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July 10, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JY 10, 1952

Convention
Excitement
Fills Hotels
(Continued from Page 1)
have been staging very active
demonstrations.
A rumor that appears to have
some foundation was picked up
today in Ike headquarters-that
Stassen was planning to withdraw
on the second ballot, turning his
ballots over to Eisenhower.
THE CONRAD Hilton, general
rConventionheadquarters, was by
far the most lively place in Chi-
cago yesterday.
Au uninhibited spirit of
friendliness seldom seen in Chi-
cago generally prevailed. Any-
where on the busy streets,
strangers wearing "I Like Ike"
buttons would stop to argue with
those branded as their op-
ponents, or compare notes with
those with whom they agreed.
Parades and rallies, led by the
Inevitable brass band, added to
the carnival atmosphers. These
seemingly spontaneous demonstra-
tion originate high in the Hilton
Hotel, where staffs of public re-
lations experts have been making
plans for weeks.
Balloons, helicopters, banners,
sound trucks, floats, pennants and
buttons complete the colorama
wVhich is Chicago today.
One of the most interesting as-
pects of the convention mobs to
a campus representative has been
the number of Michigan students
involved. Anywhere on the street
or in a hotel lobby you are liable
to bump into your roommate's fi-
ancee, a fraternity brother, or a
classmate.
Coming from as far as New
York, these students have joined
the vast multitude in Chicago to
be a part of this great political
spectacle.
Totalitarian
Vews Traced
(Continued from Page 1)
have advanced the totalitarian
ideals in Europe until they pose
the chief threat to this country
today, Viereck stated.
POINTING OUT that we are
losing the spiritual and intellec-
tual fight to Russia because the
cream of our society is being se-
duced by their idealogy, Viereck
asserted that we must live in "two
world at once."
We must exist in the cold, prac-
tical one of the Russian war-
threat, but we must keep part of
our mind for the spiritual and cul-
tural values which we seek to re-
tain, he said.
Later at 8 p.m. yesterday, Vier-
eck read and discussed selections
of his poetry to a large audience
in the Rackham Amphitheatre.

COMPLEX SCAFFOLD-It took workers of the University Grounds Department two weeks to com-
plete this maze-like structure which will serve as a scaffold to spray-paint the ceiling of the
General Library's Main Reading Room. Painting the central room is the first project of the sum-
mer-long Library redecoration program.
Astrolog ist Backs New 'DV ark Horse'

Band Plans
2 Outdoor
Programs
Two outdoor summer concerts
have been planned for the Uni-
versity Summer Session Band at
7:30 p.m., July 16 and July 24,
with Prof. William D. Revelli con-
ducting.
A special feature of the July
24th concert will be three selec-
tions presented by the combined
forces of the 87 piece University
band, the Detroit Cass Technical
high school band of 85 members
and the Burton Tower carillon
played by Percival Price carefully
synchronized with the bands.
* * *
THIS MASSIVE treatment will
be given to "The Great Gate of
Kiev" from Moussorksky's "Pic-
tures at an Exhibition;" "The Cor-
onation Scene" from the opera
"Boris Godounov," also by Mous-
sorgsky; and "The Bells of St.
Mary's" by Adams.
As the last concert is being
held while the Fourth Annual
National Band Conductors Con-
ference Workshop is in progress,
several guest conductors will
assist Prof. Revelli, Paul Yoder,
well-known arranger and com-
poser from Chicago; Harry Be-
gian, conductor of the Cass
Technical high school band and
James Neilson of Oklahoma
City University are among those
participating.
Termed by Prof. Revelli as "one
of the most promising summer
school bands of recent years" the
1952 Summer Session Band is
composed of students from 20
states and the Panama Canal
Zone. Of the 87 members, 74 are
graduate students.
"The summer band program is
designed to familiarize the band
members, most of whom are band
conductors during the regular
school year, with a larger reper-
toire of good music for their
groups," Prof. Revelli said.
In case of rain on the night of
either concert, the program will
take place at 8:30 p.m. in Hill
Auditorium.
TV Problems
Considered
Problems in TV production of
an educational program series
were discussed by Prof. Garnet R.
Garrison of the speech depart-
ment in a speech assembly yes-
terday.
Speaking from his experience
as Director of Television for the
Yniversity's video education ser-
ies, Prof. Garrison outlined the
difficulties of choosing a suitable
time for broadcasts and organiz-
ing material to be clear and in-
formative as well as entertaining.
The television series, which is
now two years old, has been suc-
cessful experiment in the field of
educational programs.

* * *

By MARILYN DIMES
Prof. Percival Price, University
carilloneur and the world's only
professor of campanology (the
science of ringing bells) will pre-
sent another of his familiar con-
certs at 7:15 p.m. today on the
Baird Memorial Carillon in Bur-
ton Tower.
His program will include: three
Haydn compositions, The Heavens
are Telling from "The Creation,"
Adoro te and Presto from "Piano
Sonata, No. 33;" Trike's Song
From "Eugene Anegin" by Tchai-
kovsky; four modern low country
carillon compositions, Preludium
in F, Fantasia, Variations on an
Old Dutch Air and Ballet; two
songs, Early One Morning and The
Lass with the Delicate Air; and
Invitation to the Dance.
* * *
UNIVERSITY carilloneur since
1939 Prof. Price uses a rare com-
bination of muscle, bells and mu-
sical know-how in presenting his
campus-wide concerts.
Mechanical contrivanees with-
out the aid of electricity are
used to ring the smallest bell
weighing 12 pounds or the larg-
est bell of 12 tons.
The carilloneur, consequently,
doesn't have an easy time of it.
Requiring precise muscular co-
ordination, his fists must move
rapidly from key to key while he

for example his "Concerto for
Carillon and Brasses."
One of Prof. Price's composi-
tions for the carillon has been se-
lected for exhibition at the 1952
Olympics Exhibition of Music,
Helsihki, Finland. Pleased with
the inclusion of his favorite mu-
sical medium, Prof. Price remark-
ed: "It is a tribute to the carillon
to be able to stand alongside other
music in the world."
*' * *
PROF. PRICE has an imposing
list of official recognitions of his
interest in the carillon.
In Europe, he earned the di-
ploma of the Carillon School of
Mechelen, Belgium and after com-
ing to America, has received the
degree of Bachelor of Music at the
University of Toronto.
In 1934 his talent was rewarded
with the Pulitzer Prize in Music,
for his symphony "The St. Law-
rence." Prof. Price describes the
symphony as "romantically re-
lated to the St. Lawrence River."
After having been carillonneur
at the Rockefeller Memorial Car-
illon and Dominion Carillonneur
in the House of Parliament at Ot-
tawa, he came to the University in
1939 to begin his lengthy career
on campus.
Bell ringing, for Prof. Price at
least, has provided the basis for a
novel, busy career.

I

PROF. PERCIVAL PRICE
... 'U' campanologist
* * *
presses his feet on peddle after
peddle and slides his body along
the six-foot bench.
But Prof. Price's energy does
not stop at concert time. He al-
ways has "something in the wind,"
and is already the author of about
50 compositions for the carillon
and his arranged "somewhere in
the neighborhood of 500 to 1000
others."
The carillon-crusader also has
written music combinine the
carillon with other instruments,

I

PRICE TO GIVE CONCERT:
'U' Carilloneur Uses Muscle, Know-How

By JOYCE FICKIES
Another "dark horse" has been
added to the long list of Presiden-
tial hopefuls.
However, this one isn't affiliated
with any political 'arty. She is
the favorite of a writer in a na-
tional astrology magazgne.
THE WRITER, who listed J.
omer To Talk
On Universe
Guy C. Omer, Jr., visiting pro-
fessor from the University of Chi-
cago, will open the astronomy de-
partment's summer program of
visitor's nights at 8:30 p.m. to-
morrow in Rm. 3017 Angell Hall
with a talk on,"The Birth of our
Universe."
Following the talk, the student
observatory on the fifth floor of
Angell Hall will be open until
10:30 p.m. for observations with
the telescopes and binoculars of
Mars and a star cluster if the
weather permits,
Children are welcomed but they
must be accompanied by adults,
department officials said.

Edgar Hoover and other FBI of-
ficials, as those who could verify
her article, described her candi-
date as "the only person in the
world best suited to bring to fru-
ition the next step in mankind's
slow, steady progress back to Per-
fection."
The candidate's name is Ellen
Linea W. Jensen, a Chicago-born
woman of Swedish descent.
According to the article, Mrs.
Jensen was chosen by a sort of
celestial screening process as the
"highest evolved soul on earth."
24 Engineers
GeIt.All-A's
Twenty-four students in the
College of Engineering received
all-A records during the spring
semester, bringing the total. num-
ber of all-A students in seven col-
leges and schools on campus to
135.
All students with the honor rec-
ord carried at least 12 hours of
academic work.
Those from Michigan are: Fran-
cis G. Bartlett, '52E, Raymond
Jennings, William Sherman, '54E,
Edward O. Gilbert, '52E, Elmer G.
Gilbert, '52E, James L. Roof, '54E,
Joseph Yope, '54E, Olexa M. Bi-
laniuk, V inc e nt Dambrauskas,
'54E, Ward D. Getty, 55E, Fred-
erick M. Waltz, '54E, and William
J. Kelly.
Other in-state students are:
Dale Haskins, '52E, Martin W.
3tory, '52E, Lawrence R. Mack,
'54E, John C. Hensel, '52E, and
Robert E. Bacon, '55E.
Out-of-state students are: Rich-
ard E. Balzhizer, '54E, James Ry-
an, John E. Merow, '52E, Fred C.
Shure, '55E, and James R. Shaner,
'53E.
S clhubert Recital
Prof. John Kollen, of the music'
school, will give an all-Schubert
piano recital at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday,
July 15 in Rackham Lecture Hall,

She has been reincarnated in
many great world fugures.
"Among her thousands of re-
incarnations," the article relates,
"the Soul that is Ellen Linea in
this life, has been the Head of
every country which has existed
on this earth, both in a male body
in one life, and in a female body
in another life."
One incarnation, the report
said, was that of George Wash-
ington. Now she is the "Mother
of her Country," it continued.
She is also said to have written
a book some 10,000 years ago in
a previous incarnation, which in-
corporated all of the languages
that have been used on the earth
to this time.
If Ellen Linea is not elected, the
writer concluded, "this country
will fall, grevious and dire things,
will happen, and we will suffer for
thousands of years to come."

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BUT WE ARE

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