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June 28, 1951 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-06-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

41 1

FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TbUtUiDAX, JUNE 28, 1951

FOUR T1iUt$~DAY, JUNE 28, 1951

--W

-i

DEFERMENTS 'FADE AWAY':
New UMT Law Alters
Draft Status for Many

The Universal Military Training
and Service law which President
Harry Truman signed last week
may mean that the draft defer-
ments for at least 370,000 men
are going to "fade away" within
the next few months.
Among this number will be
those with only one dependent-.
classified 3-A-, some mental and
physical 4-Fs, plus a small num-
ber of aliens and conscientious
objectors.
BUT THERE is no necessity for
anyone in any of these categories
to start closing up shop right
away. Selective service headquar-
ters expects the complicated re-
classification and induction ma-
chinery to delay the inductions at
least until late August.
Only if those classified 3-A
have acquired more thai one
dependent or if the one depen-
dent would suffer hardship and
privation will the 3-As be al-
lowed to remain such. Other-
wise, they will be reclassified
starting from scratch.
If the 3-A has a wife who is
pregnant, a doctor's statement to
that effect sent to the draft board
will allow him to stay in this cate-
gory. A similar type of statement

from such disinterested people as
the family doctor or minister is
necessary in the case of a depen-
dent who would suffer hardship
or privation.
* * *
ALTHOUGH the army says its
physical standards are already as
low as they were during the "bar-
rel scraping" period of 1945, the
mental standards are going to be
lowered now.
Physical 4-Fs will probably
retain their category unless their
condition has improved, but
mental 4-Fs can expect to be
ordered to their boards to take
the Armed Services Qualification
Test again.
The 45-minute ASQT has been
designed to measure a man's abil-
ity to learn, not his education. To
pass it, however, a man does need
the minimum knowledge of Eng-
lish and arithmetic given in grade
school.
PREVIOUS to the new law, a
"percentile score" of less than 13
was necessary for mental defer-
ment. That meant that 13 per
cent of the population as a whole
-not just the draftees-would
flunk it. The new law requires
that only the bottom 10 per cent
will fail.
All ASQT flunkees may not be
called up for reclassification, but
certainly those who previously
scored between 10 and 13 will be.
The army estifnates that 200,000
men who have been classified 3-A
will be reclassified. Until they
are, the organized air, naval or
marine reserve corps will still ac-
cept them. They also expect to
claim over 150,000 mental 4-Fs.
All the information in the draft
record will be considered by the
board, and they will decide if
those affected by the new law are
eligible for the 2-A(s) students
category, the 2-A category for es-
sential workers, or the 2-C cate-
gory for essential farm workers.

'Union Ends
Meal Plans
For Sunday
Dining room service at the Un-
ion will be suspended this sum-
mer each Sunday in July and the
first three Sundays in August.
However, the cafeteria will be
open to unescorted women from
2:30 to 5 p.m. on the same days.
REASONS FOR these changes
are plans of the League to termi-
nate meal service at 3 p.m. Sun-
days and expectation by the Un-,
ion of many women visitors dur-
ing the summer session.
Women escorted by members
of the Union will be welcome
during the regular week-day
cafeteria hours.
They will have few other privi-
leges in the Union, since the
bowling alleys will not be open
and the billiard room was closed
to women last May.
* * *
THE SWIMMING pool will be
open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. ev-
ery day except Tuesday, when the
Department of Physical Education
for Women wil be using it from 7
to 10 p.m.
The soda bar will be open from
noon to 10 p.m. every day, with
service extended to include Sun-
days.
Guest facilities for overnightl
guests and members will be avail-I
able throughout the summer term.j

FIRST OFFENDER--An unidentified second grade teacher, who
recently closed up shop in a well-known East Lansing school, is
caught red-handed in the first summer violation of the Univer-
sity's auto restrictions. The coed, a graduate student in anatomy,
drove to a nearby lake with a male companion, forgetting that
the summer recreational privilege applies to driving to outdoor
sports of a group nature. She attempted to explain away her
bold undertaking by maintaining that her male companion was
a schizophrenic.
Vacuum Cleaners May
A id A liergy/ Sufferers

Baler Blasts
St. Lawrence
Project Plans
Prof. Louis A. Baier, chairman
of the University Department of
Naval Architecture and Marine
Engineering, blasted the proposed
St. Lawrence Seaway project as
economically unsound and unreal-
istic in terms of modern shipping.
"Construction of the St. Law-
rence Seaway and on the improve-
ments that would be necessary in
many of our Great Lakes ports
makes the cost of the project an
unwise *xpendituxe of money,
time and material," Prof. Baier
said.
HE POINTED out that tremen-
dously expensive dredging opera-
tions would be needed to make the
waterway deep enough for sea-
going vessels and to make such
ports as Bufalo and Detroitac-
cessible.
Present-day shipping designs
require waterways at least 35
feet deep for sea-going vessels,
which is eight feet more than
the planned 27 food depth for
the seaway.
Even if the seaway were com-
pleted, he noted, climatic condi-
tions would permit shipping for
only 240 days out of the year. As
a result the project would not ful-
fill the transportation needs of
the Labrador-Quebec region dur-
ing the wintertime.
American standards of living
and working conditions of modern
shipping vessels have climbed to
such a peak that economic de-
mands call for large crafts that
can handle enormous cargoes,
Professor Baier said.
Under the proposed seaway
plans, only foreign "tramp"
steamers operating with substan-
dard living conditions and cap-
able of carrying but a fraction of
the tonnage of large American
ships, would be able to navigate
the project.

It's always BASS WEEJUN time
but su.mer most of all
This nationally known casual of genuine
moccasin construction is the most satis-
factory loafer made. Available for both
men and women.
For Men
All White Buck
Brown & White
Black Calf
Antique Brown
(with leather
or rubber soleY
$11.95 to $13.95
For Women
All over Antique Brown
Leather Sole Only
$11.50 a
Other Bass Outdoor styles . .
SMOKE ELK OXFORDS
SCOTCH GRAIN OXFORDS
SADDLE OXFORDS
CAMP MOCCASINS
Exclusive in Ann Arbor with
VAN BOVEN SHOES
in Nickels Arcade

4

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1

WELCOME
Ladies' and Children s
HAIR-STYLING
A SPECIALTY
Five courteous experienced
hair stylists to please you.
No appointments necessary.

S

The Daseola Barb
Liberty off State

'er

Daily Classifieds
Get Quick Results

j-Chronic asthma and bronchitis
Interest Clu s ' sufferers may find their vacuum
cleaner a big help to them in tak-
To H01 eetings ing their medicine, three Univer-
t-3 sity of Michigan doctors have dis-
covered.
The French Club and the Sail- If the vacuum cleaner has a
ing Club will hold their first or- blower exhaust, it can be easily
ganizational meetings today as and inexpensively rigged to an
the special interests clubs swing atomizing spray device which
into action for the summer ses- makes light work of daily home
sion. treatment, the doctors reported in
The French Club meet is sche- the Journal of the American Medi-
duled for 8 p.m. in the Hussey cal Association.
Rm. of the League. Officers for
the summer session will be elected
and Prof. Charles E. Koella, di - L r y Cu
rector of theaclub will speak on r y
the recent French elections.
The Sailing Club will hoist the Hours Due to
anchor with an organizational
meeting at 7:30 p.m. in 311 West
Engineering. The club, which I l l Budge
owns several small sailing craft
at nearby Whitmore Lake, has A drastic cut in library hours
planned sailing lessons as wellias during the summer to keep within
three regattas to be held during the University's straitened bud-
the summer. get has been announced by the
General Library.
The shortened hours, which
HEADQUAR TERS went into effect Monday;'affect
' both the Main Library and the
divisional libraries. The Main Li-
for your -brary will close at 6 p.m. Fridays
and at noon Saturdays. The clos-
R Ling time on week nights has been
changed from 10 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PRE-HOLIDAY=
Come Choose From Fashions For Your
Vacation ... For lott Weather ... For

EXTENSIVE RESEARCH re-
sults with various kinds of nebu-
lizer (fine spray) equipment are
described by Drs. JohnM. Sheldon,
Robert G. Lovell and Kenneth P.
Mathews of the Allergy Clinic at
University Hospital.
Usually, patients with chronic
chest and sinus infections must
take mouth sprays of penicillin,
streptomycin, adrenalin or other
prescribed drugs, about four
times a day.
The nebulizer can be hand oper-
ated, which is ofen exhausting for
the very sick person, or it can be
operated by a tank of compressed
oxygen but this is & rather expen-
sive mechanism for many persons,
THE DOCTORS discovered that
by using about ninety cents of
tubing, a gallon jug and a vacuum
cleaner with a blower exhaust, a
very effective arrangement for op-
erating a nebulizer could be pro-
vided.
Two strips of rubber tubing are
used in the set-up. One tube is
connected to the cleaner's exhaust
outlet and a gallon jug half-filled
with water. The other tube also
connects with the jug while its
other end is attached to the ne-
bulizer.
When the vacuum cleaner is
turned on, the blower forces air
through the tubes and up into the
compartment where the medicine
is contained.
Washington Firm
Wins Contract
The contract for the basic su-
perstructure of the Medical Re-
search Building has been given to
Jeffress-Dyer, Inc. of Washing-
ton, D.C.
Vice-President W. K. Pierpont
announced that work is to start
at once on the $2,343,000 contract,
which includes the main unit of
the building but does not provide
for the two wings which will house
the library and the auditorium.

4. 1

A QUIET PLACE TO DINE!
OPEN DAILY - (EXCEPT MONDAY)
4:00 P.M. - 1 :00A.M.
Quality Food -Courteously Served
SHORT ORDERS - COMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE
HARMONY RE STAURANT

I

Liberty at 4th Ave.

"Barney" Harkins, Owner

Cool weather . ..

For Seasons Ahead!

PORTABLE

Coats * Suits * Dresses
Skirts " Blouses * Hats

AT REDUCTIONS
TO

'2

MANY
BELOW

T h e circulation desk will
close at 6 p.m. Mondays through
Thursdays. After that time only
students and faculty members
with stack permits may receive
books from the stacks, though
all students will be able to. re-
turn or renew books.
Stack permits are available to
faculty members, PhD. candidates,
and a limited number of other
graduate students upon request to
Fred L. Dimock, chief circulation
librarian.
All divisional libraries will be
closed evenings and Saturdays.
The new schedule tentatively
applies only to the summer session,
though some of the restrictions
will probably have to be continued
in the fall,

SENSATIONAL

BaiN daliR
BARGAINS GALORE!

MONTHWEN D SALE- OF
SUMMER MERCHANDISE
REAL SAVINGS

k

*

*llE

*

SPRINGS
COATS
100% wool gabardines,
All lengths from shorties to full checks and flannels. Sizes
length. Fleeces, wool, suedes, 1-0ad1 22?2
gabardines and checks, Navy, 10-20 and 12%-24 %.
Red, Gold, Grey and Pastels. Originally 49.95 to 65
Originally to 59.95
$18 $25 $35 $25. 39.95
DRESSES SUITS
Silk prints, shantungs pnd ho-
nans-rayon prints-crepes and Silk and acetate, shan
sheers. Better cottons. Sizes fully lined . . . beautifull
9-15, 10-44 and 121/2-241/2. ored. Also rayon sharkski
Evening and dinner dresses in- linens. Sizes 9-15, 10-4
cluded in this group. 1 23
Originally to 35.00
9.98 12.95 18.00 12.95 18.0(
BLOUSES SIT
Odds and Ends. Rayon crepes
and cottons. Cottons, rayon gabardine
1.98 to 3.98 checks.
Silk Prints and Crepes Originally to 10.95
5.00
Originally to 10.95 2.95 to 5.0(
Sizes 32-44 and 121/2-24 %
GIRDLES BRAS
and Panty Girdles Close-Out Group
Originally 5.95 to 8.95 Originally 2.50 to 4.0

twills,
s 9-15,
5.00
5
tungs,
y tail-
ns and
0 and
0

RENTALS
on al makes of
Typewriters

47
Cotton Dresses
$5;88
Your choice of this entire
group, including chambray
and sheer. Sizes 9 to 15 and
10 to 18., Values to 12.95.

43 Cotton Skirts
$3.88
Included in this group are broad-
cloth, and butcher linen. Size 22
to 28. Values to 7.95.

121
Summer Blouses
$2.88
All types, casual, sleeveless
and off shoulder styles .. .
White and colors. Sizes 9
to 15 and 32 to 36. Values
to 5.95.

1-

I

A

m

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COTTON SOCKS
3 Pr. $1.09
White mercerized cotton with nylon reinforc-
ed heel and toe. Size 9 to 11. A 49c value.

I

Cotton or Rayon Briefs
2 Pr. $1.19
White only. Finest quality. Size small,
medium and large. 89c values

/

A'

SALE STARTS 9 A.M. THURSDAY
SENSATIONAL SHOE SALE

4

1!

s and
D

VALUES TO 12.95
Spring and Summer sandals,$
pumps, slings, platformers! ..
Many stylese suitable for Fall!
Linens, suede, calfs in all the
wanted colors . . now only

VALUES TO 9;95
Suedes, smooth leathers, pat-
ents, whites, navy blues, blacks,
reds, browns, greens, many
other colors! These prices can-
not be duplicated!

4J
&t

nationally advertised
Connie Lo-heeler
WHITE and
COLORS
.in suede and smooth
leathers! All sizes.
I55.88
SAVE UP TO $5.00 per pair in this timely value-event!

00

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