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July 06, 1952 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-07-06

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6

SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1952

TH E MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

Ilutchinson New Tiger Leader

c

r~*

* * *

Relief Pitcher To Succeed
Red Rolfe; Bartell Fired

Ron Gora, 'M' Natator,
Makes Olympic Squad

pETROIT-P)-The last place
Detroit Tigers yesterday fired
Manager Red Rolfe and in a dra-
mtic, surprise move boosted re-
lief pitcher Fred Hutchinson, fi-
ery 32-year-old righthander, into
the managerial post.
President Walter O. (Spike)
Briggs, Jr., announced the dismis-
sal of Rolfe and Third-Base Coach
Dick Bartell at the conclusion of a
board of directors' meeting that
preceded last night's game with
St. Louis.
* * *
BUT THE appointment of Hut-
chinson, only Tiger hurler with a
winning percentage, came as a
,olt.
Hutchinson hadn'tr figured
prominently in the pre-meeting
speculation. First Base Coach
Ted Lyons, former Chicago
White Sox pitcher and manager,
had been the original choice of
Briggs but Lyons turned down the
job.
Hutchinson was appointed to fill
out the season but Briggs declined
to comment on whether he will be
retained next season.
* * *
BRIGGS HOPES Hutch, recog-
nized as a scrappy competitor, can
fire up the dispirited Tigers and
lift them out of the cellar-a spot
where the Tigers never before fin-
ished.

Hutch, curly-haired .favorite
of Tiger fans and the American
League's player representative
to baseball Commissioner Ford
Frick's office, was in his 10th
season with the Tigers.
His appointment brought jubi-
lation in the Tiger clubhouse where
the team was dressing for last
night's game. But there was no
outward show of bitterness against
Rolfe.
Vic Wertz, home-run clouting
rightfielder, told reporters: "The
players are all for the guy (Hut-
chinson). They couldn't have pick-
ed a better man. We'll play for
that guy."
WHAT changes does Hutchin-
son plan?
"Maybe one outfield spot. I'm1
going to play who I think will
win. I don't think we're a last
place ball club. Red (Rolfe) said
so and the players say so."
Will he continue to pitch?
"Sure." "What about putting
yourself on the starting pitcher
list?" A reporter wanted to know.
"That all depends. I think we've
got a good pitching staff; good
starters and good reliefers.
"I'm going to play a percentage
game, but I don't mean I won't
gamble now and then, if I think
it's worth the chance."

Il

FRED HUTCHINSON
... at the Tiger helm
Dr.- Middlecoff
Paces Motor
City Tourney,
DETROIT-(11)-Dr. Cary Mid-
dlecoff fired three straight bir-
dies on the back nine yesterday
to grab a one stroke lead over Ted
Kroll at the three-quarter mark
of the $15,000 Motor City Open
Golf Tournament.
Middlecoff used only 13 putts
on the second nine for a 31 after
an even par 36 over the par 72
Red Run Golf Club course. This
gave him a 13 under par 54-hole
total of 69-67-67-203.
KROLL, leader after the first
round and tied for top after the
second, slipped to a 39 on the back
nine after a 33 going out for a
71. His 54 hole total is 65-68-71-
204.
Lloyd Mangrum, the defend-
ing champion, remained within
striking distance by firing a 37-
33-70 and a three-round total
of 205.
Just one more stroke back was
Dick Mayer, 27-year-old St. Pet-
ersburg, Fla., pro with 68-65-73-
206. He had shared the lead with
Kroll at the halfway mark.
This big four stood out above
the rest of the 80-man field go-
ing into the final 18-hole round
today.

By The Associated Press.
NEW YORK-Matt Mann, Uni-
versity of Michigan swimming
mentor and coach of the Ameri-
can Olympic natators, will defin-
itely have one Wolverine on his
squad in the person of Ron Gora.
Two others, Burwell "Bumpy"
Jones and Jim McKevitt, swim in
the finals of the 200-meter free
style this afternoon in a field call-
ed by Mann "the finest bunch ever
put together."
GORA, swift freshman who was
declared scholastically ineligible'
in the spring semester, finished
third behind Michigan State's'
and Ohio State's Dick Cleveland
H ~ajor League
Standings
(Not including last night's games)
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
New York............44 28 .611 -
Chicago .............43 33 .566 3
Cleveland...........41 32 .562 3/2
Boston.............39 34 .534 51/
Washington ..........37 34 .521 6/
Philadelphia........30 36 .455 11
St. Louis...........32 43 .427 13%,
Detroit ..............23 49 .319 21
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 3 Philadelphia 1
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Cleveland.
New York at Philadelphia (2)
St. Louis at Detroit
Boston at Washington.

in the 100 meter event Friday to
earn a berth on the Olympic team.
Scholes, in winning the race,
tied the Olympic record of :57.3
seconds.
Jones set the pace for the seven
qualifiers in the 200-meter free
style with a 2:10.9 job.
IN ANOTHER series of glitter-
ing performances yesterday Amer-
ica's male swimmers bettered three
Olympic records in as many events
capped by young Yoshi Oyakawa's
sparkling victory in the finals of
the 100-meter backstroke.
The backstroke was the only
final run off in the second day
of the Olympic tryouts in the
Flushing Meadows pool and it
followed sterling performances
by Ford Konno in the 1500-meter
free style and Jerry Holan in
the 200-meter breaststroke. All
three are from Ohio State and
Oyakawa and Konno hail from
Hawaii.
Oyakawa, the NCAA 200-yard
champion, was clocked in 1:05.7,
two-tenths of a second faster than
Adolph Kiefer's 1936 Olympic rec-
ord and only three-tenths of a
second slower than the American
long course standard set by Kiefer
12 years ago.

MICHIGAN DAILY
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LOST-Gray Kitten in vicinity of East
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FOR SALE
ART SALE private collection, oils, water
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Phone 2-1710.
ANTIQUE CHAIRS -- 1 Hitchcock, 1
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after 8:30 p.m.
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records. 40 lessons, sacrifice. 'Phone
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ATTRACTIVE APT. near Campus to
sublet July 15 to Sept. 15. Real bar-
gain for right tenant. 3-1479 evenings.

DHElI I
FOR RENT
AVAILABLE - A new 3-room de-
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four. Completely furnished, electric
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FRATERNITY 'or sorority house for
rent, approved for twenty-five. Close
to campus. Write Box 17.
ROOMS FOR RENT
4 STUDENTS-large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
room available for music students.)
$125 a month. Also single room. 320 E.
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ATTRACTIVE roomy apartment for 3
or 4 boys. Near campus. Call 3-1034
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OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
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Time magazine at student rates-6c.
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RIDE WANTED to Boston, Mass. or
Portland, Maine July 11. Can help
with driving. University extension
526, 8-5 weekdays, 2-8330 after 5:30
p.m.
CALIFORNIA BOUND. Need riders to
share driving and expenses. Leave
July 15th. Phone 38119.
M 1

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WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
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TYPING - Reasonable rates. Accurate,
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Bring Quick Results

TODAY THRU TUES.

L!

11

I

l

I

COOL
Today Today
More than a year ago, Twentieth Century-Fox sent
Maureen O'Hara, Peter Lawford, Finlay Currie, Richard
Boone and director Lewis Milestone, together with Tech-
nicolor cameras and a complete production unit, 9200
miles to film the adventure romance "Kangaroo!" in the
rugged Flinders ranges in the primitive heart of Australial
Here was a story so integrally blended with its locale that
only in the wild rawbush country of the Australian Desert
could it be vitally realized on the screen.
Amazing, savage wonders of the last-discovered contin-
ent were captured by the Technicolor cameras: the
world's strangest beasts-giant lizards, wombats, dingos,
bull-ants, emus-extinct everywhere else for millions of
years. And against this strange, prehistoric wonderland
is played an unusual romance and adventure story of the
present century--of a wild Irish beauty and a misguided,
marauding bushranger-of gamblers and cattle-thieves,
stockmn and hard-riding troopers.
The cameras recorded the sight and sound of aborigines
in the exciting dance of the Coroboree-the sinister chant
of spear-throwing Abos. They caught the thunder of
thirst-crazed herds, the scream of the boomerang-and
a bull-whip fight never before seen on the screen.
This is "Kangaroo.y
'The Australian StorYl
1

Also starring Wt
HUGHl ImIARLOWE - ELENESTANLEY
TOMMY MORTON
ADDED
NEWS & CARTOON

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* IT'S EASY TO DO
* IT'S MORE
CONVENIENT

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when you

I (It" an't-.rgie-un skirt. Wide' 1

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