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July 01, 1951 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1951-07-01

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WNWAY, JULY Is 1"1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

W||| A , JULY 1 ilSli |PAGE THREE

O . THESPOT
By CY CARLTON
11r EAll-Star game on July 10th should prove a salient feature in
Detroit's 250th birthday celebration and loyal fans will undoubtedly
pack Briggs Stadium to the gills for the event.
Al the imagery and color which goes with a great sports event
will be present. However there are many basic flaws in the gen-
esal makeup of the All-Star game which prevents it from becoming
a real "dream game" in the minds of many.
The most obvious flaw which turns the event from a game be-
tween the best in baseball into a popularity contest is the method of
selection of the participants. The players are picked by the vote of
the baseball fans of the nation. The ballots for the convenience of
the fans sae printed in various newspapers in these cities.
* * * *
THI method of selection has been used erratically since the game
originated in 1933. At one time it was replaced by a meeting of
major league managers who determined the players to represent each
league. However, this was recently superceded by a return to the
popular election method in order to stir fan interest in the game.
The fallacy in this method revolves aroud the fact that the
fans are not entirely objective in their choice of All Star candi-
dates Personal dislike for a player's off-diamond personality
san sway many votes. More serious is the fact that some of the
newspapers participating in the poll actively campaign for local
favorites and urge the fans in black glaring headlines to send in
their entries so that "the old home town team" can be represented
'i the festivities. This occurs regardless of the fact that the home
team may be floundering in the mire of the second division. Thus
it represents a biased perversion of any popular election method
in which participants are supposedly selected on the basis of in-
dividual merit.
it appears that the fans can not be completely relied upon to place
partisan considerations above fair play since the campaigns of local
papers to place hometown favorites on the teams usually meet with
succes.
** M s
late Judge Landis, one of the most incorruptable men ever as-
sociated with the game of baseball once made an intensive investi-
gation into the popular method of player selection for All Star games.
.le reported that the system was inherently unfair because it was
possible for one fan to send in as many ballots as he or she desired
bectiose no names were required on any of the ballots printed in news-
papers. He reported cases of 10,000 ballots being sent in from towns
hsivig barely that population. He also mentioned cases in which
hundreds of ballots were sent in from one locality, all with identical
selections.
It was through his insistence while baseball commissione that the
popular election method was abandoned in favor of having the mana-
gers select the players.
On the surface, it appears that the most amicable solution to
the problem would be to have the players of the two leagues select
the participants. After all it is the players who are the ultimate
element with which the game cannot exist. Therefore it seems
fthr to have them select the participants since they should be the
best source of knowledge of the relative merits of their opponents
and comrades.
In permitting the players this option, the problem of interesting
players in performing in this game which has grown acute in recent
years, due to numerous injuries to valuable athletes in the game, and
general apathy of the management, would be partially averted. It is
logical to assume that a player would be much more inclined to "give
his all" in such a game when he knew that his selection was due to
the high opinion of his fellow athletes, not to the bias of many rabid
fans.
However, the faults of the All Star game will not completely dis-
appear if the popularity poll is eliminated. A comprehensive study of
the game and its ramifications should definitely be made by the high
ruling moguls of baseball before the 1952 game is played. This study
should actively investigate the faults of the game as it now stands,
and suggest changes to make it a more interesting event both from
the standpoint of the fans and baseball ethics.

Yankees Blow

Chance

for

AL

Lead

Red Sox Np New York, 3=1
AsBrowns Drop White Sox.
Brooklyn Smears Phillies Via Big Inning;
Indins Continue Mastery over Tigers, 3-1
0

By The Associated Press
Chuck Stobbs, 21-year-old left-
hander of the Boston Red Sox,
posted the first victory of his ca-
reer over the New York Yankees
yesterday and the triumph pre-
vented the Yanks from taking the
American League lead.
Stobbs, a bonus player now in
his fifth season with the Sox,
turned back the Yanks, 3-1, on six
hits. The defeat left the Yanks
in second place, a half game be-
hind the Chicago White Sox, who
were upset, 4-3, by the last place
St. Louis Browns.
* * *
IN OTHER GAMES, the Cleve-
land Indians downed the Detroit
Tigers, 3-1 and the Brooklyn Dod-
gers cuffed the Philadelphia Phil-
lies, 14-8.
Stobbs, who will celebrate his
22nd birthday Monday, walked
only one batter and spread the
Yankees' six hits over as many
innings. The conquest was his
sixth of the season and the 29th
of his career.
Dick Starr, with help from Bob
Hogue in the ninth, gained credit
for his first victory of the season
at Chicago. The triumph also
ended a nine-game St. Louis los-
ing streak.
STARR, WHO has failed to go
the route in six starts, had the
Sox blanked until the eighth when
they scored once. Pinch-hitter
Don Lenhardt, a former Brownie,
doubled home two runs in the
ninth with two out to chase Starr.
Hogue relieved and threw one
pitch to Bob Dillinger, who flied
out to end the game.
Joe Dobson started for Chica-
go and was tagged for all of the
Browns' runs.
Seventh inning Home Runs by
Luke Easter and Al Rosen enabled
the Indians to score their eighth
straight victory over Detroit with-
out a loss. The homers, off Fred
Hutchinson, snapped ' a 1-1 tie.
Easter also drove in the Indians'
first run with a single in the
fourth.
THE TIGERS tied it up in the
sixth with Vic Wertz doubling
home George Kell who had walked.
Early Wynn limited the Tigers to
three hits in gaining his sixth vic-
tory against nine defeats.
The Dodgers made the most
of five errors and nine walks to
smear the Phillies. The Brooks
sewed up the game in the fourth
inning with a seven-run upris-
ing that Duke Snider featured
with a three-run Homer, his
17th of the season.
Bubba Church, seeking his sev-
enth straight victory, was tagged
for three runs in the second and
third innings before he was ham-
mered out in the fourth.
* * *
RAIN WASHED OUT games be-
tween the Chicago Cubs and Cin-
cinnati Reds and the Washington
Senators and Philadelphia Athle-
tics.

In National League night
games, the Boston Braves shelled
the New York Giants, 19-7 mak-
ing n e w manager Tommy
Holmes' Boston debut a fabulous
success and the Cardinals beat
Pittsburgh, 8-4.
Earl Torgeson homered twice, in-
cluding a grandslammer and Sid
Gordon once, as the tribesmen cut
loose with a 18 hit barrage to chase
Giant ace Sal Maglie from the
mound.
Maglie in search of his 13th win
of the season went into the sev-
enth_ inning with a 7-4 lead but
the Braves hammered eight runs
across the plate in the seventh
to take the lead. They scored seven
more in the eighth off Al Gettel.
Vern Bickford started for the
Braves with Max Surkout getting
the win in relief.
The Cards chased ex-teammate
Murry Dickson from the mound
with seven runs in the fourth in-
ning as Cliff Chambers held the
Bucs to five hits at Sportsman's
Park.
SBaseball's
BigSix

Snead Cops
Key Match
In PGA Golf.
OAKMONT, Pa. - (W) -Unpre-
dictable Sam Snead grooved his
shots in the face of a violent rain-
storm and scorching comeback
pressure to subdue Lloyd Man-
grum, 3 and 2, and push into thej
quarter-finals of the Professionalj
Golfers Association toifinament.
In whipping the tiger-hearted'
Mangrum, the year's leading mon-
ey winner and pre-tournament
choice, Snead became heavy fa-
vorite to capture his third PGA
championship. He won in 1942
and 1949.
* * *
FIVE HOLES ahead -at .one
stage, the belting West Virginian
saw his wiry rival from Niles, Ill.,
level the match on the 28th after
hostilities had been held up al-
most an hour by a thunderstorm
that blew down on hilly Oak-
mont from the lower Allegheny
River Valley.
But Snead took an extra
hitch in his belt, won three
straight holes and closed out the
tilt on the short 34th when an
18-foot Mangrum putt rolled to
the tip of the cup and then
squirmed away.
Snead thus went into tomor-
row's round of eight against 28-
year-old Jack Burke, Jr., of Hous-
ton, "baby" of the touring pro
brigade, who eliminated Gene
Kunes of Cleveland, 4 and 3.
OTHER SURVIVORS during the
long, wet and hectic day were
Johnny Bulla of next door Verona,
Pa., playing the best match play
golf of the tournament; Ellsworth
Vines, of Los Angeles, once the
greatest tennis player in the
world; Reggie Myles of Lansing,
Mich., Walter Burkemo of Frank-
lin, Mich.; the Veteran Al Brosch
of Garden City, N. Y., and Charles
Bassler of Catonsville, Md., who
was carried 37 holes.
B e s i d e s the Snead-Burke
match, the quarter-finals send
Bassler against Brosch, Burkemo
against Myles and Vines against
Bulla.
Two former champions-tower-
ing Jim Ferrim of San Francisco
and Vic Ghezzi of Inwood, N.Y.-
were third round victims, leaving
the field still studded with dark
horses.

CHICAGO - (-> - Brooklyn's
Dodgers landed more players in
the All-Star game thaif any other
team, final tabulation of baseball
fandom's voting disclosed yester-
day.
In a record-shattering outpour-
ing, the fans picked three Dodgers
to start in the 18th inter-league
game at Detroit, July 10. Phila-
delphia's Phillies, Chicago's White
Sox, Detroit's Tigers and Boston's
Red Sox will be represented by
two players each.
* * *
BIGGEST VOTE catcher was
Stan Musial of the St. Louis Car-
dinals, who rolled up 1,428,383
ballots in winning the Left Field
nomination for the National
League. Third Baseman George
Kell of Detroit captured the vote
crown last year.
A total of 4,274,978 votes were
cast in the poll conducted by
newspapers, radio stations and
magazines. Votes came from
every state in the Union and
from many foreign countries.
The total vote last year was 3,-
167,362.
The list of players chosen by
the fans and their batting aver-
ages follows:
AMERICAN LEAGUE
1B-F. Fain, Philadelphia . ..356
2B--Nelson Fox, Chicago ...347
3B-George Kell, Detroit ....321
SS-C. Carrasquel, Chicago .284
RF-Vic Wertz, Detroit .....306
CF--Dom Di Maggio, Boston .341
LF-Ted Williams, Boston .341
C-Larry Berra, New York .303
* * *
NATIONAL LEAGUE
1B-Gil Hodges, Brooklyn . ..274
2B-J. Robinson, Brooklyn .360
3B-Bob Elliott, Boston .....339
SS-Alvin Dark, New York .337
RF-D. Ennis, Philadelphia .292
CF-R. Ashburn, Ph'delphia .353
LF--Stan Musial, St. Louis .372
C-R. Campanella, Brooklyn .327
CASEY STENGEL, Manager of
the World Champion New York

* * *

Dodgers Dominate All-Stars

ROY CAMPANELLA
... one of three
S * * *
Yankees, will direct the American
League entry. The Philadelphia
Phillie's Eddie Sawyer will man-
age the National League team.
Each squad will be composed
of 25 players, incuding eight'
pitchers. All pitchers will be
chosen by the managers. The
managers can name any other
players they please to the squad,
and are not bound by the order
of voting beyond the fan's first
choice in each position.
The complete American League
team will be announced Monday
morning and the National League's
full roster will be published Tues-
day afternoon.
NELSON FOX of the White Sox
was second in the balloting, gar-
nering 1,419,428 votes. Jackie Rob-
inson was third with 1,412,144 and
Ted Williams fourth wtih 1,404,-
768. This will berthe ninth All-
Star game for Williams, who holds
a batting average of .417 for these
games.
The final tabulations upset

several players who had been in
the lead in the semi-final vote.
The fans settled on Hodges, who
has 24 home runs to his credit,
over Pittsburgh's Ralph Kiner,
who has 17 home runs, to start
at First Base for the Nationals.
Brooklyn's Pee Wee Reese lost
out at short stop in the final count
to Dark and White Sox's Ed Rob-
inson was overtaken by Fain. The
hot race for Short Stop in the
American League went to Carras-
quel over the Yankee's Phil Riz-
zuto by 1,309,538 to 1,213,714.
The Game wil be the 18th in the
series. The American League has
won 12 and the National League
5.
OS U's Nieporte
Wins Links Title
COLUMBUS, O.-(P)--Tom Nie-
porte of Ohio State-the lad who
swings like a golf teacher In-
stead of a student-captured the
1951 NCAA Golf Championship
yesterday.
He defeated teammate Don
Johnson, 5 and 3, in the first one-
school finale the 45-year-old NCAA
tourney has seen.
Nieporte was never behind after
the 11th hole in the morning
round of their scheduled 36-hole
match.
WELCOME TO
MICHIGAN
We specialize in
" SHORT CUTS
* PERSONALITY STYLES
For your comfort
r FAN COOLED SHOP
r NO WAITING
* 7 HAIR STYLISTS
The Dascola Barbers
Liberty off State

By The Associated Press
Player and Club G AB R HI
Musial, Cardinals 63 234 50 86
Minoso, W'te Sox 65 223 61 81
Robinson, Dod'gr 67 242 51 86
Ashburn, Phillies 67 275 43 97
Fain, Athletics 67 242 31 85
Fox, white Sox 69 266 53 91
RUNS BATTED IN
National League
Snider, Dodgers..................
Westlake, Cardinals..............
Musial, Cardinals ................
American League
Williams, Red Sox...............
Robinson, White Sex ...........
Stephens, Red Sox.............
HOME RUNS

Pct.
.368
.363
.355
.353
.351
.342

54
54
49
70
66
56

i _.:.=

I

National League
Hodges, Dodgers .................. 24
Snider, Dodgers .................. 17
Westlake, Cardinals............... 17
Kiner, Pirates.................... 17
American League
Zernial, Athletics.................17
Robinson, White Sox.............. 16
Williams, Red Sox ................ 14
Wertz, Tigers ......................14

I

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Three Yanks in Quarter-Finals
Of Wimbleton Tennis Tourney

6

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The Typewriter and Stationery Store
TYPEWRITERS STUDENT
Repaired 3 Ring Notebooks
Sold Fountain Pens
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WIMBLEDON - W)- "Center
Court Shakes," made worse by the
presence of Queen Mother Mary in
the royal box, proved too much
yesterday for Hamilton Richard-
son, the 17-year-old golden boy
from Baton Rouge, La.
He was dumped unceremoni6us-
ly from the All-England Tennis
Championships by Armando Vie-
ira, The Champion of Brazil, as
two of his American teammates,
Dick Savitt and Herbie Flam, bat-
tled their way into the quarter-
finals.

Major League Standings

AMERICAN
iv
Chicago.......43
New York ... 42
Boston ........40
Cleveland .... 36
Detroit........31
Washington .. 25
Philadelphia 26
St. Louis .... 20

LEAGUE
L Pct.
24 .642
24 .636
27 .597
30 .545
32 .492
39 .391
41 .388
46 .303

GB
3
10
16y/.
17
221
Post-

NATIONAL
Wv
Brooklyn .... 42
New York .... 38
St. Louis ....,34
Philadelphia .33
Cincinnati3.. 32
Boston........'31
Chicago ........28
Pittsburgh ... 25

LEAGUE
L Pct.
25 .627
32 .543
32 .515
34 .493
33 .492
34 .477
33 .459
40 .385

GB
5% j
71f
9
9
10
i
16

COMPLETELY LACKING the
fire control he demonstrated in his
sensational second round upset of
defending champion Budge Patty
of Los Angeles, Richardson bowed
to Vieira's lightning service and
brilliant net play, 6-3, 1-6, 6-3, 6-0.
He won his only set, the sec-
ond, while the dowager queen was
out to tea. "Ham" also was do-
ing all right until she returned
in the third, but from that point
on the youngster didn't win a
single game and actually scored
only 12 points in the final seven
games. It was a severe anti-
climax for the crowd of 15,00.
Savitt, of Orange, N. J., banged
his way past Josef Asboth, balding
Hungarian veteran, 6-4, 6-2, 6-3,
while Flam, who was runner-up to
Art Larsen in the last U. S. Nation-
als, outclassed Hans Van Swol of
the Netherlands, 6-2, 6-2, 6-3.
* * *
LARSEN ALREADY had won his
way into the quarter-finals with a
victory yesterday over Torsten Jo-
hannsen of Sweden. Thus, three
of the eight survivors who will con-
tinue play for the big silver cup on
Monday are candidates for the
next American Davis Cup team.
Unfortunately, all three are
packed into the upper half of
the draw, so there can be no
possibility of an All-American
f inal.
F lam, who has been winning all
week, faces his first severe test
when he tangles next with Frank
Sedgman, the Australian ace who
is seeded No. 1 in the tournament.

Summer

Read and Use Daily Classifieds

MICHIGAN

DAILY

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 3, Detroit 1.
St. Louis 4, Chicago 3.
Boston 3, New York i.
Washington at Philadelphia,
poned, rain.
* G E '
TODAY'S GAMES

m

U

STUDENT
PERIODICAL AGENCY
Proudly Presents to
STUDENTS and EDUCATORS
SPECIAL SUMMER SCHOOL RATES

St. Louis at Chicago-(2)-Pillette
(3-5) and Garver (9-4) or Byrne (2-3)
vs. Holcombe (5-4 and Kretlow (2-2)
or Pierce (7-6).
Detroit at Cleveland -(2) -Gray
(3-7) and Cain (6-5) vs. Feller (10-2)
and Chakales (2-2).
Washington at Philadelphia-(2)-
Moreno (2-4) and Johnson (3-3) vs.
Fowler (3-4) and Shantz (7-4).
Boston at New York-Parnell (9-4)
vs. Lopat (10-3).
SONLY PLACE SO

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Brooklyn 14, Philadelphia S.
New York 7, Boston 19.
Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 8.
Chicago at Cincinnati Postponed,
rain.
* * *
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Boston-Jansen (8-6)
vs. Spahn (8-6) or Nichols (3-1).
Philadelphia at Brooklyn-Meyer
(5-5) vs. Newcombe (10-4).
Chicago at Cincinnati-(2)-Lown
(1-4) and Minner (3-6) vs. Fox (3-4)
and Perkowski (2-2) or Blackwell
(7-6).
Pittsburgh at St. Louis-Pellet (2-3)
vs. Munger (3-3).

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