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July 10, 1952 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-10

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THURSDAY, JULY 10, 1952

ThE MICHIGAN DjAILY

rAGE T

All-Stars Angry after Rainout
NL Smoulders as Stengel National League Stars Laud

A
I'

Blames Loss on Downpour

Mighty Midget Shantz of AL

PHILADELPHIA-(P)-The tri-
umphant National League All-
Stars should have been happy yes-
terday with their third straight
victory over the American League.
Instead, they were bitter-and
all their bitterness was directed at
their beaten rivals.
* * *
"SO CASEY STENGEL blames
their defeat on the weather?" a
National League All-Star parti-
cipant echoed. "That's a lot of
sour grapes. What's the matter?
Don't they like it when the shoe is
on the other foot?"
"I suppose the raindrops car-
ried those two home-run blasts
by Jackie Robinson angd Hank
Sauer over the wall," the in-
dignant National Leaguer con-
tinued. "If anybody has a beef
about the rain, it should be us.
They would not have scored
either of their two runs if the
ground had not been wet and
slippery."
Earlier, Manager Stengel was
asked to what he attributed the
American's 3-2 defeat in Tues-
day's game that was cut to five
innings because of incessant rain.
"I AIN'T blaming anybody," the
r gnarled old skipper of the New
York Yankees said at first. Then
he ventured, "maybe the rain."
"Can't tell what would have
happened if we'd played out the
game. I had some good men on
the bench ready to send in,
guys like Mickey Mantle, Vic
Wertz, Ferris Fain and Eddie
Yost."
There is no question but what
the rain and muddy field marred
the play, but it didn't appear to

hamper the pitchers and it had
ittle effect, if any, on the Na-
tional League sluggers.
,, * *
NEITHER RAIN, nor snow, nor
sleet would have prevented Sauer's
terrific blast from clearing the
wall with Stan Musial on base in
the fourth inning.
That mighty home hun, a 430-
footer that landed atop the
roof and bounded out of the
premises, equalized the two-run
splurge of the Americans in the
top of the fourth and gave the
Nationals their seventh win in
19 clashes and Manager Leo
Durocher's first in three at-
tempts. Stengel, who has whip-
ped the Nationals in the last
three World Series, has now
dropped the last three All-Star
games.
Coming on top of the robust
four-bagger belted by Jackie Rob-
inson in the first inning, Sauer's
blow proved for the third consecu-
tive year that the balance of pow-
er has definitely swung towards
the older circuit.
' 4 .' *
JACKIE ROBINSON'S inability
to come up with a double-play
grounder in the fourth made pos-
sible both American tallies. The
Brooklyn Dodger second baseman
could not get a firm footing on a
treacherous terrain and Eddie Ro-
binson's hard-hit grounder went
for a single and scored Minnie
Minoso from second. The Chicago
White Sox outfielder had led off
with a solid double just before Al
losen had drawn a base on balls.
Bobby Avila followed with a
hopper behind second that Rob-
inson knocked down bu& couldn't
hold, and Rosen crossed the plate.

Little Bobby Shantz of the Phil-
adelphia Athletics drew the loud-
est praises from the victorious Na-
tional League All-Stars.
The soft-spoken mite tossed
only thirteen pitches for the los-
ing side, but' with them he struck
out three of the senior circuit's
sharpest hitters.
RELIEVING losing pitcher Bob
Lemon in the top of the fifth, the
five-foot, seven-inch, 145-pound
lefty flashed his fast ball through
the downpour to strike out Whitey
Lockman (.307), Jackie Robinson

CASEY STENGEL
*.. .nothing for three

Yankees, Brooklyn Following
Different Pennant Formulas

NEW YORK--P-)-The Brook-
lyn Dodgers and the New York
Yankees are using different "for-
mulas" in their 1952 pennant
drives.
Brooklyn is employing the meth-
od used successfully by the late
John McGraw, once manager of
the New York Giants.
*, * *
McGRAW'S SIMPLE pennant
philosophy was to "beat the bush-
ers." The fiery Giant immortal
brought 10 pennants to the Polo
Grounds.
The Yanks' theory is just the
opposite. The Bombers say,
"Knock off your nearest rival."
The Yanks always seem to reach
the heights in a crucial series.
Brooklyn's four - and - a - half-
game 'lead over the New York
Giants today was built chiefly on
the Dodgers' success against the
sixth, seventh and eighth place

THE DODGERS have won 33
games and lost only one to the
last three teams in the standings.
The Giants have captured 22 and
lost six from the same three clubs.
The Brooks have won only 18
games and dropped 20 against the
other five teams. The Chicago
Cubs are the only other rival the
Brooks hold an advantage over.'
The Dodgers have won six out of
nine from the fourth-place Bruins.
The Yanks, seeking their fourth
straight flag and 19th since 1920,
have won 19 and lost 11 to first-
division opponents and stand 26-18
over the lower-echelon teams.
Iajor League
Standings

(.315) and Stan Musial (.333) in
swift succession.
"The kid is a wonder," mar-
veled Leo Durocher, who piloted
the National Leaguers to their
third straight triumph. "If
that's the kind of stuff he
throws, I'm glad we didn't have
to face him any more."
The three top hitters Shantz
struck out were equally impressed.
"I CAN SEE why he has that
(14-3) record," declared Robin-
son, whose first-inning homer off
starter Vic Raschi gave the Na-
tional League a 1-0 lead. "He
threw me three curves and two
change-ups. And if he had thrown
his fast curve sooner, I'd have
struck out sooner."
Musial, the only hatter to hit
so much as a foul off Shantz,
said the mighty mite of the
Athletics had "a tremendous
assortment."
Lockman paid particular praise
to Shantz' control. "He's really
Co-recreation night will be
held at the Intramural Sports
Building on Friday beginning
at 7:30 p.m. and continuing
until 10:00 p.m. Both students
and faculty are cordially in-
vited.
-Rod Grambeau
got it, no question about that,"
said the Giant first-sacker.
Shantz, himself, said he wasn't
concentrating on striking anyone
out. "I was merely trying to get
them to hit the first pitch," said
the little southpaw.
IM SCORES
Fletcher 11, Social Research 0
Bartenders 4, Hardrocks 3
Jokers 23, Delta Sigma Phi 6
Zeta Psi 3, Van Tyne 2
Scott 20, Chemistry "B" 12
Rod's Boys 25, Air Force 7
MICHIGAN'S
ULTRA MODERN
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AIR CONDITIONED
6 Barbers
Special Attention Given
Ladies' & Children's Hair Cutting
U of M BARBERS
715 N. University
T.V. For Your Enjoyment
Smash Comedy!
Presented by
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by Mary Chose
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$1.20, 90c, 60c
BOX OFFICE
OPEN DAILY
10 A.M. to 5 P.M.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
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Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
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LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Gray Kitten in vicinity of East
William and Thompson. Call No. on
his tag or bring to 512 E. William,
Back apt.
FOR SALE
ART SALE private collection, oils, water
colors, portfolios, books. 1918 Day,
Phone 2-1710.
ANTIQUE CHAIRS - 1 Hitchcock, 1
Duncan Fyfe, 1 arm Windsor, 1 comb
back Windsor. 1 tilt top table. Mis-
cellaneous objects: candle sticks,
lamps, dishes, fixtures. 1918 Day Ph.
2-1710.
28" BOY'S Roadster bike and White
manual sewing machine. Ph. 3-1367
after 8:30 p.m.
SPANISH Language Course. Columbia
records. 40 lessons; sacrifice. Phone
24058.
FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE APT. near Campus to
sublet July 15 to Sept. 15. Real bar-
gain for right tenant. 3-1479 evenings.
AVAILABLE -- A new 3-room de-
luxe apartment which accommodates
four. Completely furnished, electric
stove and refrigerator. Private en-
trance. $95 per month. Willvrent for
summer. Need a car. Call 2-9020.
FRATERNITY or sorority house for
rent, approved for twenty-five. Close
to campus. Write Box 17.
ATTRACTIVE roomy apartment for 3
or 4 boys. Near campus. Call 3-1034
evenings, 5201 days.
ROOMS FOR RENT
4 STUDENTS--large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
room available for music students.)
$125 a month. Also single room. 320 E.
Washington after 4 P.M.

'REEK
111DS AZA
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
tions at The Campus Tourist homes
now. 518 E. William. Phone 3-8454.
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED to Boston, Mass. or
Portland, Maine July 11. Can help
with driving. University extension
526, 8-5 weekdays, 2-8330 after 5:30
p.m.
CALIFORNIA BOUND. Need riders to
share driving and expenses. Leave
July 15th. Phone 38119.
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.

TYPING - Reasonable rates. Accurate, 1 FRATERNITY HOUSE Meal Job immed-
Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 S. Main. iately available. Phone 8389.

BUSINESS SERVICES
MEWS' USED BIKES and used radios.
Ann Arbor Radio & T.V. 1215 So.
Univ., Ph. 7942. 1', blocks east of
East Engineering.
RADIOSERVICE
Auto -- Home -- Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T V
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
11' blocks east of East Engin.
ALTERATIONS -- Women's garments.
Prompt service. Catherine St. near
State. Ph. 2-2678.
HELP WANTED
MAKE $20.00 DAILY -- Sell Luminous
Name Plates. Write Reeves Co., Attle-
boro, Mass., Free Sample and details.

l

NATIONAL LEAGUE

w
Brooklyn ...........51
New York ..........47
St. Louis..........46
Chicago...........42
Philadelphia ........35
Cincinnati ........33
Boston. .........30
Pittsburgh .........21

L
21
26
34
34
40
44
46
59

Pet.
.708
.644
.575
.545
.467
.429
.395
.263

I

TV

TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Pittsburgh (N)
Boston at Cincinnati (N)
Brooklyn at Chicago (N)
Philadelphia at St. Louis (N)
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
New York ..........45 29 .608
Chicago ,............44 34 .564
Cleveland ..........42 33 .560
washington ........39 34 .534
Boston............39 36 .520
Philadelphia ........31 37 .456
St. Louis ...........32 45 .416
Detroit .............25 49 .338
TODAY'S GAMES

GB
4a/
9
11%
17%
2012~
23
34
GB
3
2 ]/
5Y2
62
11
141/
20

al1

'1

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DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

1

Chicago at Washington (2) (Twi-
night)
Cleveland at Philadelphia (N)
St. Louis at New York (N)
Detroit at Boston (N)
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ONLY
CHINESE
RESTAURANT
AMERICAN DISHES
ALSO SERVED
1 A.M.-9 P.M.
Closed Tuesdays
LANTERN GARDENS
613 E. Liberty

q

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p
Cie~aSL "ui/
Presents
ROBERT MONTGOMERY
PINK HORSE
A story of the Mexican border - vengeance and
desperate manhunt behind the mask of gay fiesta.
"A Fascinating Film!". .. N. Y. TIMES
with
WANDA THOMAS
HENDRIX GOMEZ
Also
CHARLIE CH APLIN
n "T- I IAAAAI'DAKlT"

"On The Loose"

with

M

JOAN EVANS
MELVIN DOUGLAS

All Performances at 8 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

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