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September 17, 1952 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-09-17

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

ROTC, NATIONAL GUARD:
'U' Students Meet Army Obligations

(Continued from Page 1)
to take a physical examination,'
they may have the physical here in
Michigan through the Ann Arbor'
board, but their classification will
be determined at home.
if da student receives a defer-
ment for continued college work
(2AS classification), he must
satisfy his draft board that he
is doing passing work to keep
his deferment.
At the beginning of each term'
the Registrar's office notifies each,
student's draft board of his at-
tendance at the University. This is
usually sufficient notification.
However some draft boards may
request the student to send in a
special letter from the Registrar's
office or his own school within
the University.
If such a letter is needed, the
draft board will notify the individ-
ual student.
At the end of each school year,
the student must send Form 109
to his local board. This form of-
} ficially notifies the board that
the student plans to take fur-
ther work at the University.
Form 109 may be picked up at
the Registrar's office or through
the office of the student's in-
dividual school, in a few cases.
The board can review a stu-
dent's classication at any time
and in light of their quotas and
available manpower, reverse a pre-
vious 2AS classification. It must be
also remembered that a deferment
is not an exemption. Students de-
ferred for college work must still
serve their required time 'in the
armed forces at a later date..
Most students who are deferred
until completion of college will be
drafted when they finish unless
they enlist. Only students who
graduate when they are over 35
can expect to avoid service.
} ONE OF the ways to eliminate
chances involved in seeking a de-

ferment is to enlist in an Organ-
ized Reserve Corps or the National
Guard.
A student studying at the Uni-
versity would have to join one
of the units here in Ann Arbor.
He would not be subject to the
draft, but he would have to go
whenever his unit was called,
which can be at any time.
National Guard and ORC units
train about four nights a month
and usually make a summer en-
campment. Members are paid for
each full day of active duty.
a * .*
THE ROTC provides another
way for college men to meet their
military obligations.
A man joining the ROTC can
receive a full four years of edu-
cation, a total of $650.00 in pay,
and enter the service at the end
of college with a full commission
and a tailor-made uniform to
go with it.
One big obstacle that must be
surmounted before entering the
ROTC is the physical exam which
is more rigorous than the regular
pre-induction exam.
After that, the ROTC student
is just like the rest of the students
on campus. He chooses his own
academic program, which natur-
ally must include ROTC studies,
and can participate in any regu-
lar campus activity.
To avoid the draft a student
must sign a contract agreeing to
pursue his course in ROTC through
college, and to accept a commis-
sion and serve for a minimum of
two years of active duty, if called
by the Secretary of the Army.
THE ROTC programs of the
Army, Navy and Air Force differ
slightly but in general are divided
into two periods.
The basic program lasts the
first two years during which the
student is not paid.
After two years the ROTC ca-.

det goes into the advanced pro-
gram where he specializes in one
field, receives 90 cents a day ra-
tion allotment and a tailor made
officer's uniform.
Between his junior and senior
years he must make a six weeks
encampment or cruise, for which
he is paid $112.
Upon graduation exceptional
students can receive regular
commissions. Other students are
commissioned in the reserves.
The Navy has a special pro-
gram called the Hollaway Plan in
addition to their regular "con-
tract" ROTC. Underrthis plan stu-
dents are contacted while still in
High School, where applicants are
screened by the Navy before they
enter college.
Students selected in this pro-
gram receive tuition, books, labor-
atory fees and a monthly allot-
ment for expenses from the Navy.
Upon graduation they are com-
missioned in the regular Navy and
must serve two years on active
duty.
Students May
Rent Art Prints
Framed reproductions of art
masterpieces from all periods are
available to students at rental fees
of 50 cents per print per semester
from the Student Loan Print Col.
Ilection.
Close to 100 prints are placed
on exhibit in the Rackham Build-
ing during orientation week. Stu-
dents may list their preferences
the second week of school with dis-
tribution on a first come first
served basis.
Students may rent only one
print at first, but they will be al-
lowed a second choice from prints
which remain afters the signing
up period is over.

'U' Provides
Health Care
For Students
Looking after the health of the
thousands of Michigan students
is the job of the University's
Health Service-one of the first
and best student health centers in
the United States.
BEFORE A STUDENT can reg-
ister for the first time at the Uni-
versity, he must receive a tho-
rough physical examination, us-
ually lasting about two hours. X-
rays are also taken to check for
tuberculosis.
Each student is assigned to a
physician medical adviser whom
he may feel free to call on for ad-
vice or treatment of any ailment.
* * *
IF THE SERVICES of a spe-
cialist are required, the student
will be referred to one of the
Health Service's specially equipped
departments.
Student patients are never used
as clinical subjects for medical
student instruction or experimen-
tation.
A 60-BED INFIRMARY is lo-
cated on the third floor of the
Health Service.
Cases that cannot be handled
by the Health Service are gen-
erally referred to the 1,029-bed
University Hospital. In cases of
serious illness, parents are no-
tified by special delivery letters.
Services offered to students
without charge include 15 days of
general hospitalization during
each semester at a daily expense
allowance of more than $10.00,
surgeon fees and operating ex-
penses for acute surgical condi-
tions, simple drugs and dressings,
and medical attention at the var-
ious University summer camps.

* * *

DRAMA QUARTETTE TO APPEAR:
Lecture Series Includes 14 Celebrities

Highlighted by two unusual dra-
matic numbers, the University Or-
atorical Association L e c t u r e
Course will feature 14 celebrities
in seven outstanding presenta-
tions during the 1952-53 seasons.
Programs by the Drama Quar-
tette, starring Charlqs Boyer, Sir
Cedric Hardwicke, Agnes Moore-
head and CharlesfLaughton; Em-
lyn Williams in his "Charles Dick-
ens" impersonation; a panel dis-
cussion and several lectures are
included in the series.
S * * *
"WASHINGTON - Merry - Go -
Round," the latest behind the
scenes information from Washing-
ton, will be presented W Drew
Pearson, as the opening lecture,
Oct. 15.
Known for crusades against
political, social, military and
legislative privilege and his
"predictions of things to come,"
Pearson began his journalistic
career in 1926 when he served
as foreign editor of the United
States Daily and the following
year covered the Geneva Naval
Conference.
In 1932 Pearson, with Col. Ro-
bert S. Allen inaugurated the
."Washington Merry-Go-Round"
column, which has become a syn-
dicated column in over 650 news-
papers throughout the world.
THE DRAMA Quartette's pre-
sentations of Shaw's witty "Don
Juan in Hell," scheduled for Nov.
5 won unanimous critical acclaim
on a nation-wide tour, and lavish
praise from New York and Lon-
don critics.
The four stage and screen stars
composing the quartette enact the
Irish dramatist's philosophical
charade against simple, black'
backdrops, wearing evening dress
instead of the costumes originally
prescribed. They give the illusion
of reading the prose directly from

ter H. Judd of Minnesota on Jan.
14.
Sen. Douglas, former faculty
member of the University of
Chicago, and author of numer-
ous economics books, was elect-
ed to the Senate in 1948. Rep.
Judd, now serving his fifth con-
secutive term in Congress is an
authority on foreign affairs and
lived for ten years in China as
a medical missionary.
As the fifth in the Lecture
Course on Feb. 16, Emlyn Wil-
liams, celebrated English actor
and playwright, will read scenes
from the works of Charles Dickens
as Dickens himself read them
himself in this country a century
ago.
JAMES B. RESTON, who has
been reporting major news events
for the London Bureau of the New
York Times since 1939, will be
heard in "Reston Views the News"
on March 9.
Awarded the 1944 Pulitzer
Prize for his news dispatches
and interpretative articles on
the Dumbarton Oaks Security
Conference, Reston writes ana-
lytical interpretations of ma-
jor political events which are
featured in leading newspapers
throughout the country.
A master of humorous verse
stylings, Ogden Nash will appear
as the final presentation of the
series, reading a program of his
own poems with comments on the
turn of events which caused their
creation.
Season tickets for the course,
with special savings for students,
may be secured at the Hill Audi-
torium box office which will open
Sept. 15 for counter sale. Single
admissions for all performances
will not be placed on sale until
Oct. 14.

THE DRAMA QUARTETTE-"DON JUAN IN HELL"

the printed text through the de-
vice of music stands placed before
them.
* * *
A PANEL discussion on "World
Affairs Today" will be presented'
Nov. 20 by four men from four
countries: Camille Chautemps of
France, Cuneyo Dosdogru of Tur-
key, Melchoir Aquino of the Phil-
ippines and John C. Metcalfe of
the United States.
Chautemps has held high po-
sitions in many French cabinets
from 1924 to 1940 and was four
times Premier of France. Dos-

dogru, founder of the Ankara
News Agency has served in the
ECA Information Office and
Ankara and has written many
articles on the Marshall plan
and its importance to Turkey.
Philippine Delegate to the Uni-
ted Nations, Aquino has served on
the Far Eastern Commission. Mo-
derator for the panel, Metcalfe is
a noted diplomatic correspondent.
* * *
"OUR FOREIGN Policy, Right
or Wrong?" will be the topic of a
discussion by Sen. Paul H. Douglas
of Illinois and Congressman Wal-

I

U

An exceptional

plat.

form series consistent
with the high educa.
tional and entertain.
mnent standards of the
University of Michi-
gan.
OGDEN
NASH
Celebrated Writer
of Light Verse

MARCH 19 -
"AN EVENING WITH OGDEN NASH"
SPECIAL RATE
TO STUDENTS-
$2e50
Complete Course, Second Balcony, Unreserved

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University of Michigan Oratorical Association
1952-53 LECTURE COURSE
presents a program of
tzi4tikhuiale4 Celebitie4
HILL AUDITORIUM e ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

Congressman from Minnesota

x1

Drama

- Literature

- Entertainment

National and World Affairs
Seven Stellar Attractions
SEASON TICKET PRICES: Main Floor, $7.50; First Balcony $6.50

:4 strictly non-profit series, the Lecture
Course was established by the Board of
Regents to provide the highest cultural
entertainment for the University and
the community.
THE HONORABLE
WALTER H.-JUDD

THE HONORABLE
PAUL H. DOUGLAS
U. S. Senator from Illinois
JAN. 14 -- DISCUSSION:
"OUR FOREIGN POLICY, RIGHT
OR WRONG?"

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EMLYN.

FEB. 16

WILLIAMS
Eminent English
Actor and
Author
As
CHARLES
DICKENS

CHAUTEMPS

AQUINO

DOSDOGRU

DREW PEARSON
Famous Washington Columnist
OCT. 15 -
"WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND"

JAMES P. RESTON
Distinguished Journalist
MARCH 9 -
"RESTON VIEWS THE NEWS"

M ETCALFE

NOV. 20

WORLD AFFAIRS

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