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June 27, 1951 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-06-27

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 1951

L -

'U' Religious Association
Welcomes Students Today

d _..._

The Student Religious Associa-
tion will open the doors of Lane
Hall at 12:15 p.m. today to wel-
come students to the first lunch-
Jurisdictional
Dispute Settled
A jurisdictional labor dispute be-
tween two AFL unions which has
delayed progress on the new South
Quadrangle men's dormitory since
early April has finally been set-
tled.
Local AFL carpenters had pro-
tested the installation of assem-
bled wardrobe and desk units into
the new structure, contending that
a clause in their constitution pro-
hibits installing wood products not
made by members of the carpen-
ter's brotherhood.
The assembled desks and ward-
robes had been made by members
of another AFL union, not of the
same brotherhood.
The problem has been solved by
having the firm that made the
units install them in the new
dormitory.

eon-discussion of the summer ses-
sion.
Mr. DeWitt C. Baldwin, director
of the Association, will be the
speaker, and succeeding Wednes-
days will be devoted to compara-
tive discussions on religion. The
luncheons cost 40 cents and are
open to everyone.
* * *
NEXT ON THE list of weekly
scheduled events will be the coffee-
hour from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Fri-
day which will honor the foreign
students on campus.
From 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Sat-
urday the first of three Interna-
tional Outings will be held at
Silver Lake.
The cost for the day, which will
include a short religious disccs-
sion group, will be $1.50. This will
cover transportation and the pic-
nic lunch
The traditional Lane Hall open-
air square dances will be held from
7 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Tuesdays in
the Lane Hall parking lot. These
are open to the public free of
charge.
The ping-pong, library and mu-
sic room facilities in Lane Hall
will be available to students from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day.

Jones Accepts TO THE VICTORS:
~U' Education Give H o
Professorship To Stude
Howard It. Jones, president of-
Plymouth Teachers College, Ply- Student and faculty men
mouth, N. H., has been appointed ored during the past few wee
professor of school administration and honorary degrees.
in the education school.
The forty-year-old University of Dean James B. Edmonso
Minnesota graduate received his honorary doctor of science inE
PhD from Yale University in 1940 versity commencement exerci
after four years of teaching in a Prof. Walter H. C. Lave
Minnesota secondary school. He
was a teaching assistant for two UNESCO and visiting profess
years at Yale and served on the the executive board of the I
research staff of the Connecticut stitute in Germany. The app
Department of Education for a lished by UNESCO was anno
year previous to earning his doc- Prof. Laves attended the
torate.
From 1940 to 1943, Prof. Jones1
was on the University of New International
Hampshire faculty, holding the
post of assistant dean of the liter-
ary college for two years. He was Center Plans
superintendent of schools a n d
principal of the high school at New
Cahaan, Conn. for three years be- tudentshh
fore assuming the Plymouth Col-
lege presidency in 1946. The International Center
highlight its summer plans
U' Official s a group of tours to acquaint
eign students with places of
Given Auterest within reach of Ann A
The tours, which accommo
20 people, will vary in price
President Alexander G. Ruthven will usually cost about $2.00.Z
and Provost James P. Adams, both ets will be sold in advance.
retiring from their posts this sum-
mer, haye been presented with au-
tomobiles by friends and faculty PLACES WHICH will be vi
associates. are: Southern Michigan Pris
President Ruthven will officially Jackson, Friday, July 13; K
retire on Sun., Sept. 1, when Har- Frazer Plant, Friday, July 20;
lan Hatcher will become president logg Food Plant in Battle C
of the University. Provost Adams Friday, July 28; Detroit Inst
wlli leave his post Saturday. of Art, Friday, August 3; G
President and Mrs. Ruthven are field Village, Friday, August
currently spending a two-week va- the Ford Motor Plant, Fr
cation at their summer home in August 17.
Frankfurt, Mich. A tour to Niagara Falls
Honors also went to ninety-one be arranged for July 6-
non-academic University employ- enough people are interested,
ees, who were presented with serv- cording to the ActivitiesOf,
ice awards by the University last of the Center.
week.

iors Awards
nts Faculty
mbers of the University have been hon-
eks with a flurry of scholarships, awardss
on of the education school was given anE
education degree during the Wayne Uni-
ses, June 14.
es, former deputy director general ofj
sor of political science, was appointed to
nternational Social Science Research In-
pointment to the board which was estab-
unced June 13.
founding of the institute in Wiesbaden,
Germany, June 16 through 19.
* * *

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIEDADVERTISI NG
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M Saturdays

I k*C I I 'ti J 6y Y v ACML
u - Lzoo

PERSONAL
ANYONE HAVING INFORMATION con-
cerning Dr. Fu Manchu please call Cy
Carlton or George Flint, 2-1417 or
2-3241. Anonymity will be preserved.
)55P
TRANSPORTATION
COMMUTERS WANTED-Driving daily
to Anno-Arbor. Call)evenings in De-
trot O543.)5

i-

11

s
will
with
for-
f in-
rbor.
odate
, but
Tick-
Isited
on at
aiser
Kel-
reek,
itute
,reen-
t 10;
iday,
may
8 if
ac-
fice

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4
I

DEAN ALBERT C. Furstenberg
of the Medical School was awarded
an honorary Doctor of Laws degree
by Hahnemann Medical College,
Philadelphia, June 14. He deliv-
ered the major address during the
school's 104th commencement
ceremonies.
Arthur L. Brandon, University
relations counselor was elected
to the Board of Trustees of
Bucknell University. A former
member of the Bucknell faculty
and administration, he was se-
lected by alumni ballot to serve
as a trustee for five years.

111.30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
_ _FOR SALE_
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER-Smith-Cor-
ona with foreign language keyboard.
Very reasonable, perfect condition.
Phone 2-6753. ()141
GIRLS RALEIGH BICYCLE-Excellentt
condition, 3-speed, hand-brakes, car-
rier, stand, lock, all ready for school.
Ph. 3-0275. )140
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOM in graduate house for girls. I
Phone 2-6753. )79R
SHARE APARTMENT with Grad Stu-
dent. Save on meals. $8 week. Big
yard, continuous hot water. Call
31791. )80R
WASHTENAW AREA - Pleasant single
room with private lavatory and toilet.
Gentlemen preferred. 2-3868. )77R
LARGE, CLEAN DOUBLE ROOM for two
men. Faculty member's home. 716 N.
Fifth Ave. 2-1225. )78R
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD AT FRATERNITY HOUSE
Washtenaw at South University. Call
Jack Lawrence, 2-5644. )2X
BOARD AT FRATERNITY HOUSE -
Short block from Law Quad, corner
Hill and Oakland. Eating schedule at
your convenience. Really good food.
Ph. 2-1634. ) 3X

WANTED-Riders, E. Dearborn to Ann
Arbor. Has 8 a.. classes. Contact
Mich. Daily Box 10. )34T
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Advanced student of German
to read German II for blind student,
2-2217. })55H
WOMAN STUDENT with light schedule
to assist in household in exchange for
room and board. Small wage offered
for additional time. 2-7255. }54H

HELP WANTED
READERS WANTED-Stat. or Math ma-
jors. 85c an hour. Call 7463 between
7 and 10 p. )56H
BUSINESS SERVICES
MEN TO EAT at fraternity house, break.
fast, lunch and dinner, or any com.
bination. Two blocks from East Quad.
Phone 2-8312. 1319 Cambridge. )27B
THE STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
olers special Student-Faculty rates
to TIME, LIFE and other magazines.
Phone 2-8242, )28B
SINGING AND SPEECH DEVELOPMEP4T
-Dr. Kenneth N. Westerman, mem.
ber of the Research Committee of the
National Association of Teachers of
Singing. Studio 303 S. State. Phone
6584. )29B
MISCELLANEOUS
AT LIBERTY-German 11 and 12 in-
structor does tutoring and translation.
A. R. Neumann, 2-7909. )14M~

The PPd Restaurant
GOOD FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
*I
Open Daily - 7 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.
CLOSED SUNDAYS
e sell for less!
338 SOUTH STATE STREET

11;

f1

V

University of Michigan Union
The MAIN DINING ROOM
Serving Breakfast 7:30-9:30 A.M,
Luncheon 12:00-1 :30 P.M.
Dinner 6:00-7:30 P.M.
Monday through Saturday . . . CLOSED SUNDAYS
The CAFETERIA -Open 7 A.M.-7:30 P.M.
Serving Breakfast 7:00-10:00 A.M.
Luncheon 1 1 :00 A.M.-1 :45 P.M.
Dinner 5:00-7:30 P.M.-
The Cafeteria will be open to the ladies on Sundays only during
the period from July 1 to August 19.
Escorted ladies welcome 2:30-5:00 P.M. daily.
THE SODA BAR-12:00 Noon to 10:00 P.M.
THE BILLIARD ROOM-12:00 Noon to 9:00 P.M. CLOSED SUNDAYS
THE BAABER SHOP--8:30 A.M. to 5:15 P.M.
SWIMMING POOL 11:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. Daily Except Tuesday &
Thursday 11 :00 A.M. to 7:00 P.M.
A complete line of periodicals, smoking needs, and candies are
available at the Main Desk in the Lobby.
Guest facilities for overnight guests of members.

A second feature of the program
planned is the continuation of the
International Radio Roundtable,
which recently won an award for
furthering international under-
standing. The program is a discus-
sion by American and foreign stu-
dents of the customs of America
and of problems of international
understanding.
The International Center's tra-
ditional teas will be from 4:30 p.m.
to 6 p.m. Thursdays during the
summer session, and will be open
to all interested students.
Special Summer Policy
44c until 6:30 P.M.
Monday Through Friday
t or16 t6;hoks!

Eight more graduate students!
wer awarded Fulbright scholar-
ships for foreign study on June 22,
according to Dean Ralph A. Saw-
yer of the Graduate School. The
awards, made by the Department
of State, will provide for study
abroad during the academic year
1951-52.
T h e students receiving t h e
awards are Philip D. Appleman,
2002 Dodge Ave., Fort Wayne;
Richard Albert Scott, R. R. 4, La-
grange, Mich.; Mary Bakst, 2633
Tuxedo St., Detroit; Robert O.
Belched, 508 Emmet, Ypsilanti;
Harvey S. Gross, 632 Church St.,
Ann Arbor; Gordon H. Jones, 899
W. Bethune, Detroit; Byron J.
Koekkoek, Route 1, Jenison, Mich.;
Donald R. Matheson, 1814 Hiawa-
tha Place, Ann Arbor.
Don E. Francke, chief pharma-
cist of University Hospital, was
awarded an honorary Doctor of
Science degree June 10 by Purdue
University. . The presentation
was made by Purdue President
Frederick L. Hovde at the school's
93rd commencement exercises.
* * *
TWO FELLOWSHIPS for post-
doctoral studies were awarded
June 21 by the Executive Board of
the Graduate School to Lawrence
S. Bartell, 1919 Scottwood Ave.,
Ann Arbor, and Henry A. Imshaug,
1406 Dell Court, Willow Run.
Two $1,000 awards have been
made to architecture students, ac-
cording to Dean Wells I. Bennett,
of the architecture college. Mat-
thias R. Goebel, 828 Yout St., Ra-
cine, was awarded the George G.
Booth Traveling Fellowship in Ar-
chitecture for 1951 on June 6.
On June 13 the Harley, Ellington
and Day Scholarship for a junior
student showing "marked ability
and promise" was given to Tivadar
Balogh, 14500 Mark Twain, De-
troit.
Honor awards in economics at
the University have been pre-
Isented to a senior student and
two June graduates, Prof. I. L.
Sharfman, chairman of the eco-
nomics department announced
yesterday.
Joan H. Silvers, 29 Hoskier
Road, South Orange, N. J. was
awarded the Sims Senior Honor
Scholarship in Economics for the
year 1951-52. By winning the
award Miss Silvers claimed the
title of the "most outstanding and
promising senior student in eco-
nomics."
The two outstanding graduating
seniors given awards were Carl A.
Pohly, 1326 Broadway, Flint, and
Lawrence B. Krause, 1214 Tewkes-
bury Place, N. W., Washington, D.
C., who both received the Harold
D. Osterwell Prize in Economics.

U

I F Y O U W R I T E W E H A V E I T

MEMSF?,ERscH00
ORSg BOOK PAP
TYPEW R ITERS
BOUGHT, SOLD, RENTED,
OR REPAIRED
WEBSTER-CHICAGO WIRE RECORDERS
FOR RENT OR FOR SALE

RENT
atypewriter
and keep up
with your work

Portables
Standard Office Machines
Wide Carriage Machines
Special Rates to
Summer Students

I

Fountain Pens
Repaired by a Factory .
Trained Man.

I

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Since
1908

G.I. Requisitions accepted for supplies only
314 South State Street
THE TYPEWRITER AND STATIONERY STORE

Phone
7177

'

I

16

e Deafrtment Speech
. presents Its
:.0
SUMMER SEASON'" OF P AY'S
July 4-7
_ "Green Grow the Lilacs"
byLYNN RIGGS
4 July 11-14 July 25-28
a- "An Enemy of the People" July,2CH2TED
by HENRIK IBSEN "TlE ENCHANTED"
adapted by Arthur Miller by JEAN GIRAUDOUX
July 18-21
Auut1-4t-;
The Younge Ireland A4
Theatre Company "The Streets of New York"
Sponsored by by DION BOUCICAULT
International Theatre Exchange .I
August 9-13
AN OPERA
o (to be announced)

Tired of Han burgers?.

b

,aJOAN DAVIS
Cartoon - News - Oddities

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

--

j

"

Continuous Daily from 1 P.M.

44c
to
6:30 P.M.

STEAKS TILL MIDNITE
HO EMADE POTATO SALAD
BARBEQUED BEEF SANDWICHES
a the

LAST TIMES TODAY
DANA ANDREA'S "SEALED CARGO"
Starts Thursday

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