100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 01, 1953 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-08-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rAGF THIZEr.

PAGE TJIRE~

;Roberts

Wins

18th

for

Philadelphia

ion
F ,.

:#

Dodgers Nip Cards; Giants Top Redlegs;
Yanks Pick Up Full Game on White Sox

Major Le-ague
Standin gs
AMERICAN LEAGUE

WILLIAMS SIGNS WITH RED SOX-Ted Williams (left), the
famous American League slugger, smiles happily at Joe Cronin
(centgr), Boston Red Sox general manager, and Tom Yawkey,
wealthy owner of the team, after signing a contract to play for
the Red Sox during the remainder of the 1953 season and thej
1954 campaign. His pay was not disclosed. Williams was released
in Washington from active duty in the Marine Corps air service.
Philly Manager O'..eill Says
Simmons Needs Conditioning

r MILWAUKEE - OP) - There's
nothing wrong with Curt Simmons
that conditioning and better con-
trol won't cure.
* Manager Steve O'Neill of the
Philadelphia Phillies says he is
concerned about the ineffective-
ness of his star left-hander, but
not worried.
*
SIMMONS has been knocked
ut of the box in his last four
tarts and has won one and lost
live since returning to action a few
weeks ago.
The 24-year-old bonus hurler
caught his foot in a power mower
June 4 and had half an inch of
his big toe on the left foot am-
puated. He was out about three
weeks.
"Curt gets tired very quickly,"
said O'Neill. "He hasn't had time
to get back in shape. His arm tires
both in the upper arm and in the
forearm. His toe has healed com-
pletely and hasn't affected his tyre
one bit."
* * .*
SIMMONS says the foot doesn't
bother him. He just can't seem to
get the ball where he wants it. As
a result he has to take something1
off his fast ball to get it over, and
the batters are rapping him hard.
There was some conjecture'
a the time of the power mower
incident that Simmons might
have to alter his style to acquire
a new balancing and pivoting
technique, but O'Neill says such
has not been the case.
"Lack of condition and wildness7
is all that's wrong with Curt. He'lli
have to regain his condition thet
tough way, in game competition,"1
says O'Neill. "I don't like it, but,
there's nothing I can do about it.

It's the only way he'll get the work
he needs."
* * *
SIMMONS, who had a 7-4 won
and lost record before the accident,
seems to have some kind of tough
luck almost every year.
As a bonus kid he had to learn
the ropes without minor league
experience. When he finally got
going in the Phillies' pennant
year of 1950, the Army nabbed
him in the middle of a season in
which he had won 17 games.Last
year he got out of the Army, but
missed spring training. Now the
toe incident.
The doctor who amputated the
.half inch of Curt's toe said that
no normal function of the foot
would be impaired after healing.
He didn't say whether using the
foot in pitching big league baseball
was considered a normal function.
1 'Cinder Star
Ross Hurt in Fall
John Ross, Michigan's ace dis-
tance runner, broke his right
wrist and left elbow yesterday in
a fall from a ladder at a local
dairy where he is employed as an
odd-jobs man during the summer
months.
Ross, a senior from Oakville,
Ontario, was one of the brightest
stars of the Michigan track, team
last year. He won the mile run
in the recent Western Confer-
ence Outdoor Track meet. In the
Big Ten-Pacific Coast meet held
at Ferry Field in late June, Ross
took the mile in 4:13.2.

By The Associated Press
MILWAUKEE - Robin Roberts,
the major league's winningest
pitcher, tossed a four-hitter at
Milwaukee last night for his 18th
victory as Philadelphia clouted
four Braves' pitchers for nine hits
and a 5-1 verdict in the first game
of a twi-night doubleheader. The
Phils scored all their runs off
starter Johnny Antonelli,
DODGERS 2, CARDS 1
ST. LOUIS -- Little Carl Er-
skine, pitching brilliantly in the
pinches, last night scored his
sixth straight victory this month to
give the league-leading Brooklyn
Dodgers a 2-1 triumph over the
St. Louis Cardinals before a tense
24,918 crowd.
Erskine, who allowed only nine
earned runs in 61 innings in those
six victories, gave up six hits and
walked four, but with men in
scoring position he blazed a stLeike-
out pitch that claimed 11 victims
this time. The Brooklyn outfield
had only two putouts as their
right-handed ace brought his won-
and-lost record to 11-4.
To win here for the first time
this season in six tries, the Dodg-
ers collected nine hits, including
three by Junior Gilliam, but they
needed an error to score their
first run off Gerry Staley, who
suffered his fifth defeat against
13 victories.
After Gilliam led off the game
with a double, third baseman Ray
Jablonski fumbled Gil Hodges'
two-out grounder for the first run.
Billy Coxs pop fly single, his stol-
en base and Gilliam's single with
two down in the second sent across.
what proved to be the winning
run.
* * *
GIANTS 9, REDLEGS 2
CINCINNATI - New Yorks
Larry Jansen, who can just about
beat Cincinnati by throwing his
glove out on the mound, recorded
his 10th victory last night and fifth
straight this season over the Red-
legs, 9-2.
Al Dark and Hank Thompson
sweetened Jansen's path to victory
by hitting their 11th and 20th
home runs, respectively. The vet-
eran righthander gave up an even
dozen hits, but the only damaging
blow was Hobie Landrith's two-run
homer, his third, in the fourth in-
ning.
Jansen now possesses a lifetime
record of 24 triumphs over Cincin-
nati against only three defeats.
Right fielder Don Mueller also.
starred on the hitting side for the
Giants, driving in three runs with
two doubles, while catcher Sam
Calderones two bagger unloaded
the bases in the fifth.
TIGERS 5, RED SOX 3
BOSTON - Ralph Branca, the
discarded National League right-
hander, kept nine hits fairly well
scattered last night while pitching
the Detroit Tigers to a 5-3 vic-
tory over the Boston Red Sox in

his first Fenway Park start. The INDIANS 12, ATHLETICS
Tigers clinched it for him in the PHILADELPHIA - The Cleve-
fifth by driving Bill Henry out land Indians, with Wally Westlake
of action, collecting five straight hits, cooled
The Tigers totaled seven hits, off the pesky Philadelphia Athlet-
including a single and double by ics last night 12-6.
Ray Boone, as the Red Sox used The Indians, smarting from two
four pitchers. The last of the Bos- losses out of three tires against
ton flingers was Ben Flowers, who the New York Yankees, banged
was used in relief for the seventh starter Harry Byrd.and relief er Joe
consecutive game. He now has tied Coleman for six runs in the sec-'
the American League record Wash- ond inning to cinch the game.
ington's Firpo Marberry set for Just for good measure they add--
such activity. ed three more tallies each in the
The Red Sox, who had lost four sixth and seventh innings after the
straight, gave Henry a 2-0 lead in A's had fought back to within a
the third, thanks to a pair of er.- one-run 'margin at 6-5.
rors by Gerry Priddy. Reliefer Dave Hoskins won his
But a walk to Boone, Bob Nie- fourth against one loss.
man's double and Jim Delsing's * * *
single tied the count in the fourth. SENATORS 2, WHITE SOX 0
The Tigers added their fifth run WASHINGTON - Bob Porter- ,
against Ivan Delock in the sev- field's sixth shutout, a sparkling
enth when Harv Kuenn singled three-hit effort, stopped the Chi-
and Boone lashed a two-bagger cago White Sox, 2-0 last night
into left-center. as Washington snapped Virgil
* * * Trucks' string of victories at
YANKS 11, BROWNS 5 eight.
NEW YORK - The New York The loss dropped Chicago 512
Yankees gave the last-place St. games back of the league-leading
Louis Browns their usual Yankee New York Yankees.
Stadium welcome yesterday, blast- Trucks suffered his first defeat
ing Marlin Stuart and Lou Kret- since joining the Sox in mid-June.
low for 12 hits and an 11-5 vic- He yielded six hits and both of
tory. Seven of the runs were un- the Senators' run before being lift-
earned. ed for a pinch hitter in the eighth
It was the 13th time the league- inning. Gene Bearden took over.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 11, St. Louis 5
Washington 2, Chicago 0
Cleveland 12, Philadelphia 6
Detroit 5, Boston 3
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Boston
St. Louis at New York
Cleveland at Philadelphia
Chicag6 at Washington (night)

W L
New York ..66 33
Chicago . ...61 39
Cleveland ..57 42
Boston.....57 45
Washington 48 53
Philadelphia 43 56
Detroit .....35 64
St. Louis . . .34 69

Pet.
.667
.610
.576
.559
.475
.434
.354
.330

NATIONAL
W
Brooklyn 64
Milwaukee 56
Philadelphia 52
New York 51
St. Louis 52
Cincinnati 45
Chicago 34
Pittsburgh 31

LEAGUE
L Pet.
33 .660
41 .577
41 .559
42 .548
43 .547
53 .459
60 .362
72 .301

GB
5% 4
9
101/2
19
23
31
34

GB
8
10
11
11
19 /
28% V
36

MICPHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-'4a1
HOURS: 1 t. 5 P M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1,96
3 .70 1 78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3,92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. doily.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-uad I z.
eveningb F n ed
Nickels Arcade or Nickels Arcade and
Hill. Reward. Call 2-2610.
FOR SALE
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS $1 79.
Skip-dents, sanforied hites a
assorted colors. Sam's Store, 122^as
Washington St.
SMALL walnut gateleg table $40 One
large oak sideboard $5,00. One large
double-coil springs $15.00. One up-
holstered chair $1.00. One large wal
nut veneer table and ive ca
One wool rug $6.5. Two largex wal ?nuti
veneer bufets, $15 each. One small
folding steel cot ,10 00. Large daven-
port with green leatherette. $15. Two
doll high chairs, $2.50 each. Phone
2-9020. s - ie
CANARIES and Parakeets. Birdal.plds
and cages. 526 .Seventha at XV. Mad-
ison, Mrs. Louise Rfis
FORD 1949 CUSTOM 8 TUDOR-Orig1in-
al owner. Excel]lent cOnti !on, 59
3-1511 Ext. 663 or 1420e on
3-8775.
SOLVE YOUR HOUSING PRO IE
ROOMY 33 FOOT TR AILER ;i1O)d
ALL MODERN CONVEINCES.AS
TRAILFR, 2ND ROW, WOODSIDE
TRAILER PARK. HWY. 112.
EAST OF S. STATE ST. PHONE 3-1511,
EXT. 2784. W. SYLVESTFTR.
MOTORIZED BICYCLES-Iri ':la -gearedr
Hercules with Minimotor. U'ed 2u.
One man's, one womnan's.1"1hon1 Lev-'
enthal, Ext. 2168
FOR R ENT

READ
DAI LY

TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Milwaukee
New York at Cincinnati
Pittsburgh at Chicago
Brooklyn at St. Louis (night)

leading Yanks had thumped their
favorite sparring partners in 15
meetings. This time it was all over
early with New York rolling up an
8-0 lead in two innings.
The inept Browns contributed.
four errors to the afternoon's non-
sense witnessed by 6,981 fans, one
of the smallest Stadium turnouts
of the year. Many left early. So
did some of the first string Yan-
kees as manager Casey Stengel re-
laxed with a big lead.
Jim McDonald, an ex-Brownie,
pitched an easy-going eight hitter.
His only real trouble came in the
third and eighth innings.
Two Pro Teains
Battle for Kissell
OTTAWA - (4) - The acting
secretary of Cleveland Browns was
in Ottawa yesterday concerning
what may develop as professional
football's hassle of the year.
He is Sterling Newell Jr., a law-
yer. He conferred for two hours
with James P. McCaffrey, presi-
dent of the Ottawa football club.
The talks involved burly, 250-
pound lineman John Kissell who
both the Browns and the Ottawa
Rough Riders claim to have under
contract.
* * *
"KISSELL IS the property of
Cleveland Browns," Newell said,
"and we'll instigate a lawsuit im-
mediately to protect our interests."
He said Kissell, a starting
tackle last season with the
Browns, signed a 1953 contract
with the Cleveland organization
some time ago.

TRANSPORTATION
N A IDPERS to W s5higton,
.1)C A1 'st.1or 4. Call Jim Black-
HELP WANTED
IDEAL year around Job available to one
or ;wo students. Full time summers,
part time winters. Some skill in
Paning, carpentry, and mechanics
reqied. Good sales ersonality e.j-
Pea .Phon~e 2-287, evenings Jr
WA N rED-Taxi cab drivers, full or part
time )-(,Y!low and Chleciter Cab Co.
113 . Ashley. Ph. 9382.
BUSINESS SERVICES
X ASHING, inished Work, and Hand
Ironig Cotton dresses a specialty.
Rult dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ng separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-6020.
RADIO-PIIONO SERVICE
* Fast-In Today, Ready Tomorrow
* Reasonable Rates-Guaranteed Service
* Phonos & Auto Radios Our Specialty
* New & Used Radios & Phonos
e Custom Auto Radios at Reduced Price
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T.V.
1215 So. University Ph. 7942
EXPERT TYPIST - Rates reasonable,
Prompt service. 914 Mary Street.
3-4449.
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Ph. 7590. 830 8. Main.

AND USE
CLASSIFI EDS

SOverall Team Balance Makes
Stengel's Boys Tough To Beat

By WHITNEY MARTIN
NEW YORK-(VP)-"You might
call it a triumph of the average
ball player," the man said, and he
was speaking of the New York
Yankees.
At the moment the New York-
ers were methodically chewing up
the Cleveland Indians.
* * *
WHAT MADE the remark un-
usual that it came from a Cleve-
land follower.
As far as he was concerned
the Yankees could be dipped
head first into a bucket of water
three times and pulled out twice,
but he was a realist and refused
to let his feelings interfere with
his judgment.
"Look at this," he said, running
a stubby finger down the runs-bat-
ted-in list of the New York squad.
"Eleven players have batted in
more than 20 runs.
* * *
"NOW TAKE Cleveland," he
continued, running down the In-
dian roster. "Only six players have
batted in more than 20.
We have fellows such as Al
Rosen and Larry Doby and Bob-

by Avila and Dale Mitchell who
knocks in runs, but if something
happens to one or two of them-
pfft--who's going to get the run-
ners home?"
He wasn't denying that the Yan-
kees were without stars, he point-
ed out.
* * *
HE RECOGNIZED the out-
standing qualities of such athletes
as Yogi Berra and Phil Rizzuto,
and the potentialities of Mickey
Mantle.
But his point was that the
Yankee power was so evenly bal-
anced that if one or two or three
men failed to hit there were
plenty of others able to take up
the slack.
It's a situation we had noted oft-a
en. In a night game when the Ber-
ras and Mantles and Woodlings I
and Bauers were having their
troubles at the plate, Billy Martin
or Joe Collins or Gil MacDougald
would come through.
And there always is Johnny

ACCOMMODATIONS for 1:Fall are henetuviii'- -
ae for men al sFi~l n in L r
double rooms in house 5 minutes!
from campus. Call 3-0849. 406 Packard.
APARTMENTS, roomettes, or rooms by
day or week for caipus visitors,
Campus Tourist Homes, 518 E, Wil-
liam St. Phone 3-8454.
DELUXE Bachelor Apt. Private entrance.
Semi-private bath. Between Ypsi and
Ann Arbor. $67.50 a month. Ph. 2-9020.
BACHELOR QUARTERS for Fall. Large.
comfortable single room for two grad
students. Private entrance, bath, gr
age, refrigerator. Locat ed in quiet
residential neighborhood Telephone
2-7886.
HAIRSY IN
FOR MEN AND WOMEN
Featuring ! Latest Creations
* 8 Artists1
0 No Waiting
The Daseola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre

Ending Tonight
"THE LADY
WA NTS MINK"
with
DENNIS O'KEEFE
EVE ARDEN
RUTH HUSSEY
and
"A PERILOUS
JOURNEY"
starring
VERA RALSTON
DAVID BRIAN
SCOTT BRADY
STARTING SUNDAY
LIM ITS"
with
BOB HOPE
MICKEY ROONEY
MARILYN MAXWELL

Mize,
pinchl
21 run

a part-time player and
hitter who has knocked in
s.
ii1

.......

now

U

9

PAR-BUSTING AT TAM:
Activity Marks Midwest Golf, Tennis Tournaments

"BEGUILING!"
-N.Y. Times

Late Show Tonight 11 P.M,

i

CHICAGO - (IFo) - Golf's top- men's amateur bracket with 143
drawer tournament pros made although soaring to a 75 after an
their move in the $25,000 All opening 68. A stroke behind was
American meet at Tam O'Shan- the defending champion Frank
ter yesterday with a par-busting Stranahan with a 70 for 144.
frolic led by Porky Oliver with a * * *
second round 65. KALAMAZOO - (P) - John

The rotund Oliver, whose oper-
ing 73 Thursday left him eating
dust in the stampede for the $3,-
420 first prize, slammed into a
tie for the 36-hole lead at 138 with
Jimmie Clark and Dave Douglas.

Lesch, a tall, 17-year-old towhead
from Los Angeles, sprang the big-
gest upset of the National Junior
and Boys Tennis Championships
yesterday by knocking off top-
seeded junior Jon Douglas, 4-6,
10-8, 6-4, in the quarterfinal round.

HETTLEMAN polished off 13th-
seeded Richard Schuette of
Houston, Tex., 6-4, 6-4. Franks
had it even easier in eliminating
John Cranston of San Marino,
Calif., 6-3, 6-2.
In the boys' division all the
semifinalists will be seeded stars.
Top-ranked Donald Dell of
Bethesda, Md., moved through the
quarterfinals with a 6-1, 4-6, 6-2
win over Earl Buchholz of St.
Louis. The middle set was Dell's
first loss in tournament play this
year, however.
** *
IN OTHER matches Allen Sil-
verman of Brooklyn, N.Y., defeated
Spencer Allen of Atlanta, 6-3, 6-1;
Norman Perry of Los Angeles de-
feated Harry Thompson of Atlan-
ta, 6-4, 6-3, and Richard Hoehn of

Hanover, N.H., defeated P. Kay
Champion of Dayton, 6-4, 6-1.
The junior semi-finals will
match'Lesch and Moss and Het-
tleman and Franks.
Dell will face seventh-seeded Sil-
verman and Perry (2) will meatj.
Hoehn (3) in the boys' semifinals.
DID YOU KNOW: That football
coach Bennie Oosterbaan begins
his 25th year at the University of
Michigan this autumn? He has
served as head coach since 1948.
During his first season in that
capacity, the Wolverines won nine
straight games and a national
championship. Oosterbaan was
honored as "Coach of the Year,"
a remarkable accomplishment for
a first year man.

"REFRSHING!"
--Journal-Amer.
"A DELIGHT!"
-World-Tel.
"ENCHANTING!"
-N.Y. Mirror
"CHARMING!"
-Time Magazine
"IRRESISTIBLE!"
-Cue Magazine

Douglas, a fellow Californian
CLARK, 32-year-old ex-Marine from Santa Monica, breezed
from Laguna Beach, Calif., dupli- through the first set and had
cated his first round 69 while match point within his grasp sev-
Douglas, the PGA executive from eral times in the second.
Newark, Del., blasted a 67 to go * * *
with his 71.

However, Oliver's bid with a
blistering 33-32, seven under pat'
for the trampled 6,900-yard
course and only two strokes off
the record, was the most sensa-
tional golf of the meet thus far.
On the heels of the leaders in
the bunched front-runners were
.such veterans as Lawson Little of
Pebble Beach, Calif., who hooked
a 69 to his first round of 70, and
Bob Toski, North Hampton, Mass.,
who welded a 34-32-66 to his 73.
AMONG those grouped at 140
were Sam Snead with a second

BUT LESCH, growing stronger
every game, then took command
and never trailed in the decisive
third set.
In the same quarterfinal
bracket Jerry Moss of Jackson-
ville, Fla., backed up his hard
services with sharp net play to
def eat Mark Jaffe of Bay City,
Mich., 6-3, 6-4.
Other quarterfinal survivors were
Kalman, Buzzy Hettleman, the
surprising unseeded Duke Univer-
sity student from Baltimore, and
third-seeded Mike Franks of Los
Angeles.

K

COMPLETE NEW SHOW TONIGHT
Cinema SL ui"Q

:

YOU'LL FALL IN LOVE WITH "LIL
in this romance-with-music
that's as happy-hearted and
carefree as its hit song
. e Hi-Liii HI-Lo"!.
presents
COLOR BY
LEsLIE\
CA SI TARRING
MEL JEAN PIERRE
STnnnn ITTI I T1 f Yn

TONIGHT
SUNDAY

at 7 and 9 P.M.
at 8 P.M. Only

JEAN
ARTHUR

and

WILLIAM
HOLDEN

I

I

I II in WESLEY RUGGLES Il I

-

U n n

" ~g~4~~l ~5:k~.i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan