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July 06, 1951 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-07-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MPM

FRIDAY, JULY 6, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. ., .. . .

Plenty of Recreation Available
To Amuse Summer Students
League, Nearby Parks, Beaches Provide
Varied Entertainment To Fill Leisure Time

In the Good 01' Summertime

Contrary to popular opinion,
summer school is not a continuous
circle of textbooks, air-condition-
ed movies and solitaire.
With a little ingenuity and in-
quiry, plenty of entertainment
and recreation can be found to
take care of those lazy afternoon
and empty evening hours.
SUMMER IS practically a syn-
onym for swimming, and there
are many lakes within easy driv-
ing or hard hoofing distance from
Ann Arbor.
Silver Lake has been one of
the most popular places for sun-
bathers and swimmers among
the college crowd for many sea-
sons. Perhaps its strongest at-
traction is the free public bath-
ing beach and picnic tables. A
well-stocked concessions stand
is open during the day to pro-
vide refreshments between wa-
ter games and naps in the sun.
Students who have not visited
the lake since last year will prob-
ably not recognize it as "the of1
swimming hole" as the park has
been remodeled into a beach. Sand
and level ground have replaced
the grass and hills which former-
ly graced the water's edge. Defin-
ite parking spaces have also been
marked.
TWO PUBLIC beaches at Whit-'
more Lake provide lockers, picnic
grounds, water slides and docks
for small fees. "Starlight Gar-
dens," a dance hall, is also open
during evenings.
Many of the small sailing
crafts which are seen skimming
along the lake in the summer
belong to the University's Sail-
ing Club which summer school
students may join.
Clear Lake, located near Jack-
son, offers a county park, a swim-
ming beach and a view of rustic
outdoor life, for there are three
camps located on the lake.
* * *
ANOTHER NEARBY recrea-
tional spot well-known to summer
school students is Portage Lake,
which is also located near Jack-
son. In addition to its public
beach, which offers speedboat
rides, picnic grounds, slides and a

softball park, the lake has been a
popular one in the past for its
rented cottages.
For those who wish to take
longer trips for entertainment
on the weekends, there are vis-
its to the larger lakes on the
other side of Michigan, the Irish
Hills, the zoo at Royal Oak and
amusements in Detroit.
Edison Lake Gardens, Eastwood
and Westwood near Detroit are
popular dance places.
* * *
ALSO CONTRARY to often-
voiced opinions, the sidewalks in
Ann Arbor do not roll up at 8 p.m.
in the summertime and there is
always plenty of evening enter-
tainment which can be found not
far from the campus.
Night softball games, con-
certs, drama at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre, student reli-
gious gatherings, bridge tourna-
ments, bowling, and picnics in
the Arb and Island Park are just
a few of the amusements which
can be found after textbooks are
closed for the evening.
Dancing enthusiasts will have
little cause to worry about losing
their smooth technique during
July and August. They will have
an opportunity to keep in step at
the League dances which are held
from 9 p.m. to midnight in the
ballroom every Friday. Students
may attend the dances with or
without dates.
*' * *
SPORT FACILITIES are avail-
able at many of the city parks for
afternoon and early evening re-
creation.
Burns Park,' located on Wells
Street offers four tennis courts,
horseshoe pits, two softball dia-
m o n d s , archery, volleyball
equipment and picnic tables for
relaxation from classes. Wines
Field and West Park are two
other places which offer simi-
lar recreational facilities.
The Women's Physical Educa-
tion Department also offers a
large stock of sports equipment at
the Women's Athletic Building.
Tennis courts, softball fields, put-
ting greens and fields for archery,
soccer and other sports are open
to students who prefer the out-
doors in the summer.

NO RAIN--This coed is delighting in the pleasures of sun bathing
and also praying for "no rain." One of the most favorite pasttimes
in the summertime, sunbathing leads to many hours spent at the
beach, bleached hair, golden-colored tans and, often, blisters
and sleepless nights.
STEAKS OR HAMBURGERS:
Government Research To Find
How America Spends Money

Families in America have a
dramatically higher standard of
living now than before the war
according to economists who say
they intend to prove it next year.
For the past five months, crews
of trained research men and wo-
men have been working in 91 Am-
erican communities and have been
finding out at first-hand how Am-
erica spends its money.
* * *
WHEN THE job, which is being
sponsored by the United States
Department of Labor, is finished,
some 15,000 families will have
been studied thoroughly and the
groundwork laid for the first ma-
jor report on family finances
made in this country since 1935.
The purpose of the Depart-
ment's gigantic research pro-
gram, larger than almost any
survey in recent years except the
Census itself, is to give a new
statistical base for the Bureau
of Labor Statistics' famous con-
sumer's price index. It will also
be a new opportunity to see how
far and how fast American fam-
ilies have moved since 1935 to-
wards a higher standard of liv-
ing and towards better housing,
better diet and more adequate
clothing.
If the index goes up ten percent,
it means that the "average" f am-
ily has gone up ten percent also;
what the family once was able to

buy on a family budget of $200 a
month, for example, now costs
$220.
THE GOVERNMENT intends
the survey to be very thorough
and to attempt to measure how
much of the family's money goes
into food, how much into housing,
into clothing and into all the oth-
er kinds of family expenditures.
It will even measure the
amount of money the family
spends on different kinds of
clothing and different kinds of
food, down to shirts for papa
and mushed-up canned foods
for the baby.'
When the research job is fin-
ished, the Bureau will have infor-
mation on family spending pat-
terns in 34 cities, from which it
will work out a national average.
It will use this to bring the con-
sumer's price index up to date.
* * *
AT PRESENT the index as-
sumes that its "average" family
spends 33 percent of its income for
food, 13 percent for clothing, 11
percent for housing, 4 percent for
utilities, 6 percent for house fur-
nishings and 33 percent for ev-
erything else.
The government is almost cer
tain that this formula will change
as a result of the present study.

Walled Lake
Dance To Star
Les Brown
Other Name Bands
To Appear Nightly
Throughout Summer
Les Brown and his orchestra
will play for dancers at Walled
Lake tonight only.
Several other popular name
bands will appear at the lake's
dance hall throughout the sum-
mer. Dances are held from 9 p.m.
to 1 a.m. every night of the week
except Monday at Walled Lake,
which is located near Detroit.
Miniature golf, speedboats, a
midway and picnic grounds are
other attractions which are found
at Walled Lake, a popular place
for summertime fun.
Russ Carlyle and his orchestra
are scheduled to play tomorrow
and Sunday, followed by Benny
Strong and his men from July 11
to 19. Ray Anthony will appear
July 20 through 22 and Ray Rob-
bins, from July -25 to August 1.
Orchestras which are slated for
later in the summer are Jerry
Gray, August 3 to 5; Billy Bishop,
August 8 to 17; Vaughn Monroe,
Friday, August 10; Ralph Flan-
agan, August 18 and 19; Teddy
Phillips, August 22 to 26 and
Clyde McCoy, August 29 to Sept. 3.
Admission is charged at the door
of the dance hall. Refreshments
3nd tables and chairs are provid-
ed for relaxation.
Parking space is also provided,
but is limited.
Few Vacant
HousesToday
Despite all the new home and
apartment house construction in
the United States between 1945
and 1950, there still aren't many
vacant homes and apartments in
America for people to rent, statis-
tics show.
Census-takers last year found
only 512,000 vacant apartments
and homes for rent in all of the
United States, according to pre-
liminary reports from the Census
Bureau.
This is just about one out of
every 100 dwelling units in the
country.
Most of these vacant dwelling
units were small-the average was
less than four rooms-and only
two-thirds of them were located in
cities and suburbs, the rest in
rural areas.
At least by 1940 standards, say
Census-takers, rents were high
last year. Half of the "for rent"
apartments and houses had price
tags of $45 a month or more and
a quarter of them were for rent
at $75 a month or more.
Reunion To Be Given
At League for Alumni
Of Central Michigan
"That old gang of mine."
Central Michigan College alum-
ni will renew acquaintances and
review past college day history at
their reunion which will be held
here July 10.
Sponsored by the Ann Arbor
'chapter, the meeting will take
place in the Kalamazoo Room of
the League. Alumni will meet in
the lobby at 6 p.m. and proceed to
the cafeteria for dinner before the
official meeting.

FD

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LUJ

I

Drastic reductions from our early summer collection. Fresh styles
at real money saving reductions. Cotton chambrays, broadcloths,
imported Irish linens, print chiffons, sheer crepes. Some jacket
and sun dresses included in this group.

I

Orig. 14.95 to 17.95
Orig. $29.95 to $35

;m15
Orig. 22.95 to $25
Orig. 39.95 to $45

JUNIOR - MISSES' - WOMEN'S SIZES

MOMMM4

Drastic Reductions

SUMMER FORMALS

Lovely marquisettes, nets, velverays, chiffons

$5
Orig. 22.95
to $25

WA

A2
Orig. 29.95
to $35
JUNIOR and MISSES SIZES

Orig. 39.95
to $45

GOIN

VG OUT OF BUSINESS

i(:Y
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kl
k:1
i%?

FINE ORIENTAL RUGS
Closing Out in Two Weeks
A GOOD INVESTMENT
Several Fine Living, Dining Room and Library Rugs.
Special Regular NOW
Lovely rose field Heriz 8.6x11.6............398.00 295.00
Fine Heriz 10x14.... .. ............. .595.00 425.00
Fine Italian Made carpet 11.6x8.10.......... 115.00

SPORTSWEAR

Large Assortr
Hear
N. L. MAN(

ment of Scatter Sizes, Runners, Mats,
rth Rugs and Wall Hangings,
pen from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M.

GOUII

334 S. 4th Ave., Ph. 6878

0 0
MAYBE YOU CAN'T
MIX A COCKTAIL!
But you can mix Guatemalan Skirts and
Mexican blouses and Portuguese jewelry
and always come out right.O
500 East Liberty Phone 3-8781
0< ><-0 -0-><-0-5<-0->< ><-0->

Orig. 3.95 to 4.95..........
Orig. 5.95. -.95. . . . . - -.. .
O'ig. 7.95. .. .............s . *
Orig. 8.95 to 9.95. .........,

$3
$4
$5
$

Orig. 7.95 -......... ; .....-
Orig. 8.95-.......... . . ...
Orig. 10.95 ..............:
Orig. 12.95...... ..

BLOUSES
Tissue faille crepes, nylons and cot-
tons; sizes 32 to 38.

Cotton broadcloths, Irish linens,
shantungs.

SKIRTS

2

$5
16
7I

DUSTERS
Assorted colors in rayon linen.

KEEP COOL IN
i° h +~

Orig. 16.95 and 17.95......

$10

RAYON SUITS
Navy, pink, yellow, blue;; sizes 10
to 18.
Orig. 19.95 .. .. .. .. . ... . .. *
Orig. 22.95...... .,... ....$10
SWIM SUITS

RAINCOATS
Assorted rayon plaid favorites.
Orig. 29.95............... $2

w "9

. vti. "
S' C

Sizes 9-15,
10-24,
12 2to 24
City-Country cottons,
glamour cottons,
office cottons, tailor
cottons, suit dresses,
suntops, informals.
Hundreds of them
a in imaginative
fabrics and colors.
From
to95
"4::.1695
GINGHAMS
VOILES
CHAMBRAYS
SWISSES
PIMA BROADCLOTH
'T iTISSUE GINGHAM

i

Newest LPs-Just Received
WEBER: DER FREISCHUTZ, Complete LLPA 5 17.85
WEBER: DER FREISCHUTZ, Abridged DX 111 11.70
MOUSSORGSKY: PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION LLP 330

Orig. 15.95 to 17.95.......

11

$10

SUMMER
JIOE

E

'

Julius Katchen, Piano-

.5.95

I

LUIGINI: BALLET EGYPTIEN

ML 2180

COLERIDGE-TAYLOR: PETITE SUITE-
BACH: MUSICAL OFFERING_
BRAHMS: TRIO IN A-MAJOR_

-WL 5070
.WL 5058

-4.00
5.95
5.95

RED CROSS SHOES
Famous summer footwear in white, brown and
white, navy and white, white mesh and natur-

85

al linen.

Colored calf with white buckskin.

Orig. 10.95
to 12.95

'~i~::

'iF iii

11

I

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