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August 08, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-08-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SharpNoteI
My Song Takes Second,
Duke of Luliwater Third

_ins Hambletonian

IVY AND EVY:
Wisconsin, Iowa Coached by 'MV' Mein

GoSHEN, N. Y. - () - Sharp
Note, a $1,000 bargain colt, was
driven to a smashing victory in
the $87,637.55 Hambletonian State
yesterday by a 74-year-old veteran
of the Spanish American War.
Bi Shively thus became the old-
est man to drive a Hambletonian
victor, as he took the second and
third heats of the famous trotting
draby for C. W. Clark, a Dearborn,
Mich., took and die manufacturer.
THE WINNER thrashed 15 of
the best sophomore trotters in the

College Stars
Tapering Off
DELAFIELD, Wis. -- (EP) - The
College All-Stars began tapering
off football practice session yes-
terday in preparation for their
Aug. 15 game against the world
professional champion Los Ange-
les Rams in Chicago's Soldier
Field.
Head coach Bobby Dodd said
only limited drills remain on this
week's agenda.
The All-Stars will arrive in Chi-
cago -Tuesday.
Meanwhile, at Redland, Calif.,
coach Joe Stydahar of the Rams
canceled a drill session because
' his staff opined the pros were be-
ing overtrained. He gave his squad
a day of rest.

world, including Duke of Lullwater
the 1951 two-year-old champion
and favorite to win this big har-
ness event.
Duke of Lullwater did no bet-
ter than third money, as the
Goshen jinx continued to hang
over him. He has never won a
race here, but has been unbeat-
able at other tracks.
Hit Song won the opening ,heat,
with the Duke second. Sharp Note
broke stride in that heat and fin-
ished tenth. But he was the boss
from then on.
In the overall finish, Hit Song
was second.
* * *
THE RACE had been postponed
from Wednesday because of rain,
and the start of the day's acti-
vities before some 15,000 specta-
tors was delayed almost an hour
and a half as workers scraped mud
from the course and sprinkled
sand on the wet surface.
Hit Song, driven by Harry
Pownall, won the first heat in
2:05, as Duke of Lullwater, driv-
en by Johnny Simpson, broke
stride but got up to take place,
with Scotch Victor third.
Shively said he was too anxious
to get away in the first heat, and
Sharp Note broke stride.
* * * C
SHARP NOTE was clocked at
2:02 3-5. for the second heat, as
Duke of Lullwater nosed out Hit
Song for place.

Worsham,
Cooper Top
First Round
CHICAGO-Lew Worsham and
Pete Cooper whacked seven-under-
par 65's to pace a, par-rocking first
round yesterday in the $90,000
"World Championship of Golf."
The scent of a $25,000 first
prize, greatest in the game's his-
tory, inspired Worsham, 1947 U.S.
Open champion, and Cooper to
fire identical rounds of 32-33.
TWO STROKES behind at 67
were Roberto De Vicenzo, talented
Argentine shooter from Buenos
Aires, and still another pro, Har-
ry Todd of Dallas, Tex.
After that the scoring traffic
became thicks at gaily-decorated
Tam O'Shanter course where
more than 12,000 golf devotees
turned out.
In the triple sideshow to the
rich pro scramble, most attention
was centered on the $12,000 Wo-
men's World Pro in which Betty
Jameson, the consistent San An-
tonio campaigner, grabbed a one-
stroke lead by matching men's par
72.
The World men and women
amateur sections were headed re-
spectively by Bill Campbell of
Huntington, W. Va., with a spark-
ing 68 and young Joyce Ziske of
Waterford, Wis., who carded 77.

NATIONAL
Brooklyn . . .66
New York ..62;
St. Louis ...61
Philadelphia 54
Chicago . ...52
Boston......42
Cincinnati ..43
Pittsburgh ..30

LEAGUE
32 .673
37 .626
44 .581
47 .535
51 .505
58 .420
62 .410
79 .275

Major League Standings
(not including last night=s games)

(Final in the Series)
By IVAN KAYE
Michigan luckily does not have
to play Wisconsin this year.
The closest this University will
came to Badger football will be
the bench where Ivan Williamson,
one-time Wolverine star end and
captain of the 1932 Big Ten and
National Champions, will direct
the Wisconsin squad.

41/i
8%
131/
161/
25
261 2
411,J

AMERICAN
W
New York ..64
Cleveland ...60
Boston.....56
Wsahington 56
Philadelphia 52
Chicago ....54
St. Louis ...45
Detroit.....36
TODAY'S

LEAGUE
L Pet.
45 .582
47 .561
47 .544
50 .528
49 .515
53 .505
63 .417
69 .343
GAMES

i

GB
3
5
6%/
8
9
181,
26

TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Boston (night)
-Jansen (11-7) vs Surkont 6-
10).
Brooklyn at Philadelphia
night)--Van Cuyk (5-6) vs.
Simmons (10-4).
Chicago at Pittsburgh (night)
--Rush (11-9) vs Dickson (9-
16).
St. Louis at Cincinnati (night)
-Chambers (4-2) vs Blackwell
(2,12).

Cleveland at St. Louis (night)
-Feller (8-11) vs Pillette (7-10)
or Byrne (6-11).
Detroit at Chicago 2, (twi-
night)-Hoeft (2-4) and Hout-
teman (6-14) vs Pierce (11-7)
and Dobsen (9-9).
Philadelphia at Washington
(night)-Kellner (8-10) vs Mar-
rero (8-5).
Boston at New York (night)
-Parnell (8-6) vs Sain (9-3).

COACH WILLIAMSON, who ca-
vorted on Ferry Field back in 1932
under the watchful eye of a young
assistant named Bennie Ooster-
baan, has brought Wisconsin to a
position in the Western Confer-
ence which the Badgers have not
enjoyed since the days of Dave
Schreiner.
According to the folks up in
Madison, 1952 is Wisconsin's
year. Nothing less than a con-
ference title and a Rose Bowl
victory will satisfy the rabid
partisans of the Cardinal and
White.
Badger fans are still smarting
over last year's early season 14-10
loss to Illinois which cost them
the conference 'laurels. The Ilhini
were decidedly outplayed, but
managed-to pull the game out of
the fire with a last quarter touch-
down. The disheartened Badgers
were caught on the downgrade by
an inferior Ohio Statesquad the
following week and held to a 6-6
tie. Ohio was almost run out of
Camp Randallastadium by even
the disspirited Wisconsin team,

Yanks Divide with Senators;
Athletics, Red Sox Split Two

* * It

CIRIUINES/ME i

i

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Bob Kuzava
limited Washington to four hits
to capture his sixth decision as the
New York Yankees defeated the
Senators, 7-1, in the second game
of a double-header yesterday aft-
er Washington won the first game,
4-2.
The Yankees blasted Don John-
son for a 5-0 lead in the first
three innings of the second game
and increased it to 7-0 against
Randy Gumpert in the fifth inning
when Gene Woodling slammed his
ninth homer after Yogi Berra
walked.
Julio Moreno survived a 12-hit
Yankee attack in the first game
to post a victory.
Jim McDonald, who went the
distance for the Yankees in the
opener, was nicked for two runs
in the -first inning.
New York picked up a run in the
third. But the Senators lifted their
lead to 3-1 in the, fourth.
The Yankees got a run in the
sixth, but Washington boosted the
score to its final proportions in
the eighth.
The split enabled the Yankees
to retain their 3-game lead over
second place Cleveland.

GIANTS 8, DODGERS 2
NEW YORK-The never-quit
New York Giants slashed Brook-
lyn's league lead to 4, games
by blasting the Dodgers, 8-2, un-
der a 12-hit avalanche. It was
the first game of a day-night
double-header.
* * *
RED SOX 5-8, A's 7-4
PHILADELPHIA - The third
place Boston Red Sox held their
own in the American League pen-
nant race yesterday by splitting
with the Philadelphia Athletics,
winning the second game, 8-4, aft-
er the A's grabbed the opener, 7-5.
Al Benton turned in a bril-
liant relief job in winning the
second game, his first decision
of the current season. He held
the A's to two hits in the last
four and two-thirds innings aft-
er starter Willard Nixon and his
relief, Ralph Brickner, almost
blew a seven-run lead.
The Red Sox win kept them
five games in back of the league
leading New York Yankees,
Eddie Joost hit a homer in the
first while big Gus Zernial con-
tributed two-his 20th and 21st of
the season-to bat in five of the
Philadelphia runs in the opener.

I

Leading Batters
By The Associated Press
Leading batsmen based on 200
at, bats (not including last
night's games).
NATIONAL LEAGUE
G AB R H Pet
Musial, S. L. 105 391 73 139 .333
Addis, Chi, 69 235 31 73 .311
HOME RUNS
Sauer, Chicago ... . .... . . ..."...27
Hodges, Brooklyn .".. ..22
RUNS BATTED IN
Sauer, Chicago ............88
Thompson, New York ........74

.
3
1

FORREST EVASHEVSKI
...as Michigan quarterback
* * *
and Coach Woody Hayes was more
than glad td'settle for a deadlock.
* * *
THE PRE-SEASON experts
think that while Illinois is still the
team to beat, any faltering by the
lads from Champaign will bring
either Wisconsin or Purdue to the
front.
Since the Illini cannot return
to the Rose Bowl, the Pasadena
pitcure narrows to the Badgers
and Boilermakers. Things could
be decisively settled if the two
played each other, but they
don't. Both, however, will play
Illinois. Wisconsin must face
the defending champions on the
second weekend of the season,
and the Badgers will have to be
in mid-season form if they ex-
pect to win. Purdue doesn't meet
the Illini until the fifth game of
the year.
Wisconsin opens with Marquette,
Illinois will begin the season with
Iowa State. Neither Marquette nor
Iowa States are exactly power-
houses, and neither can be expect-
ed to take too much out of the
Big Ten squads. (Let the reader
contrast these openers with Mich-'
igan. Tackling Michigan State and
then he will begin to see why the
Davey To Battle
Rock y Graziano
CHICAGO-(W)-Chuck Davey,
undefeated in 35 bouts as a wel-
terweight contender, signed yes-
terday to meet Rocky Graziano,
former middleweight champion, in
a 10-round bout in the Chicago
Stadium Sept. 17.

Wolverines face one of the rough-
est schedules in the land.)
COACH WILLIAMSON is pre-
sented with a few pressing re-
placement problems. He must find
a quarterback to direct his "T"
formation offence. The Badgers
lost the imaginative Johny Coatta
through graduation. Losing a de-
fensive end of the caliber of Pat
O'Donahue may weaken the other-
wise solid defensive set-up.
The Wisconsin running attack
will be built around the amaz-
ing Alan Ameche, who establish-
ed a conference ground-gaining
record of 774 yards in his fresh-
man year. Nicknamed "The
Horse" Ameche will present a
strong bid for All-America hon-
ors if he can come anywhere
near last year's performance.
All in all, it look like another
banner year for the Badgers. There
is still the early season hurdle in
Illinois, but seventeen veteran let-
termen may Ahelp Williamson and
Wisconsin clear it.
* * *
ANOTHER former Michigan
great is back in the Big Ten.
Forest Evashevski embarks on
his first year as head coach of
the University of Iowa Hawk-
eyes.
Evashevski, fresh from two suc-
cessful years as head coach of
Washington State, is bringing
about a change in the Hawkeye
offense. In these times when most
schools are shifting to the "T" for-
mation, Evashevski is changing to
the Michigan style single wing at-
tack. It was as quarterback of
Fritz Crisler's first teams at Mich-
igan in 1938-39-40 that Evashev-
ski gained fame. It was he who
threw the vicious blocks that sent
the great Tommy Harmon on the
way to touchdowns and national
prominence.
* -.* *
EVASHEVSKI inherits a team
from his predessessor Len Raffen-
sberger which 'is supposed to wind
up in the conference basement.
Graduation took twenty-two let-
termen from a squad which fin-
ished last in 1951.
Evashevski has a fine passer
in Burt Britzman and a shifty
breakaway runner in George
1"Dusty" Rice, but replaceing Bill
Reichardt at fullback is a mighty
tough order. Reichardt was the
Big Ten's most valuable player
last season.
The schedule is not conducive to
winning, ' with Illinois, Purdue,
Wisconsin, Ohio State and Notre
Dame on the card.
Iowa, like every one of the other
so-called weak sisters in the Big
Ten is capable of playing that one
good game. They waited until the
season finale against Notre Dame
to do it last year, and the result
was a 20-20 tie, which was a great
moral victory for the Hawkeyes.

FOR SALE
ANTIQUE. CHAIRS- 1 Hitchcock, 1
Duncan Fyfe, 1 arm Windsor, I comb
back Windsor. 1 tilt top table Mis-
cellaneous objects :candle sticks,
A lamps, dishes, fixtures. 1918 Day Ph.
2-1710.
ART SALE private collection, oils, water
colors. portfolios, books. 1918 Day,
Phone 2-1710.
a HOUSE TRAILER-1 wall with built in
book case. 30 ft. "cozy-coach". has
natural wood finish throughout, elec-
tric refrigerator, electric hot water
heater. Very liberal terms. Can be
seen at 410 E. Jeff.
r FOR SALE-Silver Tint Mouton Coat,
% %length. Almost new. 1028 Stock-
well.

FOR SALE

LINGUAPHONE SPANISH COURSE -
Records and text. $35. Phone 2-8871.
OLDS CONVERTIBLE 1937-R & H, new
top, excellent condition. Call 3-8266
after 6.
FOR RENT
AVAILABLE - A new 3-room de-
luxe apartment which accommodates
four. Completely furnished, electric
stove and refrigerator. Private en-
trance. $95 per month. Will rent for
summer. Need a car. Call 2-9020.
NEAR CAMPUS - Unfurnished 4 room
ap't-tile bath, no heat nor utilities.
Has stove and refrigerator. No pets.
School-age child preferred. $95. Ph.
6465.
MALE STUDENT to share basement
ap't; good location. Private room. $30
per mo. Ph. 5830.
ATTRACTIVE APT. near Campus to
sublet July 15 to Sept. 15. Real bar-
gain for right tenant. 3-1479 evenings.
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
tions at The Campus Tourist Homes
now. 518 E. William. Phone 3-8454.
4 STUDENTS-large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds. (practice
room available for music students.)
$125 a month. Also single room 320 It.
Washington after 4 P.M.

4

STRADIVARIOUS VIOLIN, case, in fine
condition. Call 2-1661, 7 to 10 a.m.

PORTABLE TYPEWRITER-Smith-Cor-
ona Skywrite, like new. Call 3-1511,
Ext. 2841. "
WHOOPEE-we're back with our August
quota of student specials. So sorry to
have been quiet but we wuz swamped
with orders in July. Once again we
offer Time at $3.00 per yr.: 6c each-
cheaper than your daily newspaper.
Life at $4.00; and many more. Just
phone 6007 and place your order. Stu-
dent Periodical Agency.
MEN'S ENGLISH BIKE-Headlight, car-
rier, good condition. Ph. 2-8278.

ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMBRIDGE 1430-1 double, 1 single
for men.
ROOMS FOR FALL - 906 Greenwood
apartment, double & singles. Refrig-
erator privileges, hollywood beds, De-
troit landlord. Call Jack Bergstrom
2-7108 or write Stu Hertzberg, 1-7617
Ohio, Detroit, Mich.
ATTRACTIVE, comfortable rooms for
grad. students or prof. men. 1402 Hill.
Ph. 2-3781.
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING - Reasonable rates. Accurate.
Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 S. Main.
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.
ALTERATIONS -- Woman's garments.
Prompt service. Catherine St. near
State. Call A. Graves, Ph. 2-2678.
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T. V
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & TI V
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1% blocks east of East Engin.
ALTERATIONS on ladies garments re-
serve for future use. A. Graves.
Phone 2-2678.
HELP WANTED
INTERVIEWERS for part time opinion
surveys. College background preferred.
not essential. Experience not neces-
sary. Answer fully. Box 18.
EARN MONEY at opening of Fall semes-
ter by working in spare time. Men
and coeds needed. Phone 6007.
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED to Kallispel , Mont.
Leave about Aug. 11. Phone 7138.
2 or 3 RIDERS WANTED-Driving to
Kansas City, Missouri. August 1 or 2.
References: exchange phone 2-3006 be-
tween 6 and 7 p.m.
RIDERS WANTED to San Diego, Calif.
Leave Aug. 15th. References exchang-
ed. Call 8177, ask for Norm Rost.
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD AND ROOM at 1026 Oakland.
$280.00 a semester. Make reservations
before Wed., Aug. 13. Phone 2-8269.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

AMERICAN LEAGUE
G AB R H
Fain, Phila. 92 355 55 122
Woodling, NY 86 283 40 93
Kell, Boston 96 364 47 117

Pct.
.344
.329
.321

HOME RUNS
Doby, Cleveland ............24
Berra, New York........ . ..23
RUNS BATTED IN
Doby, Cleveland......78
Robinson, Chicago .........76

READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
* i
Cinema, SL 11d/4
FINAL SUIMMER PROGRAM
TONIGHT and SATURDAY
DOORS OPEN 5:40 P.M.
CONTINUOUS SHOWINGS FROM
5:45 P.
FEATURE SHOWN 3 TIMES NIGHTLY
SECOND SHOW 7:15 - LAST SHOW 9:30
(See Time Schedule Below)
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
MASTERPIECE OF SUSPENSE
"THE LADY VANISHES"
A GAUMONT-BRITISH PICTURE
MICHAEL MARGARET PAUL DAME MAY
REDGRAVE LOCKWOOD LUKAS WHITTY
"BRILLIANT comedy .. . BRILLIANT melodrama . .. when your sides
are not aching from laughter, your brain is throbbing in its attempts
to outguess the director . .. we cannot conceal our admiration."
-N.Y. Times
ALSO
PARE LORENTZ'S
POETIC STUDY OF THE MISSISSIPPI
"THE RIVER"
A MASTERPIECE OF THE AMERICAN SCREEN
' 1tlMtl' 6v v nn. ttw_ . ". wa

(Continued from Page 2)
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Glen Rus-
sell Rasmussen, Education; thesis: "The
Relationship between the Teacher's
Membership in Informal Groups and
his Potential for Feelings of Profes-
sional Failure," Friday, August 8, 1439
University Elementary School, at 10:00
a.m. Chairman, A. F. Zander.
The Inter-University Seminar on So-
cial Integration will hold a round table
discussion regarding its activities in
the East Conference Room of the Rack-
ham Building on Tuesday the 12th of
August, at 8:00 p.m. Graduate students
in Sociology and staff members of the
Sociology Department are invited to at-
tend.
Concerts
Student Recital: Grace Miller, pianist,
will be heard at 8:30 Monday evening,
August 11, in the Rackham Assembly
Hall, presenting a program in lieu of
a thesis for the degree of Master of Mu-
sic in Music Education, It wil include
works by Bach, Beethoven, Brahms,
Chanler, and Bartok, and will be open
to the public. Mrs. Miller is studying
with Benning Dexter.
Student Recital: David Helm, student
of piano with Helen Titus, will pre-
sent a program in lieu of a thesis in
partial fulfillment of the Master of
Music degree requirements at 4:15 Tues-
day afternoon, August 12, in the Rack-
ham Assembly Hall. It will include
Ta l El T mE

compositions by Haydn, Beethoven, Hin-
demith and Chopin. The public is in-
vited.
Student Recital: James Vandersall,
violinist, will present a program in par-
tial fulfillment of the requirements
for the Master of Music degree, at 8:30
Tuesday evening, August 12, in the
Rackham Assembly Hall. He will play
,ompositions by Tartini, Sibelius, and
Saint-Saens. Mr. Vandersall studies
with Gilbert Ross.
Student Recital: Roland Samber, pi-
anist, will be heard at 4:15 Wednesday
afternoon, August 13, in the Rackham
Assembly Hall, playing a program in
partial fulfillment of the requirements
for the Master of Music degree. It will
include works by Bach, Beethoven. Cho-
pin, Granados, Ravel, and Copland, and
will be open to the public. Mr. Samber
is a pupil of Benning Dexter.
Student Recital: Carol Tannenbaum,
pianist, will be heard at 8:30 Wednesday
evening, August 13, in the Rackham
Lecture Hall, playing a program in par-
tial fulfillment of the requirements for
the Master of Music degree. It will in-
clude compositions by Scarlatti, Bach,
Strawinsky andbDebussy, and will be
open to the public. Miss Tannenbaum
is a pupil of Ava Comin Case.
Carillon Recital by Sidney Giles, As-
sistant University Carilloneur, 7:15,
Thursday evening, August 14. The pro-
gram will open with Franssen's Gon-
doliera, for Carillon, followed by selec-
tions from Verdi's Il Trovatore, Delibes'
Sylvia, and Saint-Saens' Samson and
Delilah. It will continue with Suite for
Carillon by Nees, and close with three
popular tunes, I Dream of Jeannie, My
Wild Irish Rose, and All Through the
Night.
Student Recital Cancelled: The organ
recital by Elizabeth Thomas, previous-
ly announced for Thursday evening,
August 14, in Hill Auditorium, has been
cancelled.
Exhibitions

11
Michigan Historical Collections, 160
Rackham Building. The changing Cam-
pus.
Clements Library. American books
which have influenced the modern mind
(through September 1).
Architecture Building. Student work.
Events Today
Opera, presented by the School of
Music and the Department of S3peech.
The Merry Wives of Windsor, by Otto
Nicolai. 8:00 p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn
theater.
Informal record dance in the League
Ballroom. Dancing is from 9 until mid-
night and the admission is free to stu-
dents.
The Fresh Air Camp Clinic will be
held at the camp on Patterson Lake,
at 8:00 p.m. Dr. RaBinovitch, Assoc.
Prof. of Psychiatry: in Charge of Chil-
dren's Service, Neurpsychiatric Insti-
tute, will be the discussant.
Motion Pictures, August 8 and 9:
Michael Redgrave, Margaret Lockwood
in Alfred Hitchcock's "The Lady Van-
ishes." Also Pare Lorentz's "The River,"
"The Loon's Necklace" and W. C.
Fields Comedy. Architecture Auditori-
um. Admission 50c. Complete shows
start at 6:00; 7:15; and 9:30 p.m.
Examination Schedule
In Eight-Week Courses
Time of Class
Meeting Time of Examination
8:00 a.m. 8:00 a.m., Thurs. Aug. 14
9:00 a.m. 8:00 a.m., Friday, Aug. 15
10:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m., Thurs., Aug. 14
11:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m., Friday, Aug. 15
1:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m., Thurs., Aug. 14
2:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m., Thurs., Aug. 14
3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m., Friday, Aug. 15
Other hours 4:00 p.m., .Friday, Aug. 15
U I

ARE YOU ELIGIBLE?
in Ann Arbor it's the
VFW CLUB
* Dancing Fri. & Sat. Nights
* Two Fine Orchestras
.4.Mary Lou, Vocalist

Members
V-T * Wand Guests
CI..u S Ph. 2-3972
RENTALS &i BANQUETS

MARY LOU
Vocalist
HALL

r

I

GOOD NEWS FOR TEACHERS'
AND OTHER
SCHOOL
EMPLOYEES
ABOUT
AUTO INSURANCE
You can now insure in a company that issues a policy designed
especially for school people. In fact, it is a polciy restricted exclus-
ively to this class of car owners (and their husbands or wives).
It offers you' not only all of the common forms of automobile insur-
ance coverage but also many others, such as "member-collision"
coverage, no matter who is to blame-liability coverage when driv-
ing other cars--and up to $5.00 a day for transportation if your
car is stolen.
Find out about the many other benefits that our school-employee
insurance offers you before you renew your present policy. Write
or phone:
MICHIGAN EDUCATIONAL EMPLOYEES
MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY

COOL

COOL

-t
ENDING TODAY
MI .T'T

Playing Through Saturday

Collegiate Cuts
to please
7 BARBERS
NO WAITING
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

I

Museum of Art, Selections from the
Permanent Collection.
General Library. Dictionaries.
Museum of Archaeology. Ancient
Egypt and Rome of the Empire.
Museums Building. Rotunda exhibit.
Some museum techniques.

906 Hammond Bldg

Detroit 26, Mich.

HAPPY?

I

Woodward 2-6988 ... Woodward 2-2574
An Estimate Returned
Upon Receipt of Coupon
r----------------------------.
IM' PQnn I

Ar .. 7011 You

bet he is ... he drove

ou right thru for

ffmL- Ia. - AL - A im um I

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