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July 18, 1952 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1952-07-18

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FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

M

SPORTS RETORTS
By BOB MARGOLIN, Co-Sports Editor
S PORTS AND POLITICS are mixed well these days.
In an article in Collier's Dean Cromwell, past Olympic track
coach, tells of many Olympic incidents that have had internation-
al repercussions. Among them was the time in London in 1908
when an American, John Hayes, was awarded victory in the 24
mile marathon after Dorando Pietri of Italy was helped across
the finish line by officials. The incident served to bring the Olym-
pic Games to the forefront of the news for the first time since
the competition began twelve years earlier.
More famous was the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin when Jesse
Owens, the great Negro sprinter from Ohio State, disproved to all the
world-and in the presence of the Fuehrer himself-Hitler's theory
of a master race.
**
HOWEVER, FOR 'sheer weight of political publicity, none can
match the Games now being held in Finland, witlhin the shadow of the
Iron Curtain.
This is the first time that Russia is entering a team in the
international competition and many people are wondering if Rus-
sia will attempt to prove it has a "master race" of its own. An
answer to this question comes from a Russian, Sergei Stemasov,
member of the Russian sports ministry. Mr. Stemasov anticipates
American sports superiority in 1952, but warns that Russia will be
much stronger in 1956 "when we will be able to compete on an
equal footing with the United States."
There is still much speculation on what will happen when the
American and Russian personalities clash on the field of battle. Al-
ready pre-game relations between Russian and American athletes
are making sports headlines.
.However, the Russian camp was recently thrown open to visi-
tors and relations have been surprisingly amicable. Whether this
new friendship will continue or whether the bitter antagonism of
the political ideologies will return is a difficult question to answer.
Perhaps the best word of advice came from the San Francisco
Chronicle which pleaded for the fans and sporots writers to slow down
on the "beat Russia" angle. "American fans and news gatherers
should keep the cold war pressure off our boys-the 400 meter run
unconfused with foreign policy," the Chronicle urged.
To this we can only say Amen!.

Nationalists Refuse
* * * *~

To Compete

CLASSIFIEDS

Action Comes After China
Reds Get Invitation To Play

RUSSIAN OLYMPIC CANOEISTS DOCK AFTER PRACTICE
Dodgers Defeat Reds, 2-1,
In Eleven; Tigers Bow, 1-0

Collegiate Cuts
to please
7 BARBERS
NO WAITING
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater-

IM Contest
An 8-7 victory over the Hard-
rocks last night gave Rod's Boys
a tie for first place in iM softball
League IV along with the Bartend-
ers and the Jokers.
Playoffs in all leagues begin
Monday.

ARE YOU ELIGIBLES
In Ann Arbor it's the
VFW CLUB
. Dancing Fri. & Sat. Nights
* Two Fine Orchestras
* Mary Lou, Vocalist

V.J.

Members
and Guests

UVrO NAILE.
Your Singing Host
--HALL

114 E. William St.
Between Main and
Founrth Ave.
PHONE 7191
s OPEN
Daily 10 A.M. to 10 P.M.
Sundays Noon to 7 P.M.

Ph. 2-3972
RENTALS & BANQUETS -
W HAT'S THAT?
You say I can
drive right thru
for
WINE -- BEER
SNACKS-SOFT DRINKS

CINCINNATI - (A) -- It took
Brooklyn 11 innings to beat Cin-
cinnati, 2-1, yesterday in about as
wild a game as has been played
this season in the National League.
Neither starting pitcher Preach-
er Roe nor Herman Wehmeier was
around at the finish. And neither
was Jackie Robinson, Dodger sec-
ond baseman, nor his successor,
Billy Cox.
CARL FURILLO drove in both
of the Dodger runs.
Brooklyn scored in the sev-
enth when Roy Campanella
walked, advanced to second
when Roy McMillan muffed
Andy Pafko's liner, and scored
when Furillo singled to left.
Cincinnati tied it in the ninth.
Ted Kluszewski led off with a
single and Eddie Pellagrini was
sent in to run for him. Pellagrini
promptly worked a delayed steal.
* * .*
THEN CAME the fireworks. Sec-
ond baseman Robinson, enraged
at the decision, ran toward the
pitcher's mound, then back toward
second, stopped and kicked his
glove high in the air. He was
promptly ejected.
Billy Cox replaced him. Andy
Seminick singled and Pellagrini
stopped at third. Willard Marshall
batted for Grady Hatton and flied
to Dick Williams, Pellagrini scor-
ing after the catch.
When Roy McMillan hit safely,
the Preacher was replaced by Joe
Black, who stopped the Reds for
the second successive day.
Frank Smith took the mound in
the tenth for Cincinnati and got
out of trouble.
Minutes later Cox was kicked
out of the game for arguing with
an umpire.
Bobby Morgan went to second
and Williams came in from left
field to take over third base.
George Shuba was sent to left
field.

WASHINGTON-Jim Busby's
single with one out in the ninth
inning scored Frank Shea from
second base to give Washington
a 1-0 victory over Detroit last
night.
Shea and Hal Newhouser each
yielded five hits as Shea won
his sixth straight decision and
his ninth of the year.
PHILADELPHIA - Lefthander
Tommy Byrne led a 16-hit St.
Louis attack last night with a
pair of singles, a double and homer
as the Browns trounced the Phila-
delphia Athletics, 9 to 5, in the
first game of a twi-night twin bill.
NEW YORK - Allie Reynolds
was knocked out of the box for
the first time this season as the
Cleveland Indians racked him up
for six runs on as many hits in
the two innings he worked and
went on to defeat the New York
Yankees, 11-6, in the first game of.
last night's twi-night double-
header.
PITTSBURGH - Ralph Kiner
smashed his 17th home run with
one aboard in the ninth inning to
give the last-place Pittsburgh Pi-
rates a hard-fought 4-2 victory
over Philadelphia in the nightcap
of a doubleheader yesterday after
Rookie Cal Hogue had pitched
four-hit ball to whip the Phillies
2-1 in the first game.
Ted Wilks, who relieved For-
rest Main in the ninth inning,
got credit for his fifth triumph
against four losses. Righthander
Karl Drews lost his tenth game.
Ie's won five.
The 24-year-old Hogue walked
six batters and struck out three in
notching his first major league
win. The victory snapped a five-
game Bue losing streak.
Righthander Russ Meyer, who
the Pirates battered for 11 hits,
was charged with his 11th defeat
against six wins in the first con-
test.
* * *
BOSTON - Sammy White's
home run and a double by
George Kell, with one on in the
third inning, gave the Boston
Red Sox a 2-1 victory over the
Chicago White Sox yesterday.
Chicago drove two Boston pitch-
ers from the mound in the ninth
but the rally was snuffed by Ray
Scarborough.
*T*
CHICAGO-Pitcher Vern Bick-
ford won his own game yesterday
with a two-out seventh inning
single to score rookie third base-
man Ed Mathews as the Boston
Braves defeated the Chicago Cubs,
1-0.
The win gave the sixth placers
a 2-1 series edge. The victory was
Bickford's fifth and snapped a
four-game losing streak to the
Cubs.
Read Daily Classifieds

By TED SMITS
HELSINKI -()- After heated
debate, the ruling body of the
Olympics threw open the doors
yesterday to teams from both Red
and Nationalist China, but the
Nationalists refused to accept the
terms and decided on a boycott.
At best, Red China can compete
only in swimming. With Red
China in, there will be 70 nations
and 8,000 athletes. The games
open officially tomorrow.
THE ACTION of the Interna-
tional Olympic Committee over-
ruled J. Sigfrid Edstrom, its pres-
ident, who announced recently
that neither Chinese faction could
compete because of non-payment
of dues.
Gun Sun Hoh, who pleaded
the case of Nationalist China
before the committee, protected
the "unlawful decision" and re-
fused to let his team partici-
pate.
He even told the committee he
feared one of its members, Tung
Shou I, had been arrested and
probably killed in Communist
China. He said he thought a cable
sent to the committee and pre-
sumably signed by him was faked.
* * *
WHILE BITTER political ar-
gument went on there was enough
preliminary activity to keep alive
the athletic side of the games.
Canada qualified for the final
basketball tournament by win-
,ning its third elimination game,
downing Egypt, 63-57. Bulgaria
qualified by defeating Cuba, 62-
56, after trailing at the half,
29-30. Romania was definitely
knocked out of the round robin
by Italy, 53-39. The Phillippines
qualified for the finals by beat-
ing Hungary, 48-35.
The United States, as defend-
ing Olympic champions and Soviet
Russia, as European champions,
* * *
Red Hoopsters
Scare Nobody
HELSINKI-P)-The Russians
took the wraps off their vaunted
Olympic basketball team yester-
day, and scared nobody..
They are a fast,aggressive team,
apparently hard as pine knotstand
they'll take any blue ribbon prize
for pre-game calisthenics. But in
the big tournament, opening July
25, the Americans will whomp 'em.
THIS WAS the impression of
two Associated Press men, the on-
ly outsiders to attend the Reds'
hour and a half opening workout
at the Observatory Tennis Hall.
The Russians brought their own
ball-a red one.
Apparently they've c o p i e d
their technique from the Globe
Trotters, who have been touring
Europe. They try all sorts of
fancy ballhandling, click with it
only a small percentage of times.
The Reds are European cham-
pions and they're rated the strong-
est threat to America's unbroken
Olympic cage supremacy. But they
haven't the size or finesse to chal-
lenge Uncle.Sam's giants seriously.
The Russians use a shifting zone
defense, moving two and some-
times three men into the breach
when a foe breaks for the basket.
Despite their lack of great height,
they leap high and are good on
rebounds.

automatically qualified for the
final tournament along with eight
other teams.
Both Chinese teams \vere in-
cluded in the absketball elimina-
tion draw but neither showed up.
RAIN DID NOT prevent the
powerful American track team
from taking a brisk workout.
Harrison Dillard, who won the
100 meters in the 1948 games
and aims at the 10 meter hur-
dles this time, ran through two
flights of 60 yard high hurdles
in the excellent times of :07.4
and :07.3. His form was superb.
All of .the 400 meter and 1,600
meter relay runners worked on
baton passing. The teams have
not yet been selected yet.
Stanky Gets,
Three Day
S us pens ion
ST. LOUIS-(P)- St. Louis
Cardinal Manager Eddie Stanky
was suspended for three days for
"offensive gestures" to umpire
"Babe" Pinelli in Wednesday
night's game with the New York
Giants.
Cardinal shortstop Solly Hemus
was fined $50 for his "conduct" in
the game.
BOTH WERE notified of the
action in telegrams from National
League President Warren C. Giles.
During Stanky's suspension,
Cardinal coach John Riddle will
manage the club.
In the telegram to Stanky, Giles
said the umpire's report noted that
"no profanity was used by you and
that has been taken into consid-
eration."
Stanky was ejected in the
sixth inning of last night's game
while protesting umpire Pinellis
call on balls and strikes. Hemus
followed him out of the game in
the same inning.
Cardinal Coach Buzzy Wa es al-
so was put out of the game, but
no action had been taken against
him.
Official Scorer
Aids Seminick
CINCINNATI-(RP)-The official
scorer took an error and an un-
wanted record away from catcher
Andy Seminick of the Cincinnati
Reds yesterday.
Seminick was charged with
three errors in the first inning
of Wednesday night's game
against the Brooklyn Dodgers, a
National League record for one
inning.
Yesterday the scorer changed
his decision and ruled that the
second error, on a throw to sec-
ond in an effort to catch Billy Cox
stealing, should have been charged
against second baseman Grady
Hatton instead of Seminick.
That put Seminick in a record-
equalling bracket with many other
National League catchers who
have made two errors in one inn-
ing.

r

11

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to o line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST--Gray Kitten in vicinity of East
William and Thompson. Call No. on
his tag or bring to 512 E. William,
Back apt.
FOR SALE
ANTIQUE CHAIRS - 1 Hitchcock, 1
Duncan Fyfe, 1 arm Windsor, 1 comb
back windsor. 1 tilt top table. Mis-
cellaneous objects: candle sticks,
lamps, dishes, fixtures. 1918 Day Ph.
2-1710.
ART SALE private collection, oils, water
colors, portfolios, books. 1918 Day,
Phone 2-1710.
FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE APT. near Campus to
sublet July 15 to Sept. 15. Real bar-
gain f~r right tenant. 3-1479 evenings.
FRATERNITY or sorority house for
rent, approved for twenty-five. Close
to campus. Write Box 17.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

-- -

MUSIC SHOPS
Operated by Musicians for M~usic Lhovers

The Market Research Department
or
THE PROCTOR & GAMBLE CO.
has a number of openings for young women col-
lege graduates between 21 and 26 to travel about
the country conducting consumer surveys with no
selling involved after a training period of approxi-
mately 7 months in Cincinnati, Ohio. Prerequisites
include a driver's license and ability to do simple
arithmetic. In addition to salary while traveling, all
expenses are paid.
For further information, -write:
Miss.VIRGINIA WEISS
MARKET RESEARCH DEPARTMEN:F
The Proctor & Gamble Company
Gwynne Building
CINCINNATI 1, OHIO

FOR RENT
AVAILABLE -- A new 3-room de-
luxe apartment which accommodates
four. Completely furnished, electric
stove and refrigerator. Private en-
trance. $95 per month. Will rent for
summer. Need a car. Call 2-9020.
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
tions at The Campus Tourist Homes
now. 518 E. William. Phone 3-8454.
ROOMS FOR RENT
4 STUDENTS--large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
room available for music students.)
$125 a month. Also single room. 320 E.
Washington after 4 P.M.
SINGLE ROOM, cooking & laundry
privileges for girl; call 312 S. Thayer
after 6 P.M.
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and'de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
TYPING - Reasonable rates. Accurate,
Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 S. Main.
MENS' USED BIKES and used radios.
Ann Arbor Radio & T.V. 1215 So.
Univ., Ph. 7942. 1; blocks east of
East Engineering.
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - home -- Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T V
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
11/ blocks east of East Engin.
HELP WANTED
MAKE $20.00 DAILY. Sell luminous
name plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass., free sample and details.

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WASHINGTON
STORY

TICKET SALE
for
Dept. of Speech
Plays
July 23-26
"Wi nte rset"
By Maxwell Anderson
July 30-Aug. 2-
"Second
Threshold"
By Philip Barry
Aug. 7, 8, 9-11
"The Merry
Wives of
Windsor"
an opera in conjunction

ENDS TONIGHT
Plus--
Exposes the Blood-Money Mob!

che~aSLqud
presents
REX HARRISON
in
"THE HOST
AND MS UR
A prim widow and the ghost of a salty sea captain indulge
m a strange and hilarious romance.
"A jolly film"--N.Y. TIMES
GENE eith GEORGE
TIERNEY SANDERS
DIRECTED BY JOSEPH MANKIEWICZ
(All About Eve; Letter To Three Wives)
Also
TECHNICOLOR
CARTOON FESTIVAL
4 - WARNER BROS. MERRIE MELODIES - 4

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An Estimate Returned
Upon Receipt of Coupon

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SUMMER HOURS 12:30 to 5:00

Closed Saturdays
Other Hours by Appointment

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