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August 09, 1951 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-08-09

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREN

h ON THEl SPOT
By GEORGE FLINT
Daily Sports Editor
THE HOTTEST team in baseball these days has probably the most
unobstrusive manager in the major leagues.
Charley Dressen, who holds the puppet strings for the national
league-leading Brooklyn Dodgers, has said little and, to outward ap-
pearances, done nothing while the power-laden Bums have gone about
their house-wrecking business in the senior circuit.
* * * *
BUT DRESSEN, always a sound baseball man, has done a great
job in harnessing the tremendous potential present in the Brooklyn
club and making it function game after game. Praticularly effective
has been his ability with the pitchers.
Although his outspoken attitude toward hard-luck hurler
Erv Palica has drawn some wry comment, Dressen's firm hand
with Don Newcombe and Preacher Rowe, who have been used to
their fullest ability, and with second-line pitchers Carl Erskine
and Ralph Branca prove the Dodger pilot an astute manager,
possibly the best in the league.
The consistency of the Dodgers has been phenomenal. While
teams like the Phillies and Cardinals have their hot streaks and their
cold streaks, the Dodgers make like Old Man River.
" They could lose the pennant, though. The Phillies almost man-
aged to do it last season after leading by ten games in August. But
with the experienced hand of Dressen to guide the million-dollar
collection of supermen, it's not likely.
AUGUST IS more or less of a twilight month for action in the
sports world, but one most notable event (from a Michigan stand-
point) takes place in Soldiers' Field, Chicago come the 17th.
It's the College All-Star football game, brain child of Chicago
Tribune sports editor Arch Ward and an eagerly-awaited event for
area athletic fans.
r* * *
WHAT MAKES this year's game particularly interesting for
Michigan fandom is that two Wolverine backfield stars, Don Dufek
and Charlie Ortmann, are on the All-Star team and figure to see a
lot of action.
Yale's Herman Hickman, who directs the All-Stars whenever
he can take off from cerebrating on television, has made Ortmann
Into a T-formation quarterback. This looks to be a smart move,
since the blond Milwaukean's chief talents are in ball-handling
and passing. Though he did some good work on the ground for the
past three Michigan teams, his aerial artistry was the big factor
in bringing three straight Big Ten championships to Ann Arbor.
The pile-driving Dufek, one of the country's most underrated
players last season, may turn out to be the surprise star of the game.
Even the tough and massive line of the Cleveland Browns, who fur-
nish the All-Stars the professional opposition, may find the speedy
fullback a tough man to handle.
The game is played at night before what always seems to be a
sellout crowd of 100,000 plus. The Tribune hanles ticket orders.
* * * *
BUTTON, BUTTON, who's got a commissioner?
As far as the Major League owners are concerned, maybe they
have and maybe they haven't. Right now they're not telling. Five
candidates have been mentioned as principal favorites to succeed A. B.
(Happy) Chandler, who says he is much happier now than when he
was compounding diamond headaches.
Three are baseball men--Warren Giles of the Cincinnati
Reds, Ford Frick, president of the National League, and George
Trautman, boss of the minor leagues. The other two are national
figures. Take your choice between a staunch Republican, the Old
General himself, Douglas MacArthur, or a stauncher Democrat,
New Deal axeman Jim Farley.
From here it looks like Frick is the most capable man for the job,
and in addition is populara with the players. But the general con-
sensus is that an unknown (now) but prominent figure is the club
owner's choice. If they can't agree on him or he won't accept, then
one of the fabulous five takes the gold medal.

Tribe
Cadet Coach
Speaks Out
For System
Blaik Deplores
'Mental Load'
(Continued from Page 1)
"The little informal tutoring
had no official connection with
the Military Academy," Blaik said.
"The relatively minor expens-
es were met by some of our in-
terested civilian alumni. No
Government or athletic associa-
tion funds were used. Duncan
paid his own way to West Point
and reutrn to his home. His
small expenses here were taken
care of as stated."
MacDonald passed the exam-
inations, but decided to enter the
University of Michigan instead of
West Point.
"We were sorry to lose him,"
said Blaik, "as he would have
made a fine officer.
* * *
THE COACH said all 24 boys
invited to the cram course al-
ready had or were assured of the
required Congressional appoint-
ments to the Academy-subject to
their ability to cope with the en-
trance examinations.
Blaik, who has turned out
powerhouse squads ranking high
among the nation's best year
after year, estimated that 75
per cent of all Cadets either had
previous college training or took
special cram courses to enter
West Point.
Referring to the recent scandal
involving violation of the honor
code, Blaik said the "physical and
mental load" carried by West
Point Cadets was a prime factor
in the "regrettable" episode of
the 90, who, having successfully
gained entrance, succumbed to
classroom "cribbing."
The 90 accused meanwhile still
were being interviewed one by one
by a review board.
Non-accused students showed
little sympathy for those charg-
ed with cribbing.
Some told reporters they would
stay away from the football sta-
dium if the football players were
allowed to play again, and some
even threatened to resign from
the Academy unless the cheaters
left.
In Washington, Congressional
investigating committees, after at
first considering stepping into the
case, leaned toward a hands off
attitude to allow the Army to
handle the situation, itself.

lis

Top on Feller's

18th

in

Veteran Righthander Tops
Browns as Yankees Lose

i

Tam's World Meet Opens

GEORGE KELL
... for Bengals, needed punch
Major League
Standings

AMERICAN
W
Cleveland ... 66
New York ...65
Boston........61
Chicago ..... 60
Detroit........49
Washington . 46
Philadelphia . 40
St. Louis ...32

LEAGUE
L Pct.
39 .629
39 .625
43 .587
47 .561
54 .476
58 .442
66 .377
73 .305

GB
'..
42
7
16
26
34

* * *
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 2, St. Louis 1.
Detroit 6, Chicago 5 (11 innings).
Washington 4, New York 1.
Boston - Philadelphia postponed,
rain.
* * *
TODAY'S GAMES
Washington at New York-Moreno
(4-7) vs. Kuzava (7-5).
Philadelphia at Boston (2)-Kellner
(7-9) and Martin (6-4) vs. McDermott
(7-5) and Kiely (2-2).
St. Louis at Detroit-Sanford (2-7)
vs. Stuart (4-0).
NATIONAL LEAGUE

By The Associated Press
CLEVELAND-Bob Feller pitch-
the Cleveland Indians into first
place of the American League yes-
terday and became the first ma-
jor league hurler to win 18 games
this season, as the Tribe beat the
St. Louis Browns 2 to 1 for their
seventh straight win.
Cleveland's victory came while
the Washington Senators were
knocking off the New York Yan-
kees 4 to 1.
THAT PUT the Indians out
front with 66 wins and 39 losses
for a .629 percentage. New York's
record is 65 and 39 for .625.
Bob Porterfield, former New
York Yankee right hander,
knocked his ex-mates out of
first place as he hurled a 4-1
victory for the Washington Sen-
ators.
Mickey Vernon, veteran Senator
first baseman, gave Porterfield all
the batting support he needed to
gain the decision over Vic Raschi.
The big Yankee ace, who was
seeking his 17th victory, was sub-
merged by Vernon, personally.
Mickey blasted two homers, each
with a runner aboard, to account
for all the Washington tallies.
GEORGE KELL rapped a single
to drive home the winning run
in the eleventh inning as the De-
troit Tigers battled from behind
to nip the Chicago White Sox 6
to 5.
A moment earlier pinchhitter
Steve Souchock had doubled
home Jerry Priddy with the ty-
ing, run. Relief pitcher Dizzy
Trout, 36 year old righthander,
was credited with the win, his
sixth against 12 losses.
Stopping late inning rallies by
the Chicago Cubs in both games,
the Cincinnati Reds swept a
doubleheader 7 to 5 and 4 to 3
before 14,829.
THE REDS hammered 14 hits
in the opener as Ewell Blackwell
posted his 11th win against 10
defeats and Herman Wehmeier
checked the Cubs with five hits
in the nightcap to record his sec-
ond win compared with five losses.
Eddie Waitkus tripled off Wil-
lard Marshall's glove with two
on and twq out and the Phila-
delphia Phils one run behind
in the eighth to give the Phils
a 3-2 triumph over the Boston
Braves.
Ralph Caballero doubled with
one out and Bill Nicholson, pinch-
hitting for Ken Johnson walked.
Waitkus then smashed a drive to
right that Marshall dropped after
a long run.
BILLY COX'S single off the wall
with the bases loaded in the 10th
inning boosted Brooklyn's Nation-
al League lead to 11'/2 games,
high mark of the season, with a
7-6 win over the runnerup New
York Giants for a sweep of their
day-night doubleheader. The Dod-
gers took the day game, 7-2.
Singles by Andy Pafko, Roy
Campanella and Gil Hodges
loaded the bases after two were
out in the 10th. Then Cox blast-
ed a Dave Koslo pitch to left to
break up the game.
Don Newcombe took a 6-3 lead
into the ninth but the Giants
knocked him out to score three
and send the game into extra inn-
ings. Bobby Thomson's home run

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 _63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
FOR SALE
FLOURESCENT LAMP in top shape.
Sells for $27 new. will sell for $17.
Call 8178. )176
COLUMBIA LP record player attach-
ment $8.00. Call 2-5237 after 6 p.m.
)175
PARAKEETS, Canaries, and Finches-.
New and used cages. 562 So. Seventh.
Phone 5330. )164
FOR RENT
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME noW offers
an apartment finding service free to
their guests. 100% results to date.
Over 30 apt's. available. Try us. 518
E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )41F
ROOMS FOR RENT
MALE STUDENTS
VERY GOOD suite for 3, with porch.
1 double, 2 singles for fall and spring
semesters. Close to hospitals, adjacent
to campus. Phone 6466. )85R

ROOMS FOR RENT
FOR MEN-Spacious, double, in beau-
tiful home. Shown before noon or
after 4 P.M., 1430 Cambridge. . )84R
ROOM AND BOARD
FOR RENT FOR BOYS-Rooms with or
without weekly board. Also two rooms
and kitchen and one room and kit-
chen. Call 2-8269. )5X
MISCELLANEOUS
RETURNING IN THE FALL?
Place your order for 2 semesters of
Time ($2), Life ($2.50) now and receive
your copies when school begins. Pay
then if you wish. STUDENT PERI-
ODICAL AGENCY, Ph. 2-8242, 330
Municipal Ct. Bldg. )17M
PERSONAL
GRADUATING?
Your last chance to get student rates
for Fortune, Life, Time, Magazine of
Building, Newsweek, Holiday. Don't
be sorry-phone your order to 2-8242,
Student Periodical Agency, 330 Mu-
nicipal Ct. Bldg. )66P

accounted for the first run. New-
combe left with two on and two
out but reliefer Clyde King hit
Don Mueller with a pitched ball
and gave up a two-run single to
Monte Irvin.
A 14-hit Pittsburgh attack, fea-
tured by three hits that went for
triples as the ball skipped past
center-fielder Harry Lowrey, gave
the Pirates a 10 to 7 triumph
over the St. Louis Cardinals. Gus
IBell had three of the hits-a sin-
gle, triple and homer-to lead the
attack.

I SAYE T/ME
*s ANOMONfY

CHICAGO-(OP)-Golf's richest show, the $56,000 "World" cham-
pionship with concurrent men's and women's open competition, opens
today with U. S. Open champion Ben Hogan returning to the course
he scorned for four years.
Hogan joined the field of 64 hand-picked pros shooting for a lush
$12,500 first prize, he said, because promoter George S. May has made
his Tam O'Shanter carnival a better golf meet than it used to be.
After winning the 1947 "World," then a 36-hole winner-take-
all, $5,000 event, Hogan criticized Tam's former circus aspects,
including required number-wearing by players, masked marvels
and other gimmicks May figured would please the crowd. "Just
say that this is a golf tournament now," said Hogan in explaining
why he ended his four-year boycott of Tam.
Hogan is the only addition to the pro field which was screened
to 63 after last weekend's All-American tourney which had a starting
field of 118.

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished work. and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-uU
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. We spe-
cialize in doing summer dresses.
TYPING WANTED-To do in my home.
Experienced. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.
)408
HELP WANTED
ENG. STUDENTS 18-20. Part time po-
sition with fast growing organization
in Graphic Arts Field. Must be able
to work with little supervision on
process development and production
problems. Mechanical drawing, basic
chemistry, and physics essential. Pbo-
tography as a hobby would be helpful.
Write about yourself to P. O. Box 203,
Ann Arbor. )83H
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED for one, Norwalk, Vir-
ginia around Aug. 20. 2-8539. )42T
RIDE WANTED to San Antonio or
vicinity about Aug. 18. Call 3-1408.
)40T

Brooklyn
New York ...
Philadelphia
St. Louis ....
Boston ...
Cincinnati ..
Chicago
Pittsburgh..

w
68
59
56
48
48
49
44
42

L
35
49
51
52
54
55
56
62

Pet.
.660
.546
.523
.480
.471
.471
.440
.404

GB
111/
14
181/2
191/
19%
222
26%

* * *
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Brooklyn-Maglie (15-
5) vs. Branca (9-3).
Boston at Philadelphia-Nichols (5-
3) vs. Church (12-6).
Cincinnati at Chicago-Fox (6-7)
'vs. Lown (2-6).
Pittsburgh at St. Louis (N)-Law
(3-7) or Pollet (4-7) vs. Chambers (7-
10).
* 0 *
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cincinnati 7-4, Chicago 5-3.
Philadelphia 3, Boston 2.
Brooklyn 7-7,,New York 2-6.
Pittsburgh 10, St. Louis 7.

o L. G. BALFOUR CO.
FRATERNITY JEWELRY
CUPS AND TROPHIES
MICHIGAN SOUVENIRS
GI FTS
SUMMER STORE HOURS - 12:30 till 5:00
Closed Saturdays
"Home of the official Michigan Rings."
Cooaosne- ac04>c0n"

Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

-

TODAY

S. L. Cinema Guild

MICHIGAN COACH TESTIFIES:
Baseball Needs Another Landis--Fisher
4.)

Presents

GOOD-BYE
MY FANCY
JOAN CRAWFORD

Alfred Hitchcock's

WASHINGTON- OP) -An old-
time ball player came out yester-
day for a high commissioner on
the style of the man who once put
him on baseball's blacklist.
Ray Fisher, a former Cincinnati
Red pitcher who has been coach-
ing baseball for 31 years at the
University of Michigan, told a
House judiciary subcommittee:
"I THINK the players would
get a fair deal if they had a com-
missioner like Judge Landis."
He referred to the late Kene-
saw M. Landis, the game's first
czar, who was succeeded by A.
[Ia

B. (Happy) Chandler, recently
deposed.
This opinion came after Chair-
man Celler (D-N.Y.) asked him if
he thought it was proper that the
16 major league club owners
should have the exclusive right in
naming a successor to Chandler.
* * *
THE 63-year-old right-hander
indicated it didn't make any dif-
ference as long as the man chosen
had "character, honesty, integrity
and everything like that."
He endorsed the controversial
reserve clause in players' con-
tracts, saying it served to pro-
tect the game from dishonesty.
If it weren't in effect, he said,
a player might be induced to lay
down or play sick during a hot
pennant race by a promise he
would be hired by an opposing
team for the next season.
"I don't say that would happen,"
he went on, "but the reserve clause
acts to prevent it."
QUIETLY AND without rancor,
Fisher recalled the circumstances
of his suspension by Landis in
1921.
He was with Cincinnati and
pitched in the 1919 scandal ser-

ies with the Chicago Black Sox,
losing 3-0 "because I worked
against one of their honest
pitchers."
Dickie Kerr was the Chicago
pitcher that day,
About ten years ago, he went
on, he received from baseball "for
long and meritorious service" a
silver pass which enables him to
go to any baseball game in the
country free of charge.
"I guess that meant I wasn't
suspended any longer," he smiled.
The committee will meet again
on Friday.
Fisher Coached
Phillies Hurler
Michigan coach Ray Fisher,
who testified before the subcom-
mittee investigating organized
baseball today, has had contact
with the professional game for
many years.
In addition to his playing car-
eer, he has long been a coach of
teams in the Northern League in
Vermont, where he helped to de-
velop Phillies star Robin Robert.

and

"Lifeboat"

D. O.A.

EDMOND O'BRI EN
Friday and Saturday
THE SUN DOWNERS
John Barrymore Jr.
Robert Preston

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with

I TALLULAH BANKHEAD

vo 1- 244c to
1j~~F6:30 P.M
Continuous
Daily from 1 P.M.

Hill Auditorium.

Fri., Sat. 50c
ONE SHOW
Each Night

DARK CITY
Elizabeth Scott

8:30 P.M.

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Sizes_4tto.+r 99
~- a Q -
Sizes 4 to 11 095
Wdths
4A to C
Six Styles to Choose From
FnD ymh!

--Last Times

Today-

DON'T MISS THESE-

- _ . ....... _ T

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Last Two Days
44c to 6:30 P.M.
Monday Tlhru Friday

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NEWEST LONG-PLAYING RECORDS!

--STARTS TODAY-

:CfNICOLOR

Coorb
Coming

Friday

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ONLY SATURDAY AND
MONDAY TICKETS AVAILABLE
for the
Deparlment of Speech and Music Department
Presentation of
"THE CHOCOLATE

LOVE AND LAUGHS ARE
BUSTW OUT ALL OVER!
II

PROKOFIEV-LIEUTENANT KIJE SUITE
Love for Three Oranges Suite
(First Appearance at 333 RPM)
CYRANO DE BERGERAC HIGHLIGHTS
Starring Jose Ferrer_
BERG-DER WEIN, CONCERT ARIA
Boerner, Soprano and Janssen Symphony_.

P8149
,-.4.98

S283
L8150
3.98

HOWARD HANSON: PIANO CONCERTO IN E ML 4403
Firkusny, Piano; Hanson conducting Eastman-Rochester Symphony 5.45

TCHAIKOVSKY: PIANO CONCERTO No. 1
Schioler, Piano; Danish Radio Orchestra_

MG 10094
4.85
ML 2191
4.00

I

11

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BRAHMS: STRING QUARTET No. 1
Budapest Quartet_

I or-MrAl t a lk" IV j LL.;Am

P ffrtfrj!M

I II

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