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June 27, 1951 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-06-27

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

WENSA, UE2, 91TE IcI;A -L

Social, Recreational Events

Open

to

Campus

Varied After-Class ciies
Scheduled by League Council
Dances To Be Staged in Rumpus Room:
Bridge Lessons To Be Given Tuesdays

Women's Athletic Department
Plans Full Sports Program
Coeds Ilave Many Facilities Open to Them
At WAB i-M. Union for Co-Recreation

SchoolSlates
Party Tonight
Bowling, tennis, golf and square
dancing are among the entertain-
ment planned for School of Edu-
cation party at the Women's Ath-
letic Building tonight.
Students and faculty have been
invited to attend the event which
will include sports, dancing, cards
and refreshments. The party will
be held from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.

WELCOME
Ladies' and Children's
HAIR-STYLING
A SPECIALTY
Five courteous experienced
hair stylists to please you.
o appointments necessary.
The Daseola Barbers
Liberty off State
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Winter or summer, the Wom-
en's League, coed mecca for many
student generations, is one of the
busiest places on campus.
The summer League council has
planned a program which includes
an activity for- nearly every eve-
ning in the week and will con-
tinue to sponsor all-campus events
during the summer.
* * *
A BEGINNING - of - the - week
"slump" will be taken care of
with some spirited square dances
from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Mondays in
the League Ballroom. Lessons on
the art of "do-si-doing" and
"promenading the hall" will be
i conducted by Mrs. Valerie Moffett.
A fee of $1.50 for five lessons and
40 cents for each individual les-
son will be charged.
"Seven no trump" and "I
pass" will be heard at the
League on, Tuesday evenings.
Bridge lessons, under the dir-
ection of Mrs. C. P. Ervin, will
be given at 7 p.m. each week. A
fee of $3 will be charged for six
lessons.
Students who would like to
brush up on their ballroom danc-
ing techniques this summer will
welcome the dance classes which
will be held each Wednesday, be-
ginning tonight

MR. EDWARD FUSCO, an Ar-
thur Murray dance instructor will
conduct beginner classes at 7 p.m.
and intermediate classes at 8 p.m.
in the League Ballroom. Coeds
are admitted free of charge and
men will pay a fee of $2.50 for
six lessons.
Duplicate bridge is slated forI
Thursday nights at the League.
The "Rumpus Room" of the
League will be the scene of in-
formal record dances each Friday
evening this summer. Admission
is free to all students, who may
attend with or without dates.
THE DANCES will be held
from 9 p.m. to midnight in the1
basement of the League. Televi-
sion will also be available for
those who are interested during
the week.
Additional informationand tick-
ets for the activities may be ob-
tained in the Undergraduate Of-.
fice of the League.
The League summer council in-
cludes Ginny Gish, president;
Corienne Bacon, judiciary chair-
man; Jean Martin and Marilyn
Kollenberg, judiciary members;
Dorothy nPrettie, dance class
chairman; Jeah Freshour, Round-
up Room chairman; Ann Houch,
social chairman and Marcia Gold-
farb, publicity chairman.

w ,
GERMAN DESIGN-Telescope
glasses exhibited at Universal
German Industry Fair in Han-
over, can be adjusted to fit any
eyesight. They fold together
like any glasses.

TOUR TOGS-Nancy Chaffee,
of Los Angeles, women's na-
tional indoor champion, shows
a white pique ensemble, one of
several she will wear gin Euro-
pean tourneys.

TOURED WEST COAST:
Visiting Instructor To leach
Modern Dance This Summer

Afternoon lullnesses and empty
July and August evenings need not
discourage the active summer
school student, for the women's
physical education department has
provided many opportunities for
summertime fun around campus.
A variety of sport programs has
been planned in which both men
and women may participate and,
upon student requests, the pro-
grams can be expanded to include
many sports which have not been
organized.
i*
CO-RECREATIONAL meetings
have already been organized for
badminton and modern dance.
Both men and women who are in-
terested in swinging at a few bird-
ies can go to Barbour Gym at 7:30
p.m. Wednesdays. Information can
be obtained at Barbour concerning
the modern dance recreational
program.
Volleyball, basketball, swim-
ming) trampoline, paddleball,
ping pong and horseshoes are
among the sports which will be
offered on co-recreational night
every Friday at the Intramural
Building.
Coeds will find the Union pool
available to them for swimming
from 8:15 to 10:15 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursday evenings.
* * *
ALL KINDS OF equipment and
facilities are available at the Wo-
men's Athletic Building to campus
sport enthusiasts who may have
left their tennis racquets and golf
clubs at home this summer.
-r At

Miss Shirley Wimmer, visiting
supervisor of dance at the Uni-
versity this summer, will direct
the modern dance classes in the
Department of Physical Education

UF-

and will also direct much of the
Play Production dance work.
She was chaurman of the dance
department at Mills College in
Oakland, California and taught
at Connecticut College, New York
University and Columbia Univer-
sity. She has also had extensive
dancing experience on Broadway
and has toured the west coast with
her own concert group.
Miss Wimmer said that she "will
gear the modern dance classes to
the students' needs." She plans to
do both technique and composi-
tion work in her classes.

I~

Tennis courts, putting greens,
and fields for softball, archery,
soccer and other sports are open
to students who prefer the great
outdoors following a morning of
classes and studying.
All the necessary utensils and
equipment tobe used on a picnic
can also be rented for a small fee
from WAB.
COURSES IN elementary and
intermediate golf, tennis, modern
dance and swimming are being giv-
en as well as instruction in archery
and posture, figure and carriage.
Most of these classes, which are
being conducted for both recrea-
tional enjoyment and instruction,
are open to men and women.
The classes will be small and
will be designed to fit individual
needs and desires, said Miss Mar-
ie Hartwig.
Students may register for sports
instruction this week in Office 15
at Barbour Gymnasium. A health
permit, which may be obtained at
Health Service, is required for par-
ticipation.
Students are urged by the phy-
sical education department to take
advantage of the recreational fa-
cilities which are available to them
this summer.
They are also prompted to re-
quest for any sport instruction or
recreational program which they
1would like to see organized.
Clerical Work
Takes Honors
With Women
There are now more women
stenographers, typists and other
office workers in America than
there are women in any other oc-
cupation, statistics have proven.
In the last eighty years, ac-
cording to government figures,
the number of women in these
clerical jobs has risen from a few
thousand to over four million.
The women who work in offices
in the United States now receive
a considerable part of all income
earned by women, the government
reports, and account for much of
the saving and spending which
women do.
Their average income during a
recent year was approximately
$2,000 a year, even when the in-
comes of part-time workers were
included and the incomes of wom-
en who worked only a, few weeks
or a few months during the year.
Studies made by a life insur-
ance association have revealed
that more than a quarter of all
the insurance which women buy
is bought by clerical workers.
A third is bought by business
and professional women, by stu-
dents, by self-employed women
and by women working in other
kinds of jobs.

Pictured--
broadcloth in
white-pink-ye
black-navy
Other styles
in pique
and linen.
Colors in plaid
and pastels.

I

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SumBer Cotto
BLOUSES

I

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t.

s2Pac.

1!

-B- r W ' Ar* _

Jo tihe#r* stime...

oLANCEITSi
1111 South University

From our collection
OF PAT HARTLY
COTTONS
10.95
This breezy woven plaid and dot
gingham is but one of a collection
of cool tissue cottons ... newsy
in every detail and as washable as
they are fresh and new.
This is a very special value, right
when you'll be wanting these
cottons. Style shown, in red, green,
blue or brown; sizes 9 to 1 5.
JR. CORNER

SUMMER
SPECIALS
DRESSES
A marvelous selection of gingham, voile,
chambray, pique and linen. Sizes 9 to 15

'b:tyi

Read and Use

'

and 10 to 18.

Daily Classifieds

8.95 and 595

f

or class
nor
palivantin'
round
:ampus
fr"m

SKIRTS

Popular denims at 3.95. Cottons in prints
and solid colors at only 5.95. Sizes 9 to

"m"

15 and 10 to 18.

3.95 and 595

Sun-Backs
1-Piece
2-Piece
* GINGHAM
* CHAMBRAY
* VOILE
* DIMITY
* L INEN

BLOUSES
You'll want several at these savings!
Peasant style, sleeveless, and tailored shirts.
White or pastels. Sizes 30 to 38.

295

KNITTED 2-PIECE DRESSES

Perfect for vacation wear! 100% wool,
nylon, or cotton. Pastels and navy.
Sizes 10 to 20. Values to 22.95.

1200

Ix-

I

U

I I I

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