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July 06, 1951 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-07-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JULY 6,1

1

WASHINGTON COMMUTER:
Flying Professor Leads Dual Life
By HADLEY OSBORN
Prof. F. W. Neal, '37, has given X
commuting a new twist, as he
travels from Washington, D.C. to f
Ann Arbor by plane every week.4
Teaching in the political science
department this summer, Prof. t ..~
Neal is also assistant to Harvard s
President James Conant on the
Committee on Present Danger
which meets in the nation's capi- ; .^'
tal. * * .
AS A RESULT he flies to Ann f
Arbor to meet his classes on Tues-
day and Wednesday, and then f
on Wednesday night rushes to fg .
Willow Run to catch a plane back ....}
to Washington where he resumes
his duties as Conant's right-hand S
man.

Gothic Film GroupWill
Present Silent Movies
By BARNES CONNABLE
Chaplin, Fairbanks, Garbo and other fabulous figures of the silent
cinema world will flash across the Gothic Film Society's screen this
summer in a weekly presentation of great movies of the late '20's and
early '30's.
Beginning Monday, with Charlie Chaplin's "The Circus," Society
members and guests will witness five entertaining milestones in Holly-
wood history, four of which are

ELSI.'..S

4

"My wife thinks this dual life
is silly," he reported, "but I like
it. Ann Arbor is a welcome re-
lief after Washington's govern-
ment-saturated atmosphere,"
A graduate of the University,
Prof. Neal was active in campus
affairs while he was here. He was
Associate Editor of The Daily in
1937.
After graduating, he became a
correspondent on the Wall Street
Journal for five years and then
went to Harvard where he received
his Master's degree.
The Navy Air Corps claimed
him during the war, and he
spent two and a half years in
the Soviet Union. He has since
become a noted authority on
that country. -
Regarding Malik's K o r e a n
Truce proposal, he said, "Like ev-
eryone else outside the Kremlin,
I don't know what the motives be-
hind it were, but in any case, it
was a smart movefor Russia.
They will be seen throughout the
world as a proponent for peace
whether the talks themselves are
successful or not."
* * *
HE BELIEVES that there is an
excellent chance that the talks
will go through as both sides want
peace, and as Russia would like to
see the war end.
Russia does not want a gen-
eral war at this time, he said,
'U' French Cluh
Will Meet Weekly
The Petite Causette, a group of
students interested in speaking
conversational French, will meet
from 3:50 to 5 p.m. every Monday
and Wednesday in the E South
Room of the Union cafeteria.
Le Cercle Francais, another stu-
dent French group, will have a
social meeting at 8 p.m. Thursday
in the League.

reel relics unavailable elsewhere.
* * *
"THE CIRCUS," Chaplin's last
silent, will be shown at 8 p.m. Mon-
day in Rackham amphitheatre.
The 1929 production is considered
by many movie connoisseurs to be
one of Chaplin's most masterful
screen performances.
Paul Rotha, British film his-
torian, critic and director, called
it "one of the greatest tragedies
in the history of films and yet
magnificently funny."
The July 16 showing will be
Douglas Fairbanks, Sr.'s "The
Three Musketeers", which was pre-
sented by the Society two seasons
ago and now brought back by
popular request. As D'Artagnan,
Fairbanks plays one of his favorite
roles.
Supporting players include Adol-
phe Menjou as Cardinal Richilieu,
Eugene Pallette, contemporary sec-
ondary cast veteran, and the late
Alan Hale.
* * *
GRETA GARBO will return to
the screen in "The Kiss" the fol-
lowing week. One of her first
American films, the 1930 love-story
was obscured during its early runs
by the increasingly popular talk-
ies. Jacques Foyder, Belgian great,
directed it.
Now in her 40's, Clara Bow was
the young temptress known as the
"It Girl" when she frolicked in
such films as "The Primrose Path,"
the Society's first offering for the
month of August.
Miss Bow was the enchanting
acress who quipped, when learn-
ing of an rejected admirer at-
tempting to blow his head off,

-Daily-James Butt
FLYING PROFESSOR-Prof. A. W. Neal caught in his weekly
act of rushing to catch a plane for Washington, D. C. Prof. Neal
is teaching a political science class at the University and is also
a member of a committee which meets in Washington.
* * * * * *

accenting the words, "at this
time."
"The Soviet's main interest lies
in communizing Eastern Europe,"
he added, "and she will not, and
in fact can not, help Communist
China materially.
"The Russian people are much
less eager to fight than they were
in World War II, and if the Polit-
buro threw the country into a war
now they would have to contend
with a lot of internal political
strife."

AS A member of the Committee
on Free Europe he is especially
interested in this area. His class
here deals with the "Government
of the Soviet Union and the East-
ern European Countries.".
"I enjoy teaching, but I may
have to confine myself to one job
at a time from now on." he chuck-
led.
"I don't want that hurried look
I'm getting to become a perma-
nent feature."

Department of Speech Plans To Produce
Miller Adaptation of Famous Ibsen Drama'

4>

-----0.

" e s

Latest of dramatic works of Ar-
thur Miller, '38, "An Enemy of the
People"-adapted from Henrik Ib-
sen's angry play - will be the
speech department's next produc-
tion.
Miller transformed the language
of a new literal translation into
colloquial American speech, which
has distinguished it from the us-
ually rigid, formal style of most
Ibsen translations.
* . .
MILLER'S PEN has given the

In Ann Arbor
508 East William

dialogue a fluidity which even
critics such as Brooks Atkinson
describe as "eternal, and idiomat-
ic."
Only 13 years have elapsed
since Miller's graduation, but in
that time the rugged-looking,
six-foot playwright has proved
that the Avery Hopwood Award
which he won when he was a
junior was not just a lucky acci-
dent.
After his graduation Miller re-
turned to Brooklyn, where he had
been raised. At first he did some
radio work, but he soon turned
most of his writing time and talent
to the theatre,
The Hopwood prize winner,
"They Too Arise," was written un-
der the direction of Prof. Kenneth
T. Rowe of the English depart-
ment, and shows a marked resem-
blance to Miller's first professional
prize-winning play, "All My Sons."
The latter won the National Crit-
ics' Circle Award in 1945.
With a small amount of re-
search work for film stories wed-
ged in between, Miller followed
"All My Sons" with his powerful
drama "Death of a Salesman."
This play, written in a feverish

"A real man would use a knife."
At one time, she described her
story conferences as "sessions
where the boys decide how soon
I'm to take my clothes off."
On August 13, Lillian Gish, star
of the controversial "Birth of a
Nation," and sister Dorothy Gish,
will head a distinguished cast in
the movie spectacle "Romola." The
film, which deals with corruption
and degeneracy in the 'Florence of
Renaissance times, was directed by
Henry King, who also molded
"Stella Dallas"
In the supporting cast will be
found Ronald Colman, then a re-
cent arrival from the British stage,
and William Powell, who later
made the talkie transition in his
famous "Thin Man" series.
Lillian Gish, now a 56-year-old
television star, reportedly gives
one of her finest performances
in the screen adaptation of the
George Eliot novel.
Other films will be shown if the
number of subscribing Society
members warrant them, according
to Society director Leo Hendrick,
Grad.
Membership for the series plus
extra films is $2.50. Money orders
or checks may be made out to the
treasurer of the Gothic Film So-
ciety and mailed to 716 N. 5th.
Rent Extension
Given Willow
Run Village
Willow Village rental authorities
have been officially ordered by the
Chicago regional office of the Pub-
lic Housing Administrator to con-
tinue filling vacancies until Au-
gust 15, Walter Funkhouser, man-
ager of the Village said yesterday.
Funkhouser believes the exten-
sion was issued under authority of
the stop-gap bill signed by Presi-
dent Truman last week which ex-
tended the Housing Act of 1950
for 45 days.
No official word has been receiv-
ed on the rumored exemption of
the Village under the "municipal-
ity" clause of the eviction and de-
molition order which originally
called for a closing of the Village
to begin July 1.
Members of the Village Resident
Council, which firstsought the
exemption and had received word
from Washington that it had been
granted, are continuing their ef-
forts to find out why the exemp-
tion order has not been issued.
Utility Leaders
To Study Here
Executives of privately owned
gas, power, and telephone com-
panies throughout the United
States will participate in an exe-
cutive development program which
the University is offering through
the business administration school
from July 9 to Aug. 4.
The study work will consist of
text assignments, case work and
reference reading along with or-
ganized discussions, between per-
sonnel directors, district manag-
ers, and plant superintendents.
The project was planned by a
faculty committee of the business
administration school with the ad-
vice of several interested public
utility executives who havehlong
recognized the need for such a
program.
Tenor Will Give
RackliarnRecital

Warren Simpkins, Grad., tenor,
will give a recital at 8:30 p.m.
Monday in Rackham Assembly
Hall.
The recital will be presented in
partial fulfillment of the require-
ments for a masters degree in mu-
sic. Accompanist will be Helen
Simpkins, pianist.
Simpkins will sing songs by
Bach, Purcell, Hatton, Mozart,
Schubert, Delius, Morgan, Quil-
ter and Olmstead. The program is
open to the public.
Meat Ration
LONDON -(A)- The British
weekly meat ration-now about
the size of a penny matchbox-
will be doubled from about the end
of August, Minister of Food Maur-
ice Webb announced in the House
of Commons yesterday.

invites students of the
to visit our department of
SHEET Music
Music of all publishers . . . Concertos, Sonatas,
Studies, Collections, Teaching Materials; in fact
you'll find EVERYTHING you will need in the
way of music here at Lyon & Healy (unless you
come up with. a really unusual manuscript --
then we'll try our utmo-t to get it for you!)
* **P
-r-
~t

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
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Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Rose gold ladies Bulova wrist
watch. Back engraved with Frank to
Joyce. Call 3-1511, Ext. 526. )99L
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Record player automatic
change; mahogany lamp table. Phone
2-8696. )150
GOLF CLUBS-Matched set Joe Kirk-
wood clubs, 4 irons, 2 woods. Never
been used. $30.95. Ph. 2-8692. )149
BE PROFICIENT IN GERMAN. Set of
15 discs for $20.50. Cost $55.00. Phone
2-3028. )148
1947 HARLEY-DAVIDSON 45 cu. in. mo-
torcycle. Excellent condition. See it
at Howell's on South U. Call John
Lauer, Univ. Ext. 2198. )146
WOMEN'S GOLF CLUBS - 4 matched
irons, 1 wood. Brand new. Never been
used. $24.95. Ph. 2-8692. )145
FOR RENT
MODERN APARTMENT on Half Moon
Lake. Boat and utilities furnished.
July through September. Chelsea 7607.
) 38F
APARTMENT-Complete kitchen, utili-
ties provided. Men preferred, near
campus. Call between 5-7 p.m., 6336.
906 Greenwood. )37F
ROOMS FOR RENT
GIRLS ROOMING HOUSE
Large studio type room. Two closets.
Two beds. Community kitchen. Be-
tween campus & hospitals. Ph. 2-2826.
)81R
SHARE APARTMENT with Grad Stu-
dent. Save on meals. $8 week. Big
yard, continuous hot water. Call
31791. ) 80R

ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS Tourist Home. Rooms by Day
or Week. Bath, Shower, Television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )IR
WASHTENAW AREA - Pleasant single
room with private lavatory and toilet.
Gentlemen preferred. 2-3868. ) 77R
ROOM AND BOARD
FOOD FOOD FOOD - Home cooked
meals for men. Excellent food and
coffee. 1319 Hill. )4X
BOARD AT FRATERNITY HOUSE --
Short block from Law Quad, corner
Hill and Oakland. Eating schedule at
your convenience. Really good food.
Ph. 2-1634. )3X
PERSONAL
STUDENT would like tutor for Physics
course. Bonus if student passes course.
Call Isadore, 2-1937. )58P

BUSINESS SERVICES
YOU MAY EARN a fortune without its
costing you a fortune by reading FOR-
TUNE at the special rates offered by
STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY, Ph.
2-8242. )33B
TYPING WANTED to do in my home.
Experienced. Ph. 7590, 830 S. Main.
)32B
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. We spe-
cialize in doing summer dresses.
MISCELLANEOUS
AT LIBERTY-German 11 and 12 in-
structor does tutoring and translation.
A. R. Neumann, 2-7909. )14M
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ARTHUR MILLER
s* s
six weeks not only won the 1947
National Critics Award, but also
the 1949 Pulitzer Prize.
PROF. HUGH Z. Norton is the
director of "An Enemy of the
People." The campus presentation
is scheduled to begin at 8 p.m.
Wednesday.
Single and season tickets for the
summer plays and for the operet-
ta "The Chocolate Soldier" may
be purchased from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Saturday
at the Lydia Mendelssohn box of-
fice.
Tickets are still available for the
performances of "Green Grow the
Lilacs" which will be given tonight
and tomorrow night.
Gifts Received
For Memorial
Friends and former students of
the late Stanton E. Tompkins, in-
structor in the mechanical engi-
neering department of the engi-
neering college who died June 15,
are contributing to a fund named
in his memory, to be used for can-
cer research in the Medical School.
MEALS 50c up;
Breakfast . ..7:00-10:00
0
- Lunch . . .,...1 0O-1 :30
c Dinner ..... 5:00-7:00 V
MEAL MART
CAFETERIA tJ
338 Maynard, Thru the Arcade
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Friday and Saturday at 7:30 and 9:30
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Complete Supply of
! Young America at the Piano
! Piano keyboard charts

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