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August 06, 1952 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1952-08-06

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ALSOP BROTHERS
See Page 2

Latest Deadline in the State

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CLOUDY AND WARM

CLOUDY AND WARM

VOL. LXII, No. 201

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1952

FOUR PAGES

FOUR PAGES

ARBORWA

USE

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va Aff
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OTED

DO

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*

*

*

* *

- s - -

lger,PotterHead GOP Ticket,

- - *

* $ It'

- * -

Meader Wins
. Hands Down
In GOP Race
DeVine, Okborn
Get County Jobs
By HARRY LUNN
Incumbent Republican Con-
gressman George Meader pulled
into a runaway lead early this
morning in, his one-sided renomi-
nation fight in Washtenaw County.
With approximately 20 of the
county's 55 precincts reporting,
Meader had 7047 votes compared
'with 1033 for Norman Sulier and
853 for Arthur Lopshire in the
GOP primary.
On the Democratic side, Univer-
sity law professor John Dawson
rolled up 1960 votes out of these
F precincts. He had no opposition
for the nomination.
* * -
THE BALANCE of reported pre-
cincts were those in which voting
machines had been used. Through-
out the rest of the county, officials
were working into the early morn-
ing hours on the tedious job of
hand-counting the record smash-
ing vote.
In Washtenaw County the
GOP nomination is virtually
tantamount to election, and seve
eral Republican contests devel-
oped into sharp pre-primary
battles.
In the GOP race for countY
prosecutor, Edmond F. DeVine took
a commanding lead in a field of
four contendors. DeVine, a Univer-
sity law professor and chief assist-
ant to incumbent prosecutor Doug-
las Reading led with 2889 votes as
The Daily went to press.
Following behind him were Leo-
nard Young with 1278 votes, John
Rae with 1065 and William F. Ag-
er, Jr. with 899. Louis Andrews
was ahead in the Democratic col-
umn with 967 votes, while his only
opponent, Aaron Priebe, had 235.
INCUMBENT sheriff John L.
Osborn held his own in the GOP
election fight garnering 3799 tal-
lies against 2138 for his opponent
Robert W. Winnick. Though these
are incomplete returns, Osborn ap-
pears to hold a comfortable lead.
Lawrence Oltersdorf, the only
Democrat running for the sher-
iff's job piled up 996 votes on
incomplete returns.
>- Other county races had only one
candidate running for each party,
but in every case the Republican
candidate was chalking up bigger
totals.
In the contest for state senator
from this district, Republican can-
didate George N. Higgins led his
opponent Richard D. Kuhn by a
vote of 3124 to 2029 on incom-
plete returns. Running all by him-
self on the Democratic side was
Leonard D. Bennett who had rack-
ed up 1837 votes at latest count.
There was no contest for state
legislator from either the Ann Ar-
bor or Ypsilanti districts, as each
party had only one candidate in
the field in each case.

-Daily-Jack Bergstrom
LOCAL CAR DEALER IN COOPERATION WITH LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTE TAKES CITIZEN
MRS. JOSEPH MARREY TO POLLS
Reds Convicted in California

Sen. Moody
Wins Easy
Nomination
Huge Vote Cast
In State Contests
DETROIT-Reports of voting in
Michigan's summer primary in
some 20 per cent of the 4,458 pre-
cincts today showed Fred M. Al-
ger Jr. forging farther ahead in
the bitterly-contested race for the
Republican gubernatorial nomi-
nation.
Congressman Charles E. Potter
took an even more convincing lead
in the Republican race for nomi-
nation to the senate.
THE SCRAMBLE for the GOP
nomination for lieutenant-gover-
nor was still anybody's race.
Alger was showing strength in
the early returns in every sec-
tion of the state, polling 86,-
060 votes in 974 precincts.
Lieut. Gov. William C. Vanden-
berg was dropping a little far-
ther behind, counting 59,760 votes.
He was leading only moderately in
his home Ottawa county, and was
trailing in most other western
Michigan counties where he had
hoped for his greatest strength.
Former State Police Commis-
sioner Donald S. Leonard was run-
ning third at 47,061.
POTTER, strong in his northern
congressional district, was getting
surprisingly good votes in Wayne
and other southeastern counties.
His total in 931 precincts stood
at 84,755.
This was nearing a two to one
majority over Auditor General
John B. Martin Jr., who was
showing real strength only in
his home Kent county., His cur-
rent total is 25,581.
Dr. Eugene C. Keyes had picked
up 19,234 votes and Clifford E.
Prevost 1,910.
STATE SENATOR Clarence A.
Reid of Detroit just led the race
for the Republican lieutenant gov-
ernor nomination with 21,868
in 371 precincts.
George Welsh, former Grnd
Rapids mayor, stood at 21,398 votes
David E. Young, former state rep-
resentative, at 18,414 and Harry
Henderson, former Liquor Com-
missioner, 15,278.
SENATOR Blair Moody was far
in front for the Democratic nom-
ination to succeed himself. He
had 21,390 votes from 289 pre-
cincts to 4,421 for Louis C.
Schwinger.
Governor Williams, unopposed
for renomination by the Demo-
crats had polled 23,433 confi-
dence votes in 178 precincts.
Michigan voters turned out in
what appeared to be recard-break-
ing numbers for their hot weather
primary.
Tolstoy Lecture
At EightTonight
"Tolstoy, the Man, and His Fam-
ily" will be the topic of a lecture
by his granddaughter, Marie Tol-
stoy, visiting instructor in Rus-
sian, at 8 p.m. tonight in Rackham
Assembly Hall.

Ing results on
amusement tax

-Daily-Jack Bergstrom
GOP POWWOW - Mayor Brown points to early returns for
George Meader as State Chairman Owen J. Cleary looks on.
* *" * *
Can11didates, Wooing Both
Negro andMDixie Voters
By The Associated Press
Behind the scenes in both political camps, tense jockeying went
forward as Stevenson and Eisenhower forces sought to woo the tra-
ditionally Democratic "Solid South" without offending advocates of
civil rights legislation.
Gov. Adlai Stevenson of Illinois, the Democratic Presidential
nominee, conferred for 90 minutes with Mississippi's Gov. Hugh
White, and White later told newsmen he was sure Stevenson
would "solidify the South" wherever he appears in the forthcom-
ing campaign.
White refused to say, however, whether he thought Stevenson
would get the support of Virginia, South Carolina and Louisiana.

Ward
1
2
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
6
6
7
7
I,
S

Precinct
1
2
3
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
3
4
TOTALS

the defeated
amendment.
Yes No
155 449
139 325
216 380
294 495
257 463
361 409
95 261
98 418
154 225
202 364
279 320
146 482-
237 382
305 384
373 370
3311 5727

price

f*

-- - -

Two-to-One
Vote Ousts
Amendment
Brown Sees No
Third Attempt
By VIRGINIA VOSS
Ann Arbor voters downed the
city's ten per cent amusement tax
proposal for the second time this
year by a nearly two to one defeat
in local elections yesterday.
If passed, the charter amend-
ment would have given the city
power to "levy and collect a speci-
fic excise tax of not more than
ten per cent upon the established
The following figures indi-
cate precinct-by-precinct vote

LOS ANGELES-(ft--Fourteen
California Communist leaders were
convicted yesterday on a federal
indictment charging that they
conspired to teach and advocate
overthrowing the government by
force and violence.
They are in jail pending a hear-
ing at 11 a.m. today on a defense
motion urging U. S. Judge William
C. Mathes to reverse the unani-
mous verdict of the jury of eight
women and four men.
THE JURORS had the case un-
der deliberation from Thursday
afternoon until late yesterday.
Their verdict against each de-
fendant was unanimous.
The trial has lasted six
months, compared with nine
months required to try and con-
vict 11 top Communists in New
York in 1949. 'The charges are

virtually identical, the maximumj
penalties being five years in
prison, $10,000 fine, or both.
Thirteen of the California de-
dfendants have been at liberty
under $5,000 and $10,000 bond.
The 14th, Mrs. Oleta O'Connor
Yates, 43, San Francisco, North-
ern California party secretary,
was jailed June 26 by Judge
Mathes for contempt of court for
refusing to answer questions about
other persons suspected of being
Communists.
* * *
IN ADDITION to Mrs. Yates,
the defendants are:
William Schneiderman, 46,
San Francisco, former state par-
ty chairman accused by the FBI
of being the party's acting na-
tional chief when he was ar-
rested last August.

'MET' CONDUCTOR:
Opera Should Be Given
In English, Blatt Says

Philip M. Connelly, 48; Dorothy
Rosenblum Healy, 37; Henry Stein-
berg, 39; Mrs. Rose Chernin Kus-
nitz, 49; Frank Carlson, 40; Frank
E. Spector, 56, and Ben Dobbs,
41, all of Los Angeles.
Mrs. Loretta Starvus Stack, 40;
Al Richmond, 39; Ernest Otto Fox,
47, Carl Rude Lambert, 55, all of
San Francisco; and Albert Jason
Lima, 45, Oakland.
Originally there was a 15th de-
fendant, Mary Bernadette Doyle.
She became ill early in the trial
and may be tried later.
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
Farouk's Property .. .
CAIRO, Egypt-Egypt's reform
government list night seized the
properties of exiled Ex-King Fa-
rouk, valued in some estimates
at more than two billion dollars.
The cabinet appointed a two-man
board to administer them.
It is generally believed that the
properties will be distributed by
the government as part of a vast
new land reform program now
under consideration by Premier
Aly Maher and his cabinet.
Ike's Speech . .
LOS ANGELES-Gen. Dwight
D. Eisenhower declared last night
that the earnings of the people
must be protected from "a double
toll of high prices and high
taxes."
In a speech billed in advance
as non-political, Eisenhower also
touched on the civil rights issue
with a pledge to make "America's
promise of equality a living fact
for every American."
Addressing the annual encamp-
ment of the Veterans of Foreign
Wars in Los Angeles, Eisenhower
set forth a 10-point program aim-
ed at lasting peace, honesty in gov-
ernment and loyalty in federal
service.
* * *

City Asked To
Annex Outer
'U' Property
The University Monday night
formally asked the city to annex
four parcels of land, including the
new North Campus area and the
University Golf Course.
The two other parcels are the
Botanical Gardens just south of
E. Stadium Blvd., and property
known as the James Inglis estate
fronting on Highland Rd.
A total of 455 acres is involved.
EDWARD A. Cummiskey, Uni-
versity attorney, submitted the
petition in letter form to the City
Council Monday night. The Coun-
cil referred the matter to its or-
dinance committee.
Annexation of the sites would
facilitate extension of city sew-
age and water facilities to the
property.
Cumminsky cited a state law
which holds that land owned by
the state can be annexed by a ma-
jority vote of the city concerned
and approval of the township,
without regard to whether the
property in question is occupied.
There are residents in both the
Botanical Gardens and the Inglis
property. The projected use of the
latter site has never been officially
disclosed.

WHITE SAID Stevenson is "all
right" on FEPC-creation of a fed-
eral Fair Employment Practices
Commission-if Stevenson's views
have been published correctly.
Stevenson has said he thinks
the states should handle the
problem of job discrimination,
with the federal government
stepping in only if the states
fail to handle the job.
The Illinois governor moved to
tighten his Southern lines still
furthes by arranging conferences
today with two of his unsuccess-
ful rivals for the Democratic nom-
ination-Sen. Richard B. Russell
of Georgia and Sen. Estes Ke-
fauver of Tennessee.
IN DENVER, conjecture arose
that Eisenhower might be shift-
ing ground somewhat on the issue'
after a group of Republican Negro
leaders visited the general Mon-
day and later endorsed his can-
didacy.
As viewed in some quarters,
that might sound as though
Eisenhower had given the Ne-
gro leaders cause for-hope in
their struggle to put civil rights
under control of the federal
governmentinstead of the states.
In past statements, Eisenhower
has said the handling of civil
rights should be left mainly to
the states.

to 26 cents or more" on movies,
concerts, plays, dances and other
amusements.
COMMENTING on the defeat,
Mayor William O. Brown said last
night he would not attempt topt
the issue on the ballot again in a
revised form.
But last week, a city alderman
remarked that the Council had
"worked hard" on the amend-
ment and would get it put to a
vote again if it were defeated
this time.
The amusement tax proposal
went on yesterday's ballot against
strong opposition from the local
Butterfield Theaters, Inc., The
theater-chain claimed that since
voters had defeated the proposal
in the April 7 election, it could not
legally be placed on the ballot
again.
THE CITY contended that the
proposal had been sufficiently
changed by fixing a specific limit
on the tax to warrant its being
placed on the ballot.
Two other city charter amend.
ments were passed by Ann Ar-
bor voters yesterday. Under the
first amendment, the salary of
the municipal judge will be in-
creased from $6,000 to $8,000.
Local voters also voted in an
amendment allowing the city
Clerk 48 hours, instead of 24, to
present minutes of City Council
proceedings to the Mayor.
Cavender Gets
Appointment
To Band Post
George R. Cavender, director of
instrumental music in the Yysi-
lanti public schools, is the new
assistant director of the University
Bands.
His appointment to the band
post and as instructor of wind
instruments in the School of Mu-
sic was announced yesterday.
LAVENDER WILL replace Jack'
Lee who resigned to become asso-
ciate professor and director of
bands at the University of Arizona
in Tuscon.
As Assistant director of bands,
Cavender will work with Prof.
William D. Revelli in drilling
the Marching Band and will be
conductor of the Varsity Band.
While in the Ypsilanti schools,
he helped develop the Boys'
Marching Band into one of the
leading high school units of the
state. The Girl's Drum and Bugle
fmr. in m il n inr- l 'h nr

Late Scores
AMERICAN LEAGUE
St. Louis 5, Detroit 1
Cleveland 6-3, Chicago 0-6
Philadelphia 5, Boston 3
New York 3, Washington 2
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Cincinnati 4, Chicago 0
New York 7, Brooklyn 6
St. Louis 4, Pittsburgh 3
(12 innings)
Philadelphia at Boston, Rain
Political Panel
Set forTodav

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1
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c
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By JOYCE FICKIES
Opera must be presented in
English in order to be widely ap-
preciated in this country, accord-
ing to Joseph Blatt, assistant con-
ductor of the Metropolitan Opera
Company and guest lecturer in
the School of Music.
Since the libretto of an opera
is of equal importance with the
music, both must be understood
by the audience, he said. If it is
not made understandable by per-
forming it in a language famil-
iar to the audience, opera becomes
"snobbish and not a real art
form."
BLATT IS currently directing
the speech department - music
school production of the "Merry
Wives of Windsor," to be present-
ed tomorrow, Friday and Satur-
day evenings at Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
Before coming to campus in
June, the conductor toured with

SINCE THEN Blatt has conduc-
;ed operas in Germany, France,
Italy and England, as well as in
America. He has been guest con-
ductor of most of the majorcor-
chestras in the nation. He has al-
so taught at Vassar and other
schools in Vienna and New York,
for a short time directing the Vi-
enna Conservatory of Music.
College students are entirely
capable of presenting good op-
eras, according to Blatt. "Un-
der expert direction they can do
a very good job."
The quiet, friendly conductor
emphasized that he was "deeply
impressed and amazed" at the
material to be found at the Uni-
versity. The School of Music it-
self, he said, is superior to allbut
the professional schools of music
in the nation, with regard to sup-
plying the student with a com-
plete musical education.

FROM GBS TO OGDEN NASH:
1952-53 Lecture Course Announced
* * * *
"3 Fourteen celebrities highlighted
by the Drama Quartette are in-
cluded in the 1952-53 Lecture
Course announced by the Univer-
:>,, sity Oratorical Association.
a The series opens Oct. 15 with
Drew Pearson, noted news com-
mentator and syndicated colum-
nist, speaking on the latest de-
velopments behind the scenes in
the national canital under the

I

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