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June 27, 1951 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-06-27

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 1951

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;TH E CH AMP IS WORRIED:
PGA Meet Opens Today at Gakmont

'Athletes in Nation ciSp ihti aaft
C a inmin*Fitt,

"r

OAVMONT, Pa.-(/P)--The ex-
hausting week-long Professional
Golfers Association tournament
opens today with defending cham-f
pion Chandler Harper in a state
of complete depression over a pro-
longed slump.
- 'ECOME TO

"I can't do anything right," the
balding, 37-year-old pro from
Portsmouth, Va., said upon check-
ing in today. "If I can't iron my-
self out this week I'll probably
give up tournament golf altogeth-
er.
HARPER, SURPRISE winner at
Columbus' Scioto Club a year ago,
said he will seek the low medal
in 36-hole qualifying tomorrow
and Thursday and will defend hisR
crown in match play beginning
Friday.
"I don't know how I'll do,"
the Virginian said dejectedly.
"If it's no better than I've done
so far this year, it'll be terrible."

pros-is being waged over the
saw - toothed Oakmont Country
Club course, 6,882 yards of grind-
ing sand traps and spacious light-I
ning greens.
IT'S RATED one of the tough-
est 'layouts in the world. Its par
37-35-72 has n o t been broken
over the 72-hole route in two Op-
en championships here since 1927.
As champion, Harper qualifies
automatically. But he is permitted
to seek the $250 extra given for
the low medal. This he will do.I
The first 18-hole round of qual-
ifying for the 140 entrants begins
at 6:30 a.m. (CST) today. The low

Bob Olson, leading golfer o n Don McEwen, the chugging dis-
this spring's Michigan team, tanceman from Ottawa, won the
reached the semi-finals of the NCAA two mile (rown for the sec-
Western Amateur before losing to ond year in a row, touring the
Frank Stranahan, the eventual distance in 9:03.2 at Seattle. The
winner, last week. Wolverine team finished fifteenth
Olson, who took third in the in the meet.
Western Conference champion- 4 * *
ships in May, played sub-par golf
against the wealthy, strong-arm- ticErEN, A DOUBLE winner in
ed Stranahan, but was defeated, this spring's Big Ten meet, was
3 and 2, in their 36-hole semi-final relected captain of the 1951-52
match. A rack team at the close of the
spring semester.
THE DETROIT swinger had Michigan's baseball team, un-
rounds of 70 and 68 for the day, successful in 1951 season play,
but Stranahan was hot, and two nevertheless produced a possible
birdies in a row on the final holes star for the professional game in
spelled defeat for Olson. The Wol- Al Weygandt, hard - hitting first
verine star had defeated Jimmy baseman.
McHale, another big name in Weygandt, who batted .350 in
amateur golf, in the quarterfinal conference play, was put under
round. contract by the New York Yankees,
On other fronts, Michigan and will ply with Binghampton
athletes fared nearly as well. of the Eastern League.

We specialize in
e SHORT CUTS
* PERSONALITY STYLES
For your comfort
" FAN COOLED SHOP
* NO WAITING
*@7 HAIR STYLISTS
The ;scola Barbers
Liberty off State

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64 will vie in the match play
This 33rd championship of the I championship beginning Fiiday,,
nation's links professors-the har- I with 36 holes scheduled each day
dened campaigners and the club through Tuesday's finals.

DON McEWEN
. still the champ

AL WEYGANDT
... with Yankees now

............ m

11

Bargains in USED
or ntew books yopr

Full Intramural Sports Slat

Offered Louis Vetos
individually. They will be assibnedlo
teams.

*

*

"Every Book for Every Course

or the r tierY

.Se .ss./

**

*

Leagues To Open
Play Next Week
For the sports-minded summer
session student, Michigan's Intra-
mural Department will present an
eleven-event program during the
next eight weeks.
The summer program, directed
by Rod Grambeau, includes leagu-
es in basketball, softball, and vol-
leyball. Individual tournaments on
the slate are badminton, horse-
shoes, handball, paddleball, ten-
nis singles and doubles, and golf
(match and medal play.)
IN ADDITION, informal sports
are available to students at the'
Deadline for entries in this
summer's intramural softball
leagues is Saturday, June 30.
I n t e r e s t e d individuals and
teams should contact the I-M
office by that time.
-Don Robinson
I-M building, Hoover and South.
State Streets; the University golf
course on Stadium Hills, and in
the Ferry Field area, where ten-
nis courts are available.
The Sports Building proper
will be open Monday through
Friday from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
The popular co-recreational
program, in which both men and
women students may use the
building's facilities, will be sche-
duled from 7:30 to 10 p.m. every
Friday night. (The first pro-
gram will be this Friday and the
last August 10th.)
Michigan's golf coach, Bert
Katzenmeyer, will handle entries
and scheduling in three events-

golf, basketball and volleyball.
Entries for the summer golf cham-
pionshipsmshould be in his hands
at the course by July 5th. The first
round matches will start July 7th.
Anyone interested in softball
and basketball officiating dur-
ing the summer contact the I-
M office as soon as possible
(phone 8109.)
--Ed Olds
In addition, faculty entries for a
nine-hole match play tournament
will close July 5th.
TEAM ENTRIES in basketball
and volleyball will be accepted at
the Sports Building until July 5th.
Interested men may also sign up

Softball, one of the more po-
pular summer sports, will begin
next week, according to Don Ro-
binson, who will coordinate the
several prospective leagues in
this activity. Entries for the
sport close this Saturday, June
30th.
In tennis, paddleball, handball,
horseshoes, badminton and squash,
entries close at 6 p.m. on July 2nd.
Entries may be made by phone
(8109) or at the Sports Building.
Eminently successful last sum-
mer, the sports program affords
brain-weary students a chance to
exercise other muscles than those
in the head, while giving them
well-run group activities.

-I-

Buy al

. . .

American Women Win Easily
In Wimbledon Tennis Matches
WIMBLEDON - (P) - A chill the second set of her secon
rain beat down on Wimbledon for round match against Pat Ward
hours today as players fretted and Britain, but she collected hers
fans huddled together for warmth again to pull out the victoryk
in the stands, but the clouds part- 6-0. 6-4.
ed late in the day and America's The only other American s
phalanx of women tennis stars to drop a set was seventh seed
raced through their opening Nancy Chaffee of Ventura, Cal
matches in an unbroken stream rceivedfa f et cl
before nightfall. who received a. first set shock b
bfore she rallied to eliminate M
The audience, finally rewarded Joey Lloyd, a soft-stroking En
for its long vigil under the drip- ( lish player, 4-6, 6-2, 6-3.
ping stands, saw why the first The other American winne
seven seeded women in the cham- who raced through their match
pionship are all from the U.S., as though they wanted to get:
and they remained to marvel at out of the damp, were Lou
the "big" game of Althea Gibson Brough of Beverly Hills, the d
of New York City, the first fending champion; Mrs. Margar
American Negro ever invited to Osborne Dupont of Wilmingto
play in the All-England classic. Del., The U. S. titleholder; Do
Althea, playing on the famed Hart of Miami, Fla.; Beverly B
center court before perhaps the ker of Santa Monica, Calif.; Sh
most critical tennis audience in ley Fry of Akron, O., and u
the world, appeared to suffer a seeded Betty Rosenquest of Sou
delayed case of nerves as she lost Orange, N. J.

d-
of
elf
by
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be-
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gl-
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hes
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ise
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th

'In. Germany
NEW YORK-(P)-The Sunday
night bottle throwing incident
cost Berlin boxing fans a chance
to see Joe Louis in action this
August.
Burned up at the treatment ac-
corded middleweight champion
Ray Robinson, the Brown Bomb-
er today called off a ten round
bout with German's Hein Ten
Hoff in Berlin Aug. 8.
"We're not going to fight over
there," said Marshall Miles, man-
ager of Louis.
"We had virtually settled on
the financial terms with pro-
moter Fred Kirsch for a bout
with Ten Hoff but now it's off.
Kirsch cabled me Friday and
was to have contacted me yes-
terday but he didn't. I guess he's
been too busy in Berlin because
of what happened."
"We not only were disappointed,
at the action of the crowd there,"k
said Miles, "But very much amaz-
ed at the way the referee handled
the fight."
* * *
KIRSCH, whe promoted the Ro-
binson-Gerhardt Hecht fight in
Berlin Sunday, had guaranteed
Louis $25,000, or the privilege of
35 percent of the gate, plus trans-
portation and expenses for four
persons.
In the Berlin incident, spec-
tators hurled bottles and other
missiles into the ring in the sec-
ond round after the referee dis-
qualified Robinson for allegedly
using illegal kidney punches.
The West Berlin Boxing Commis-
sion later reversed the verdict
and ruled it a "no decision" af-
fair.
Asked yesterday in Frankfurt
whether he would advise Louis
not to appear in Berlin, Robinson
said:
"No, but I will warn him of the'
way they call kidney punch rules
over here and advise him to make
sure everybody understands the
rules in advance."
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Get 14 Hits
Marrero Sills
New York Bats
BY The Associated Press
CHICAGO - The pace-setting
Chicago White Sox swept into a
two game lead in the American
League last night by lambasting
the Detroit Tigers, 11-3, before
47,120 as Washington defeated
the New York Yankees in the na-
tion's capital.
Luis Aloma was the winning
pitcher in relief for Chicago. He
came in for starter Randy Gum-
pert in the fifth. Bob Cain, De-
troit's 1951tworkhorse, was the
victim of the 14-hit White Sox
barrage. George Kell and Vic
Wertz hit home runs for the De-
troit club.
CONRAD MARRERO held the
Yankees to eight hits-four of
shich came in the first inning-
s Washington blasted three New
York pitchers for 14 hits and a
7-3 victory. Ed Lopat, a 10-game
winner, lost his third decision.
Third baseman Eddie Yost led
the Washington attack with four
hits in four times at bat. Mar.
rero, the Cuban with the noth-
ing ball, now has a 7-4 record
for the season. The Yankees
thus failed to gain ground on
the league-leading White Sox.
Luke Easter belted a home run
in the 11th inning last night to
give the Cleveland Indians a 6-4
win over the St. Louis Browns;
who smacked three homers off
Bob Feller's pitching.
STEVE GROMEK, who relieved
in the eleventh, was the winning
pitcher. Al Rosen also belted a
home run for the Indians. Lollar,
Marsh and Wood were the big
batsmen for the Browns, each
gathering circuit blows.
Boston's Red Sox unloaded
four home runs as they walloped
the Philadelphia Athletics 13-5
before a crowd of 18,979. Vern
Stephens clouted two, Clyde
Vollmer and Bob Doerr one each
for the winners. Eddie Joost
knocked in three A's runs with
his tenth four bagger of the
season.
The Sox rattled three Phila-
delphia pitchers for a dozen hits
while Boston lefthander Mel Par-
nell allowed only eight in winning
his ninth game of the season. Par-
nell has lost four decisions.
* * *
ALTHOUGH he failed, to get
into the home run act Ted Wil-
liams was the leading run pro-
ducer as he drove across four of
the Sox runs on a triple off the
center field wall and a pair of
singles.
Stephens accounted for three
runs with his two homers, his 12th
and 13th of the season, into the
left field nets.
Doerr's ninth four bagger of the
season drove in three runs in the
third inning. Vollmer's homer was
his fifth and Boston's otker two
runs were chased home on a Dom
DiMaggio single.
Parnell scattered eight hits fair-
ly well and his closest approach
to trouble was in the sixth when
he walked Lou Klein and Johnny
Kucab and then Joost blasted his
homer into the left field nets.

:

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imam

CH GIrA V C
' i 'L? ' .3 g M M1. ' 119 h M +:F=9

322 South State Street

Bob Graham, Mgr.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

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BREAKFAST . 7:30-10:00
LUNCH . * . 11:00-1:30
DINNER . . . 5:00-7:00
MEAL MART CAFETERIA
338 Maynard - thru the Arcade

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