100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 09, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-08-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SATURDAY, AUGUST 9, 1952'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Last Inning Four Run Chicago Rally Nips

m

PAGE THREE
iegrs

<">

Journalist Asks Kentucky
To Quit Southeastern Loop

Major League
Standings

Braves Shut Out New York;
Brooklyn Halts Philadelphia

4

LEXINGTON, Ky. (P)-A Lex-
ington sports writer suggested Fri-
day that "perhaps the best thing
that could happen would be for
the University of Kentucky to say
'Nunts to you,' pull out of the
f Southeastern Conference and let
go with a blast directed at the SEC
while a few sparks fly off in other
f directions."
LARRY SHROPSHIRE, sports
reditor of the Lexington Leader de-
clared in his daily column that
while days and weeks pass with
no word from leaders of the South-
eastern Conference on what they
intend to say or do as a result of
their inquiry into the school's ath-
letic practices, "the local school
suffers more as each day drops off
the calendar."
The conference conducted a.
probe into the school's athletic
: set-up, at the request of the uni-
versity, after several Kentucky
basketball players became in-
volved in the nation-wide bas-
ketball fix scandal.
A meeting was held recently in
Birmingham at which representa-
tives of the University appeared

before the SEC executive commit-
. tee. An announcement concerning
r the results of the investigation
was expected following this meet-
ing, but this was delayed.
t
SHROPSHIRE questioned the
right of "conference executives to
infer, by a prolonged 'jury ses-
sion' and delayed 'verdict,' that
Kentucky has been decreed guilty
of some evil operations and must
face penalty or punishment."
* Shropshire stated that SEC
T schools for years have been do-
ing what Kentucky is presumed
to have done "after Kentucky
finally got the urge to quit being
E a door-mat and to compete on
equal terms with conference ri-
vals. That, of course, boils down
to going out and hunting for
good athletes and trying by one
means or another to get them
enrolled and keep them eligible
and happy.'
Yet, Shropshire said, Kentucky
has been on trial, and, "in effect
already convicted because it has,
- in a manner of speaking, 'been
caught.'"

NATI
Brooklyn
New Work
St. Louis
Philadelphi
Chicago
Boston
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh

ONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.
67 32 .677
62 38 .620
62 44 .585
ia 56 47 .544
52 51 .505
42 60 .412
43 63 .406
30 79 .275

GB
5r/
81/
13
17
26%/
27%/
42
GB
35
5
611
9
9'
18
261/

AMERICAN
W
New York 64
Cleveland 60
Boston 56
Washington 56
Philadelphia 52
Chicago 54
St. Louis 46
Detroit 36

LEAGUE
L Pet.
45 .587
47 .561
47 .544
50 .528
49 .515
53 .505
63 .422
70 .340

CLASSIFIEDSI
ROOMS FOR RENT
ICHIGAN DAILY OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva.-
Phone 23-24-1 tions at The Campus Tourist Homes1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M. now. 518 E. William. Phone 3-8454.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING CAMBRIDGE 1430- double, 1 single
RATES for men.
L DAYS ROOMS FOR FALL - 906 Greenwood
LINES DAY 3 DAYS 6A apartment, double & singles. Refrig-t
2 .60 1.34 .96 erator privileges, hollywood beds, De-I
4 .70 1.8 .9 troit landord. Cal Jack Bergstrom
" 4 .90 2.24 3.2 triladodCalJcBegrmI.9 2-7108 or write Stu Hertzberg, 1-7617I
Figure 5 overage words to a line. Ohio Detroit, Mich.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M.,Sturdays, ATTRACTIVE, comfortable rooms for
11:30 A.M., for Sunay issuer grad. students or prof. men. 1402 Hill.
1S sPh. 2-3781.
FOR SALE BUSINESS SERVICES
ANTIQUE CHAI:RS - 1 Hitchcock, 1 TYPING - Reasonable rates. Accurate.
Duncan Pyfe. 1 arm Windsor, I comb Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 8. Main,
back Windsor. 1 tut top table Mis-
cellaneous objects: candle sticks, WASHING, finished work, and hand
lamps, dishes, fixtures. 1918 Day Ph. ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.t
2-1710. Ruff dry and wet washing. Also tron-S
ing separately. Free pick-up and de.
ART BALI private collection, Oils, water livery. Phone 2-9020.
colors prtfolios, books 1918 Day.I
Phone 2-4710. RADIO SERVICE
HOUEME TRAILER- wall with built in Auto - home - Portable
boo case. 30 ft. "cozy-coach". has Phono & T.VI
natural wood finish throughout, elec- Past & Reasonable Service S
trio refrigerator, electric hot water ANN ARBOR RADIO & T
heater. Very liberal terms. Can be "Student Service"
"%tudentS eice" @
seen at 410 E. Jeff. 1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
FOR SALE-Silver Tint Mouton Coat, 13 blocks east of East ngin.
% length. Almost new. 1028 Stock- ALTERATIONS on ladies garments re-
well, serve for future us. A. Graves.
P 2-2678..
8TRADIVARIOUS VIOLIN, case, in fine Phone 26
condition, Call 2-1661, 7 to 10 a.m. H ELP WANTED
MEN'S ENGLISH BIKE-Headlight, car-
rier, good condition. Ph. 2-8278. INTERVIEWERS for part time opinion
surveys. College background preferred,
LINGUAPHONE SPANISH COURSE - not essential. Experience not neces-
Records and text. $35. Phone 2-8871.. ary. Answer fully. Box 18.
OLDS CONVERTIBLE 1937-R & H, new H EL P
top, excellent condition. Call 3-826H.
wanted for Fall semester. Phone 6007.S
FOR RENT
AVAILABLE - A new 3-room de- TRANSPORTATION u
luxe apartment which accommodates RIDERS WANTED to Kallispell, Mont.
four. Completely furnished, electric e abou ug. 11.K Pn 7138.
stove and refrigerator. Private en-_'_
trance. $95 per month. Will rent for 2 or 3 RIDERS WANTED-Driving toS
summer. Need a ar. Call 2-9020. Kansas City, Missouri. August 1 or 2.
References: exchange phone 2-3006 be-
NEAR CAMPUS - Unfurnished 4 room tween 6 and 7 p.m.f
op't-tile bath, no heat nor utilities.__________________
Has stove and refrigerator. No pets. DRIVING to salem, Oregon. Leave Aug.
School-age child preferred. $95. Ph. 15. Need riders to share gas and ex-
6465 penses. Bob Preston, 3-8774.S
MALE STUDENT to share basement .'
ap't; good location. Private room. $30 ROOM AND BOARD 0
per mo. Ph. 5830. a
BOARD AND ROOM at 1026 Oakland.
ATTRACTIVE APT. near Campus to $280.00 a semester. Make reservations
sublet July 15 to Sept. 15. Real bar- before Wed., Aug. 13. Phone 2-8269.C
gain for right tenant. 3-1479 evenings,.
ROOMS FOR RENT PERSONAL
4 STUDENTS-large, spacious 2 bedroom LAST CALL-
furnished ap't. twin beds, (practice for all summer school students to
room available for music students.) obtain magazines at special low rate.
? $125 a month. Also single room 320 B. Phone 6007 except Sundays-Student
Washington after 4 P.M. Periodical Agency. t
r - a
TRAVELER'Ss
;x CHECKS
i SAFE
i'' CONVENIENT
and can be
Y'CASHED ANYWHERE
QUICKLY

Conservation
Board Allows
Deer Hunting
GRAYLING-QP)-Three days of
rifle hunting for deer of either sex
throughout the northern Lower
Peninsula this fall were approved
yesterday by the State Conserva-
tion Commission.
This method of reducing the
over-populated herd was approved
on a five to one vote over the more
cautious recommendation of the
Conservation Department Game
Division for a special season the
first seven days in December in
limited Northern Lower Peninsula
areas.
* * *
COMMISSIONER Donald B.
McLouth of Detroit led the move
to open the last three days of the
regular season to shooting of
bucks, does and fawns north of
highway M-20 and south of the
Straits of Mackinac.
Commissioner Richard H.
Fletcher of Bay City voted
against the motion, holding with
the game division that it was
too drastic to be swallowed by
the public.
Game men admitted, however,
that even shooting deer of either
sex in the region in the whole 16-
day season would not seriously de-
plete the deer.
* " *
THUS DEER hunting will be
permitted as usual throughout the
state, starting Nov. 15 and ending
Nov. 30. In the Upper Peninsula
and Southern Lower Peninsula,
bucks with three-inch antlers on-
ly may be shot throughout the
period and only shotguns may be
used in the Southern Lower. Pen-
insula.
In the Northern Lower Penin-
sula, bucks only may be shot
Nov. 15 through Nov. 27 but any
deer will be legal game Nov. 28,
29, and 30.
The commission retained on
special season to follow the regu-
lar season by authorizing contin-
uance of regulations permitting
shooting of any deer under spe-
cial permit in Allegan County Dec.
1 through 7. This post season
shooting has been permitted for
many years and has been success-
ful in holding deer within bounds.
THE BOW and arrow deer sea-
son was left unchanged, running
from Oct. 1 through Nov. 5. Deer
of either sex may be killed by
archers in all of the Lower Pen-
insula except Menominee and
Chippewa where they may only
take bucks.
The commission set the wat-
er-fowl season to open Oct. 1,
the earliest in years and ap-
proved a 55-day season, 10 days
longer than last year. Liberaliz-
ed federal regulations to permit
this decision to become final
were expected momentarily from
Washington.
The woodcock season, subject
also to federal rgeulations, was set
o coincile exactly with previously
et upland bird hunting seasons.
The commission approved pay-
ing $40,940 for 984 acres of land
and one water frontage parcel
to add to existing game areas
and one state forest.

CHICAGO- (P)-The Chicago
White Sox last night exploded a
four run ninth inning rally with
six hits to defeat Detroit 4-3 in
the first game of a twilight-night
double header before an estimated
20,000.
Bill Hoeft held the White Sox to
four hits before retiring . in the
sixth because of a back injury.
Don Kolloway clouted his first
homer of the season in the sev-
enth to score Matt Batts ahead
of him.
* * *
THE TIGERS used three pitch-
ers in the ninth in an attempt to
stave off the Chicago rally.
With one out Sam Mele sing-
led and Tom Wright doubled,
Mele going to third. Sherm Lol-
lar singled past third to load the
bases. Hal Brown ran for Lol-
lar. Ed Stewart, batting for Wil-
lie Miranda, singled, scoring
Mele. Dick Littlefield replaced
Marlin Stuart for Detroit.
Krsnich batted for Billy Pierce
and fanned. Then Hector Rodri-
guez singled, scoring Wright and
Brown with the tying run. After
Stuart's hit, Virgil Trucks replaced
Littlefield and Fox singled scoring
Stewart with the winning tally.
* * *
BRAVES 2, GIANTS 0
BOSTON-(P)-After being fet-
ed by a delegation of his Pawtuck-
et, R. I., hometownsmen, right-
hander Max Surkont last night
limited the New York Giants to
four hits while hurling the Boston
Braves to a 2-0 shutout over the
National League Champions.
The Braves totaled eight hits off
Max Lanier and clinched matters
in the first inning on singles by
Sam Jethroe and Bob Thorpe, an
infield out and an error.
* * *
WHILE turning in his seventh
win against 10 losses, two of which
were to the Giants, Surkont struck

out three and gave up four bases
on balls without being in the
slightest danger of losing his shut-
out.
Surkont, showered with gifts
during the pre-game ceremonies
gave up the first New York hit
to Bobby Thomson in the second
inning. But that was rendered
harmless by Don Mueller's drib-
ble into a double play.
Former Brave Alvin Dark was
held hitless on four trips as he
broke his 22-game streak. Only
two Giants got as far as second
base during the 104 minutes of
action.
* * *
DODGERS 6, PHILLIES 3
PHILADELPHIA - (iP) - Andy
Pafko clouted a three-run 10th
inning homer last night to give
the Brooklyn Dodgers a 6 to 3 win
over the Philadelphia Phillies.
The win put the league-leading
Dodgers six and a half games in
front of the New York Giants who
lost last night to the Boston
Braves.
* * *
PAFKO WAS the Dodgers' big
gun, batting in five of their six
runs with his homer, a double and
long fly ball.
The loss- was a heartbreaker
for Curt Simmons, Philadelphia
left-hander, who was pounded
hard in the first two innings
and then settled down. At one
point in mid-game, he retired 10
men in order.
Preacher Roe, the third Brook-
lyn hurler who took over in the
eighth, received credit for the win.
* * *
THE BROOKLYN outburst in
the tenth started with a single by
leadoff man Peewee Reese. After
Jackie Robinson sacrificed, Roy
Campanella was purposely walked.
Then came Pafko's three-run hom-
er blasted into the leftfield stands.
* * *

Tam Golf
Meet Paced
ByFerrier
CHICAGO-(AP)--Big Jim Fer-
rier, the unorthodox swinger and
master putter, slammed into a
two-stroke lead over Lew Wor-
sham at the 36 hole mark of the
$90,000 "World Golf Champion-
ship" at Tam O'Shanter yesterday
with a blistering second round of
66 for a 134 total, 10 under par.
Ferrier, a 37-year-old Australian
who came to the U.S. in 1940 and
hit his biggest golfing jackpot by
winning the 1947 National PGA
Crown, needed only 27 putts in
carving a 31-35 against Tam's bat-
tered par of 36-36-72. He tacked
his second trip 66 to an opening
68.
* * *
WORSHAM HAD to scramble
for his front side 33 then blew in
the pressure-packed meet that
pays an unprecedented $25,000 to
the winner wit ha 7 on the par
5 475-yard 10th hole.
The 34-year-old Worsham
sent his second shot into a trap
at No. 10 then blasted out over
the green. is chip was short of
the carpet and he needed 5 to
get on and two putts to get
down.
He missed the green on the 13th
for a big 5 and didn't settle down
until the 15th when he reached
the 515-yard hole in two and two
putted for a birdie 4.
* * *
BILL CAMPBELL of Hunting-
ton, W. Va., the 29-year-old ex-
state legislator, continued to top
the men's amateurs with a dupli-
cating 68 for 136. Defending
Champion Frank Stran an kept
on the Southerner's hee s with a
.32-36-68 for a 138 tally.
Heading the women's amateur
group was Joyce Ziske, the Water-
ford, 'is., teenager, with an 82-
77-159.1

Coach Biggie Munn yesterday
invited seventy players to the first
grid practice of the Michigan State
Spartans on September 3.
Pictures -of the gridders are
scheduled to be taken on the day
before the official practice starts.
Detroit Craft
Hay Wint 45th
Gold Cup Race
SEATTLE-(P)--Reading strict-
ly from the face of the clock, to-
day's 45th running of the Gold Cup
speedboat classic looks like a two-
boat battle matching a blimpy
monster from Detroit and the sau-
cy, saucerish pride of Seattle, the
Slo-Mo-Shun V.
When the cannon roars for the
start of the first heat at 1 p.m.,
(PDT), 4 p.m., (EDT) the mam-
moth crowd will center its atten-
tion on the clash for position be-
tween Detroit's Miss Pepsi and
the romping Slo-Mo.
* * * .
FOUR OTHER boats will be in
there knocking but they escaped
the glare of the spotlight by quali-
fying at unimpressive speeds. The
Slo-MoMShun IV, Seattle sister
of the cup-defending V, averaged
93.023 in her three lap, nine-mile
qualifying run.
Such Crust got in with a tim-
ing of 91.135, Miss Great Lakes
II, was timed in 88.888.
The Hurricane IV, a Los Angeles
bzidder, was clocked in 89.776 as
the whole field beat the 75 m.p.h.
minimum with ease.
* * *
MISS PEPSI'S two howling en-
gines yanked her five tons over the
Lake Washington course at an av-
erage of 103.448, breaking the qual-
ifying record for the second suc-
cessive year. Last year she set the
mark at 100.5586, but, this was
cracked when the Slo-Mo V qual-
ified Monday at 102.564.
A year ago Miss Pepsi chased
the V to a lap record of 108.66,
but then she conked out and the
Slo-Mo went on to win with ease.
This year the same drivers will
be feuding again, Chuck Thomp-
son in the Pepsi and reckless Lou
Fageol in the V.
Not a one of the other boats can
be counted out. Both the Hurri-
cane and the Such Crust turned
trial laps at better than 100. The
Slo-Mo IV holds the world speed
record of 178.497 miles per hour,
won the cup in 1950 and placed
third last year.
MISS GREAT LAKES was rush-
ed into her qualifying run without
much warmup and gave little in-
dication of what she might be abl&,
to do.
It takes three heat of 30 miles
each to decide the race and these
will be run two hours apart. The
second is scheduled to start at 3
p.m. and the third at 5 p.m. (PDT).

Michigan State Set To Open
Grid Drills September 3rd

COACH MUNN has twenty-six
lettermen back from last year's
undefeated, untied team which
ranked second in the, nation in
the football polls at the end of
the season.
Tennessee was given the top
spot, with the University of
Maryland taking third place.
Tennessee met Maryland in the
Sugar Bowl at New Orleans on
January 1, 1952 and the Vols
were soundly beaten 28-13.
Maryland thus can lay strong
claim to the number one spot.
Midwest fans however consider
that the Michigan State squad
was just about the best in the
land despite the outcome of the
polly or bowl games.
The team includes nineteen sen-
iors, the' same number of juniors,
twenty-eight sophomores and four
freshmen.
* * *
THE FRESHMEN are eligible
because they enrolled last year.
No first-year men enrolling this
year will be eligible under West-
ern Conference rules.
The Spartans must find a re-
placement for Al Dorow, their
graduated quarterback. At the
present there is a two man bat-
te for the vacant position with
Tom Yewcic, a junior from Con-
emaugh, Pennsylvania and Wil-
lie Thrower, a senior from New
Kensington, Pennsylvania being
the participants. Thrower, as
his name would indicate, is an
excellent passer.
Michigan State is loaded with
powerful fullbacks. The Green
and White have Dick Panin of De-
troit, Wayne Benson of Harvey,
Illinois, Evan Slonac from St.
Michael, Pennsylvania and Ed
Timmeiman from Grand Rapids.
*Panin. broke last year's Notre
Dame game wide open when on
the first play from scrimmage he
carried the ball from the. Michigan
State twelve yard line all the way
to a touchdown.
* * *
THE SPARTANS will miss their
All-American end Bob Carey, but
there is plenty of strength in their
end corps for 1952. Doug Bobo,
Paul Dekker, Ed Luke, Don Do-
honey and Ellis Duckett should
stand the Spartans in good stead
during the coming season. Duckett
was converted to the }flank posi-
tion from halfback because the
Michigan State coaches felt that
there was an over-surplus of tal-
ent in the backfield 'and not
enough at the ends.
The Spartans' All-America
candidate at guard, Frank Kush
of Windber, Pennsylvania is re*
covering from the near-tragic
accident which befell him over
the summer.
The schedule calls for the usual
two-a-day drills with the emphs-
sis on getting in top condition for
the rigorous seasan to come. The
Spartans open against Michigan
on September 27 at Ann Arbor.

MOSTLY COAST TEAMS:
BigTen To Play Intersectional Foes-

Big Ten, football squads will
take part in several of this sea-
son's major intersectional clashes:
All of these games, with the ex-
ception of the Michigan-Cornell
battle will feature mid-Western
teams against squads from the Pa-
cific Coast Conference.
* * *
WISCONSIN will square off
against the powerful Bruins of
U.C.L.A. in what should be a
mighty tussle. The Illini will
tangle with the Washington Hus-
kies for the third straight year.
Washington has lost both times by
seven points, but in both instances
Illinois had to come from behind
in the last quarter to achieve vic-
tory.
Michigan will play the de-
fending Coast Conference cham-
pion Stanford Indians on the
second Saturday of the season.
Last year Stanford ended a Mi-
chigan domination of Pacific
Coast teams which began back
on New Year's Day of 1902. On
that date, Fielding H. Yost's
first "Point-a-Minute" t e a m
licked the' Stanford squad by
a 49-0 score in what was the
fore-runner of the modern Rose
Bowl Game.
The Wolverines continued to
beat teams from the far-West. In
1940 they walloped California 41-
0, in 1947 they beat Stanford 49-
13 during the regular season and
inflicted the now famous 49-0
slaughter on Southern California
in. the Rose Bowl. In 1948 Chuck
Ortmann outpassed Norm Van-
Broklin and the Maize and Blue
dumped Oregon here at Ann Ar-
bor 14-0. In 1949 Stanford was
again beaten, 27-7 out on the

coast. In the Rose Bowl game on
January 1, 1951 the Wolverines
succeeded in coming from behind
with two last-quarter touchdowns,
to beat a favored Galifornia squad
14-6.
STANFORD'S 23-13 victory here
in the stadium last year sent the
Indians on their way to the
championship of the coast league.
Minnesota will get a look at
two coast squads in their first
two games this season. The Go-
phers open with Washington
and follow that up with Califor-
nia.
Coach Wes Fesler's team played
a great game against the Huskies
last year, losingonly by a touch-
down scored late in the fourth
period. Against Lynn Waldorf's
California Bears however, the Go-
phers were helpless. The boys from
Berkely buried Minnesota under a
55-14 score. The fifty-five points
represents the largest total ever
amassed against a Minnesota
team. Michigan came close at mid-
season with a 54-27 victory over
the Gophers.
OHIO STATE will try its luck
against Washington State in Co-
lumbus. The Cougars said good-
bye to Forrest Evashevski over the
winter. They may have 'said fare-,
well to succssful football too, for
Evashevski had lifted the team
from a doormat to a squad strong
enough to play Pappy Waldorf's
mighty Beads to a 42-35 game last
fall.
In non-conference action clos-
er to home, Notre Dame will ap-
pear on the schedules of Iowa,
Purdue and Michigan State.
The Irish played all three last
autumn, coming out all even with
PLAYING TONIGHT

one win, one loss and on tie. They]
beat Purdue 30-9, were adughter-
ed by Michigan State 35-0, and
managed to salvage a tie with
Iowa 20-20.
* * *
MICHIGAN STATE, a member
of the Big Ten in everything but
football competition until next
year, will meet some far-flung
foes. The Spartans will play Ore-
gon State on the, coast, will meet
the Texas Aggies at Macklin Field,
and will also play host to Penn
State and Syracuse.
The University of Pittsburgh
is another popular opponent for
Big Ten teams. The Panthers
will play Iowa, Indiana and
Ohio State.
Pitt will also take on Notro
Dame, Oklahoma and Army, which
along with the Western Conf;-
ence opposition should give the
Smoky City lads a busy season.

Fountain Pens
Greeting Cards
Stationery
Office Supplies
Typewriters
W/C Tape &
Wire Recorders
Steel Desks,
Chairs, Piles
3.MORRI LL'S
314 S. State

-.
I C
Phone
7177

Open Saturdays until 1 P.M.

FINAL SUMMER PROGRAM
LAST TIMES TONIGHT
DOORS OPEN 5:40 P.M.
CONTINUOUS SHOWINGS FROM
5:45 P.M.
FEATURE SHOWN 3 TIMES NIGHTLY
SECOND SHOW 7:15 - LAST SHOW 9:30
(See Time Schedule Below)
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
MASTERPIECE OF SUSPENSE
"THE LADY VANISHES"
A GAUMONT-BRITISH PICTURE
MICHAEL MARGARET PAUL DAME MAY
REDGRAVE LOCKWOOD LUKAS WHITTY
"BRILLIANT comedy ... BRILLIANT melodrama. . . when your sides
are not aching from laughter, your brain is throbbing in its attempts
to outguess the director . , . we cannot conceal our admiration.",
-N.Y. Times
ALSO
PARE LORENTZ'S
POETIC STUDY OF THE MISSISSIPPI
"THE RIVER"
A MASTERPIECE OF THE AMERICAN SCREEN
MUSIC BY VIRGIL THOMPSON

I

i
M
M
4
M
M
M
%
I

I

I

COOL

COOL

NOW SHOWING
Roaring EXCITEMENT at the
Crossroads of the West! 4

. x '

"MARU MARU"
with * ERROL FLYNN
_and
"Bugles in
The Afternoon"
with 0 RAY MILLAND

BEGINS SEPT. 2
Prepare quickly for
a business position
In nine months to eighteen
months you con be ready for
an office position such as:
Secretary Bookkeeper
Accountant Office Clerk
Stenographer Typist

In Military Service:

WE

* ~ ~ I

I

I

I

...,.,. r ,,.

I

)l

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan