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August 01, 1952 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-08-01

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

X

Now$*

i

ELI.'..DS

19TH FOR SHANTZ:

Chances DwindleDon Canham

Athletics Sink Tigers
Twice, 2-1, and 3-2

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Glasses, pink shell-rimmed. Call
Betsy Barbour, 22591-Ext. 308.
LOST - During first week of summer
school -- small gold watch initials
"MOT". Reward. Telephone Mary
Towle at 6722.
FOR SALE
ANTIQUE CHAIRS - 1 Hitchcock, 1
Duncan Fyfe, 1 arm Windsor, 1 comb
back Windsor. 1 tilt top table Mis-
cellaneous objects: candle sticks,
lamps, dishes, fixtures. 1918 Day Ph.
21710.
ART SALE private collection, oils, water
colors, portfolios, books. 1918 Day,
Phone 2-1710.
HOUSE TRAILER-1 wail with built in
boor, case. 30 ft. "cozy-coach". has
natural wood finish throughout, elec-
tric refrigerator, electric hot water
heater. Very liberal terms. Can be
seen at 410 E. Jeff.
FOR SALE-Silver Tint Mouton Coat,
%4 length. Almost new. 1028 Stock-
well.
FOR RENT
AVAILABLE - A new 3-room de-
luxe apartment which accommodates
four. Completely furnished, electric
stove and refrigerator. Private en-
trance. $95 per month. Will rent for
summer. Need a car. Call 2-9020.
r NEAR CAMPUS - Unfurnished 4 room
ap't-tile bath, no heat nor utilities.
Has stove and refrigerator. No pets.
School-age child preferred. $95. Ph.
6465:.
LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS with kit-
chen privileges for 3 or 4 men stu-
dents. Also, senior law student who
has occupied apartment for 2 years
wishes to share. Graduate preferred.
1026 Oakland, phone 2-8269.

FOR RENT

TRANSPORTATION

For U.S. To Wi-n
Russia Still Rules Olympic Games;
Yanks To Face Reds in Basketball

MALE STUDENT to share basement
ap't; good location. Private room. $30
per mo. Ph. 5830.
ATTRACTIVE APT near Campus to
sublet July 15 to Sept. 15. Real bar-
gain for right tenant. 3-1479 evenings,
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUESTS?-Make reserva-
tions at The Campus Tourist Homes
now. 518 E. William. Phone 3-8454.
4 STUDENTS--large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
room available for music students.)
$125 a month. Also single room 320 E.
Washington after 4 P.M.
AVAILABLE-2 single bedrooms for two
men, with kitchen, Phone 22038.
BUSINESS SERVICES
ALTERATIONS -- Woman's garments.
Promptservice. Catherine St. near
State. Call A. Graves, Ph. 2-2678.
TYPING - Reasonable rates. Accurate,
Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 S. Main.
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Cotton dresses a specialty.
Ruff dry and wet washing. Also iron-
ing separately. Free pick-up arld de-
livery. Phone 2-9020.

RIDERS WANTED to Kallispell, Mont.
Leave about Aug. 11. Phone 7138.,
2 or 3 RIDERS WANTED-Driving to
Kansas City, Missouri. August 1 or 2.
References: exchange phone 2-3006 be-
tween 6 and 7 p.m.
WANTED TO RENT
DAILY EDITOR desires 3 or 4 room fur-
nished apartment, for fall semester.
Call 3-0697.

I

MICHIGAN
NOW SHOWING
"Flaming Youth~of the'20s'
~ ,p
Piper LAURIE
Rock HUDSON
AUN1ERSAt. Charles COBURN
ENTERNATIONA .
''CTUR" Gigi PERREAU
PLUS
I RONCO II
l ookB A DY
STE.. ; ,,
SUSTIEK

By The Associated Press
DETROIT -- The sixth-place
Philadelphia Athletics swept a
doubleheader with the last-place
Detroit Tigers yesterday taking
the second game, 3 to 2, after little
Bobby Shantz recorded his 19th
victory by a 2-1 margin in the
opener.
The A's rallied -with three runs
in the ninth inning to win the
nightcap. The twin victories gave
the Athletics a record of 15 games
won in the last 23 starts.
Shantz struck out seven and
walked only two in outpitching
young southpaw Billy Hoeft, who
gave all seven of the Athletics
hits in the eight innings he
worked. As it turned out all
three of the game's runs were
unearned.
Righthander Virgil Trucks had
the second game all sewed up go-
ing into the ninth inning, 2 to 0,
mainly on his first major league
home run in the sixth and Walt
Dropo's nineteenth in the seventh.
Up to that point Trucks had held
the A's to five hits and only two

of the runners had gotten as far
as third.
CUBS 11, GIANTS 8
NEW YORK-The Chicago
Cubs broke loose with a nine-run
seventh inning, aided by eight
hits and three New York errors,
to vanquish the Giants, 11-8
yesterday for their third victory
in the four-game series.
Paul Minner was shelled from
the mound in the eighth, after
yielding a grand slam homer to
rookie Jim Rhodes, but succeed-
ed in gaining his 10th victory in
his fifth attempt.
* * *
DODGERS 7-4, PIRATES 6-1
BROOKLYN-Brooklyn widened
its National League lead to six full
games yesterday by sweeping both
ends of a doubleheader from Pitts-
burgh, 7-6 in 11 innings and 4-1
behind Rookie Joe Landrum in the
second game. r
Landrum, just recalled from
Fort Worth where he was a 15-
game winner, kept eight hits well
scattered in his first major league
start. Bobby Morgan got him off to
a good start with a first-inning
homer.
The Brooks needed the breaks
to take the opener, winning
when relief man Paul LaPalme
walked George Shuba on four
straight balls to force home the
tie-breaking run in the 11th.
Trailing 6-0 in the econd inn-
ing, the Dodgers came back to tie
the score in the ninth with a
three-run rally off Cal Hogue and
Bob Friend.
Carl Furillo was carried off the
field after being hit by a pitch
thrown by Hogue in the first
game. He apparently escaped ser-
ious injury by protecting his head
with his left arm. He was not in
the starting lineup for the second
game.

RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T V
"Student Service"
1215 So. Univ., Ph. 7942
1% blocks east of East Engin.

0.

Collegiate Cuts
to please
7 BARBERS
NO WAITING
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

HELP WANTED
INTERVIEWERS for part time opinion
surveys. College background preferred,
not essential. Experience not neces-
sary. Answer fully. Box 18,

Read Daily

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By TED SMITS
HELSINKI--(P)-United States'
chances of overtaking Russia in
the battle for unofficial team hon-
ors in the Olympic Games dwind-
red yesterday as two American box-
ers were eliminated and American
swimmers found increasingly
tough competition from the Japa-
nese and Europeans.
The United States, however,
managed to pick up two points,
but the Soviets still lead, 523/ to
465, with three days of competi-
tion, left.
Only heavy American scoring in
swimming plus points in basket-
ball, boxing and eqtestrian events
can bring the United States out on
top.
* * * '
THE U.S.A. met Argentina, its
arch-rival in basketball from
South America, and won, 85 to 76.
The United States will now play
Russia for the championship to-
morrow. The Americans beat the
Soviets, 86 to 58, in an earlier
round of the tournament.
Joan Harrison of South Af-
frica won the only swimming
final of the day, the women's 100
meter backstroke, with Geertje
Wielema of Holland second, Joan
Stewart of New Zealand third,
Johanna De Korte of Holland
fourth, Barbara Stark of Orini-
da, Calif., fifth, and Gertrud
Herrbruck of Germany, sixth.
Miss Harrison's time was 1:14.3
The race was close all the way,
with Miss Harrison making an ex-
cellent turn and charging down
the home stretch to beat Miss
Wielema by a slender two tenths
of one second.
AMERICA'S 200-meter breast-
stroke men looked good in the pre-
liminaries. Each of the three came
home a heat winner after Ludevic
Komadel of Czechoslovakia had
lowered the Olympic record from
2:39.3 to 2.38.9, Gerald Holan, a
21-year-old Ohio State student,
pushed it down again, this time
to 2:36.8.
Herbert Klein, the world ree-
ord holder from Germany, won
his heat in 2:37, also under the
old record and Bowen Stass-
forth, an Iowa graduate, equal-
U.S. Water Polo
Team Wins Again
HELSINKI - tP) - A young
American team smashed Europe's
traditional domination of water
polo yesterday by fighting its way
into the final round of the Olym-
pic tournament and assuring the
U. S. of at least fourth place.
The U. S. beat Spain, 6-4, to
join Italy, Hungary and the win-
ner of tomorrow's Holland-Yugo-
slavia game in the final round of
four teams.
The American victory startled
Europe's water polo experts. It
was the fifth time in these Olym-
pics that the Americans have beat-
en a European team-which used
to be against all rules of form.

ARE YOU ELIGIBLE?
In Ann Arbor it's the
VFW CLUB
0 Dancing Fri. & Sat. Nights
" Two Fine Orchestras
* Mary Lou, Vocalist

VT*W*

DON BAILEY
Your Singing Host
HALL

led the Olympic mark. John
Davies of Australia, who attends
the University of Michigan, won
in 2:39.7 and Kenneth Kitzkow-
ski, the third American, won his
heat in 2:40.6.
Shiro Hashizume, another of Ja-
pan's great swimmers, set the pace
in the 1,500-meter or metric mile,
qualifying heats. He sped the dis-
tancy in 18:34. As compared to the
Olympic record of 19:12.4.
In heats for the women's 400-
meter free style, Evtlyn Kawa-
moto, from Honolulu and rep-
resenting - the United States,
made the fastest mark of all
and bettered the Olympic rec-
ord of 5:17.8. She was timed in
5:16.6.
In boxing, Nate Brooks of Cleve-
land and a welterweight from Gary
named Adkins advanced to the
semi-finals while David' Moore,
bantamweight from Springfield,
0. and Edson Brown, New York
City featherweight were elimi-
nated.

Writes Two
Track Books
Dedicates Work to
McEwen, Fonville
Michigan's track coach, Don
Canham, released a two-book ser-
ies on track and field events last
anonth and dedicated both volumes
to his two greatest champions.
Ironically, both men, Don Mc-
Ewen and Charlie Fonville, failed
to enter Olympic competition be-
cause 'of last minute physical ail-
ments.
McEwen, who was captain of
the 1952 track squad was In per-
fect shape throughout his col-
lege career, but developed stom-
ach trouble a few weeks before
the Canadian Olympic tryouts.
A back injury prevented Fon-
ville, who once held the world
shotput record, from competing
in the 1948 Olympics.
Canham's first volume dealing
with track and field is dedicated
to "Don Scott McEwen-A Cham-
pion and a Gentleman." His sec-
ond, dealing with field events is
"Dedicated to Charlie Fonville-
A World Record Holder Who Ac-
cepted Disappointment as Gra-,
ciously as He Did Fame and Suc-
cess."

,''

RENTLS BAPh. 2-3972
RENTALS & BANQUETS

Members
and Guests

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MiE ANRN AgRo CITYCOU1NCIL
I *- From 1he Ann Arbor Ns Mw , '2rIL

THE

ENDS TONIGHT
MARLENE ARTHUR MEL
DIETRICH-"KENNEDY-FERRER
- STARTS SATURDAY-- -
GINGER ROGERS- FRED ALLEN- VICIOR MOORE
MARILYN MONROE D9AVID lWAYNE EY[E ARDEN
PAUL DOUGLAS-[EDDIE RACKEN-Mull CAYNOR
LOUIS CALNERN- iSA SA GAROR
-- ADDED -
NOVELTY - NEWS
CARTOON

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH PRESENTS
"SECOND THRESHOLD"
PHILIP BARRY'S COMEDY
TONIGHT THRU SATURDAY
BOX OFFICE OPEN 10-8 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

SERVICE
AT IT'S BEST!
. . . Drive right thru for
WINE -BEER
SNACKS-SOFT DRINKS

L 11 uk

114 E. William St.
Between Main and
Founrth Ave.
PHONE 7191
Sundays Noon to 7 P.M.
OPEN
Daily 10 A.M. to 10 P.M.

REA
fSA)

, -!-. . - v .
y--
co cticism from CraCwho.
ciP resident Cecil . Crea
c preste tat such a propsa
lose again:' us for taxing au- W
A similar ee at in April by
thority wasmdefeat
- &a four-to tth la
." ___ Creal Plc at h lan
-- Creatlashed outs h Last
--an attemlpt "to fois so t urned
r¢ nattmpt_ cthat wastun- a Cii
onth ublic t"tbaud~~get off ic
do n the i. " H e said the b Cofi-
do e~l w e alanced for the chashballo
Is very r and that the cty
no earus to forta%-' payl
ng yea o ask" fr further is ad
noexcus. Wash. all a
"110w can you GOndemunsit here the
he asked, tax and tax exce
'- n ublicans andtxaedeDN
and tax'd' didn't se the ideax thisi
-- - Creal said he revenues for special Aug
cmeto Ag
of earmading ,,Itsto v(
'or a
p up se h schoolwfunctio nor n0
womI
plays
publi

HY DEFY THE
ILL OF THE VOTERS?
April, the people of Ann Arbor decisively voted down
ty Amusement tax. Defying the will of the voters, City
ials have again placed the measure on the August 5th
at, asking for a 10% tax on admissions. You already
20% Federal Tax on entertainment. If this new tax
dopted, the people of Ann Arbor will pay a 30% tax on
amusements. We do not believe there is another city in
United States which penalizes it's citizens with such
ssive taxation.
l'T BE LED to believe that visitors to the city will pay
tax. That is only a subterfuge, as was placing it on the
ust 5th ballot when students are off Campus and unable
ote and when other University personnel are on vacation,
way for the summer. THE TRUTH IS that every man,
an and child in Ann Arbor who attends motion pictures,
s, dances, athletic events, musical programs and other
ic events where an admission of 26c and over is charged
L PAY THIS TAX,

GOOD NEWS FOR TEACHERS
AND OTHER
SCHOOL
EMPLOYEES
ABOUT
AUTO INSURANCE
You can now insure in a company that issues a policy designed
especially for school people. In fact, it is a polciy restricted exclus-
ively to this class of car owners (and their husbands or wives).
It offers you not only all of the common forms of automobile insur-
ance coverage but also many others, such as "member-collision"
coverage, no matter who is to blame-liability coverage when driv-
ing other cars-and up to $5.00 a day for transportation if your
car is stolen.
Find out about the many other benefits that our school-employee
insurance offers you before you renew your present policy. Write
or phone:
MICHIGAN EDUCATIONAL EMPLOYEES
MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY
906 Hammond Bldg Detroit 26, Mich.
Woodward 2-6988... Woodward2-2574

Chteif ut
TONIGHT
DOORS OPEN 5:45 P.M.
FEATURE SHOWN 3 TIMES NIGHTLY
FIRST FFATURE AT
6:00 P.M.
CONTINUOUS SHOWING
SECOND SHOW-7:15; LAST SHOW-9:30
(See Schedule Below)
FREDRIC VERONICA ROBERT SUSAN
MARCH LAKE BENCHLEY. HAYWARD
in
RENE CLAIR'S
"I MARRIED
A WITCH"
A United Artists Picture
Based on Thorne Smith's "The Passionate Witch"
"A HIGH BOUNCE above the usual run of cinematic whimseys ...
more oh-boy than occult, but its humor is Clair enough."
--N.Y. TIMES
ALSO
THE STORY OF THE HURRIED,FHARRIED,
PALLID CREATURE OF
Music by t CITY" Commentary by
COPLAND 1TH CTMUMFORD
The Documentary Film Classic
"HILARIOUSLY IRONIC ... and steadily gripping ... cannot be
praised too hig hly"-STAGE Magazine.

ONLY YOU - BY YOUR VOTE
CAN STOP THIS NEW TAX GRAB!

An Estimate Returned
Upon Receipt of Coupon

.

UIATF UI'

A t~L A DED-V

IA 7

I (COUPON)I

- - 3

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