55
New York ...52
Cincinnati ..49
Chicago ....37{
Pittsburgh ..34'

LEAGUE-
L Pet.
35 .657
44 .573f
44 .560
46 .545
47 .525
56 .467
62 .374.
75 .312

GB
s..
8%
10
11%
13%/
191/
281/2
36%/

FOR SALE
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1.39.
Skip-dents, sanforized, whites and
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington St.
SMALL walnut gateleg table $40. One
large oak sideboard $5.00. One large
double-coil springs $15.00. One up-
holstered chair $1.00. One large wal-
nut veneer table and five chairs $25.
One wool rug $65. Two large walnut
veneer buffets. $15 each. One small
folding steel cot $10.00. Large daven-
port with green leatherette, $15. Two
doll high chairs, $2.50 each. Phone
2-9020.
CANARIES and Parakeets. Bird supplies
and cages. 526 S. Seventh at W. Mad-
ison. Mrs. Louise Ruffins.
TWO-BEDROOM HOUSE-New ranch-
style house and 2 lots, 10 min. drive
from Ann Arbor. Priced for quick sale
at $9,700. Very reasonable terms. Ph.
2-3245.
B&L MICROSCOPE-Monocular auto-
matic stage lens 3.2, 10, 43, 97. Eye
pieces 5 and 10. Carrying case. Excel-
lent condition $180. Call 3-4849.
TRAILER-2-wheel, metal sides, com-
plete with hitch, ready for your mov-
ing, vacationing, hauling, etc. Phone
25-7843.
FOR RENT
BACHELOR QUARTERS for Fall. Large,
comfortable single room for two grad
students. Private entrance, bath, gar-
age, refrigerator. Located in quiet
residential neighborhood. Telephone
2-7886.
DELUXE Bachelor Apt. Private entrance.
Semi-private bath. Between Ypsi and
Ann Arbor. $67.50 a month. Ph. 2-9020.
ACCOMMODATIONS for Fall are avail-
able for men students now in large
double rooms in house 5 minutes
from campus. Call 3-0849, 406 Packard.
APARTMENTS, roomettes, or rooms by
day or week for campus visitors.
Campus Tourist Homes, 518 E. Wil-
liam St. Phone 3-8454.
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Ride to U.P. Leave after 4
p.m., Aug. 13. Ph. 202 Hayden, E.Q.
I

TRANSPORTATION
WE WANTED to Washington, D.C. -
Leaving August 16, 17, or 18. Call
2-9918.
DRIVING NEW YORK CITY--Thursday
morning. Take 1 or 2 passengers.
Call 2-7392.
PERSONAL
THERE'S NOT much more time for
students and faculty to subscribe at
summer special rates to Time ($3),
Life ($4), and numerous other mags.
For information phone Student Peri-
odical Agency, 6007.
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Taxi cab drivers, full or part
time. Yellow and Checker Cab Co.
113 S. Ashley. Ph. 9382.
MAKE $20.00 DAILY - Sell luminous
name plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass., Free Sample and details.
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, Finished Work, and Rand
Ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
RADIO-PHONO SERVICE
" Fast-In Today, Ready Tomorrow
* Reasonable Rates-Guaranteed Service
" Phonos & Auto Radios Our Specialty
" New,& Used Radios & Phonos
" Custom Auto Radios at Reduced Price
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T.V.
1215 So. University Ph. 7942
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.

JORNY GROTH-slides home with a run for the St. Louis Browns as New York Yankee Catcher
Yogi Berra waits for Mickey Mantle's late throw from center field. The Browns scored three times
in the inning, but the Yankees had an 11-0 lead at the time, and coasted to an 11-3 victory. Berra
collected three hits in helping 'New York's winning effort.
NL ATTENDANCE UP OVER '52:
Extra-Curricular Activities Plague Sox

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 2, Cincinnati 1
Chicago 5, New York 3
Philadelphia 8, St. Louis 2
Brooklyn at Milwaukee (rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Milwaukee
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati
Philadelphia at St. Louis (night)
New York at Chicago (2)

tzmodern dOolinq -

CHICAGO -(A') - The Chicago
White Sox, in hot pursuit of the
pace-setting New York Yankees,
yesterday were vexed by extra-
curricular trouble.
Ferris Fain, Sox first sacker who
led the American League in bat-
ting the past two seasons, had
frosted Manager Paul Richards'
cake of woe with his tavern brawl
of Monday at Washington.
** *
BUT THAT wasn't all.
The Chicago American yester-
day said it was rumored dissen-
sion has hit the Sox and that
when a locker toppled on second
baseman Nellie Fox in Washing-
ton Sunday night, it occurred
duringa clubhouse brawl in-
volving Fain.
Fox was pinned under the lock-
er and suffered leg bruises. He
w described the story as ridiculous.
Fox said the locker tumbled on
him when he reached for some
tooth paste.
ATTENDANTS in the visiting
quarters of Griffith Stadium add-
ed to the confusion by saying Bob
Feller of Cleveland, a beair for
calisthenics, loosened the locker

by doing chinups in previous Tribe
visits.
Fain is facing a $50,000 dam-
age suit resulting from his tav-
ern altercation on the outskirts
of Washington.
He popped a fellow who com-
plained he had one tooth knocked
out and had to have five more
extracted.
FAIN ADMITS he was knocked
down by a punch between the
eyes. The dispute reportedly
stemmed from a dance floor in-
cident.
The suit was filed by James
Judge, 28, of Washington, D.C.
The dispute reportedly started
when Judge attempted to "cut
in" on a dancing partner of
Fain's.
Frank Lane, general manager,
said the Sox planned to "stand
behind Fain in this affair and
give him any legal help he de-
sires."
FAIN rejoined the Sox yester-
day in Philadelphia with a badly
swollen left hand and was ex-
pected to be benched a day or two
by the injury.
Fain left Washington before
a U. S. Marshall could serve
papers on him. The Sox return
to Washington Sept. 16 and 17
and if Fain fails to appear there,
presumably he would be fined
by Richards if he misses those
games.
In an earlier rumble in the Sox
fold, they performed poorly in a
recent game with the Cincinnati
Redlegs at Cooperstown, N. Y.
* * *
IT WAS during that game Man-
ager Richards left the bench to
confer with Lane over the fate
of Pitcher Saul Rogovin, whose
hurling was far below expected
form all season.
It finally was decreed Saul
had a sore elbow and he was
placed on the disabled list.
Richards faced sharp criticism

from writers covering the Sox for
continuing to use Rogovin in face
of his continued mound failure.
NEW YORK-()-The Nation-
al League can attribute its rise in
attendance this season to the
presence of the Milwaukee Braves.
With about two-thirds of the
season gone, the league boasts an
attendance gain of 804,530 over
last year's figure at this time.
Milwaukee alone shows an increase
of 901,802.
THE American League, with
seven of the eight clubs suffering
decreases in attendance, is 814,269
admissions behind its 1952 pace.
Statistics compiled by The
Associated Press through Mon-
day's games disclose an overall
dip of 9,739 in both leagues over
last season. In 1952 at this time
the teams had drawn 9,859,971
and this year they have played
to 9,850,232.
The Braves, who performed in
Boston last season, have attracted
1,096,949 fans to their 48 home
games in Milwaukee. A year ago
only 195,147 Bostonians had turn-
ed out to watch them.
OTHER National League teams
with attendance boosts include
St. Louis, 73,759. Those clubs be-
hind their 1952 pace include Chi-
cago, 164,536; and Cincinnati,
31,954.
All told the league has at-
tracted 5,045,981 fans as com-
pared to last season's figure of
4,241,451.
In the American League the
only team to show an attendance,
improvement has been the NewI
York Yankees. In 48 home games+
the Yanks have drawn 1,034,505+
against 918,446 a year ago.
The teams with attendance de-
clines include Chicago, 82,130; De-
troit, 264,489; and St. Louis, 165,-1
627.
The American League turnout
for 1953 has been 4,804,251, while
the figure a year ago was 5,618,520.

'L Mo' May Abandon Net
Game in Favor of Marriage

Hopes Zoom
For Victory
Over Aussies
NEW YORK -(') - United
States hopes of recapturing the
Davis Cup from Australia are
zooming.
"Our chances are the brightest
in many years," said Col. Jim
Bishop, president of the United
States Lawn Tennis Association.
"THERE ARE several reasons
for optimism, but the greatest ob-
viously is the fine tennis Vic Seixas
and Tony Trabert are playing.
They give us unusual strength
both in singles and doubles."
Jack Kramer gave the ama-
teur brass hats their biggest
boost when he raided the Aussie
ranks and persuaded Frank
Sedgman and Ken McGregor to
turn pro last December.
But even then there was little
optimism over the 1953 challenge
round, for the Aussies had a flock
of "miracle kids" ready to take
over.
* * *

REDUCED
PRICES
at
Sam's Store

NEW YORK-(P)-This is a
prediction. Maureen Connolly will
play about two more years of
amateur tennis. She will tour the
pro circuit a year, then retire per-
haps to rear a bath of Little Mo's.
Now Maureen didn't tell us that.
These are just a few predictions
we plucked strickly on our own be-
tween lines of a dialogue after the
Wightman Cup matches at Rye,
N. Y.
* * *
TODAY LITTLE MO can hit a
tennis ball better than any woman
in the world. Maybe she can hit
one better than any women in the
world ever could, including the
graceful Suzanne Lenglen and the
poker-faced Helen Wills. That's
one of those impossible debates.
She also is 18, loves to ride
horses, play be-bop on the
phonograph and shake an oc-
casional rhumba. She is blonde,
cute as the girl next door and
definite on exactly what she
wants.
It's not Helen Wills' tennis rec-
ords.
* * *
"GRACIOUS, goodness, no, I
have no idea of going after Helen
Wills' records," the San Diego,
Calif., girl said. "In the first place
I don't think I could match them.
In the second place, I don't want
to give tennis that much of my life.
"I don't plan to become a, well,
a traveling, uh, uh . ."
A professional amateur athlete?
we tried to help.
"Well, yes, if you want to put
it that way. I like tennis but I
don't plan to make it my life. I
want to marry and have a family,
and make tennis incidental-inci-
dental maybe to horses."
Maureen's yen for horses may
be readily understood. The
young man with whom she has
been romantically linked-Nor-
man Brinker of Roswell, N. M., a
Navy seaman--is a jumping
horse specialist who was a mem-
ber of the U. S. Olympic eques-
trian team last year,
Maureen herself owns a Ten-
nessee walking horse named Col.
Merry Boy.
GOLFERS
Have fun at the
Partridge Practice Range
We furnish clubs and balls
--21/2 miles out Washte-
now - right on U.S. 23
for I mile.
OPEN EVERY DAY
10A.M.- 1 1 P.M.

"I THINK more than anything
in the world I'd like to become a
good horsewoman, ride in shows
and win ribbons," she said. "Nor-
man is teaching me to ride."
On the oft-rumored marital
plans, the tennis queen insisted
she and Brinker are not engag-
ed but added: "I guess you'd
call him a steady. I'm not going
with anyone else."
As for turning pro, Maureen
will neither confirm nor deny,
leaving you to reach the conclusion
she's not going to pass up that one
big purse opportunity when it grins
at her.
"Tennis is fun," she said. "It
has given me a chance to travel
a lot and see a lot of places while
I am young. Right now I am con-
centrating to make the most of it.
But a full-time career? No in-
deed."

Now! ST

MATINEES 50c
Evenings 70c

Mats. 50c 0 Eves. 70c
I TOMORROW I
DAN DAILUY
"The Girl Next Door"

F

SALE
Short Sleeve
Sport, Shirts
$1.39
Sanforized

READ
AND
USE
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

1/

I

I

SALE-
100% Wool
Swim Briefs
97c
Assorted Colors
SALE
Leisure
Slacks
$2.66
Faded Blue
Sanforized
SALE
Walking
Shorts
$2.66
Sanforized

Cine/na SL L d1
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY AT 7:00 AND 9:00 P.M.
DANA JEANNE DICK VIVIAN
ANDREWS CRAIN HAYMES BLAINE
in RODGERS and HAMMERSTEIN'S
Kaleidoscopic, Gay, Pungent Musical
"STATE FAIR"
in COLOR BY TECHNICOLOR
with Percy Kilbride, Charles Winninger, Fay Bainter
"Rodgers and Hammerstein are two gentlemen who can't touch any-
thing but what it glows. . . 'State Fair' is as gawdy a gild of agriculture
as ever you're likely to see." - New York Times
COMING SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
HUMPHREY BOGART in DASHIELL HAMMETT'S
"THE MALTESE FALCON"
Architecture Auditorium - 50c
CORNER TAPPAN AND MONROE

C
S
t
1
G
r.
f
Y
x
s
F
f'

I

"THIS YEAR, Seixas already has
proved he can handle the world's
best by winning at Wimbledon,"
said Bishop. "He is playing the
greatest tennis of his life."
"Trabert, out of the navy and
back on the circuit, is regaining
his form rapidly and you'll be
surprised at the improvement in
Bernard Bartzen."
Bishop rates Bartzen, a tena-!
cious Texas lefty, as the real dark
horse of the United States squad.
* * *
"HE NOT ONLY is a strong
singles player but could be one of
the world's great doubles stars,"
said Bishop. "He believes in keep-
ing the ball in play. Put him with
a hard-hitting partner and he can
do wonders."
Bartzen, like Trabert, recent-
ly came out of service and is
concentrating on tennis.
The Aussies, however, are equal-
ly confident they can keep the
huge international tennis trophy
for another year. They're over
here in force at the moment com-
peting at Orange, N. J., under the
watchful eye of Manager Harry
Hopman.
"WE'RE ALL in good shape,"
said the affable Hopman, denying
European reports that his youth-
ful charges, especially 18-year-old
Ken Rosewall, were over tennised.

. ,

FAMOUS EVEN BEFORE IT OPENS!

''""""""""

G.ET ABOARD

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HENRY H.
STEVENS, Inc.
LONG *. . *"
DISTANCE

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SALE
Washable Rayon

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