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August 02, 1951 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1951-08-02

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PAGE THREE

THURSDAY. AUGUST 2. 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

lA V1Y#'iYA y van va vr ai

Yankees Splt Two wTigers

KEIHE 2;ta zI

* * *

i

THE SPOT
By GEORGE FLINT
Daily Sports Editor

Major League
Standings

0UR special legman, Pandro S. Berman, returned puffing to this of-
fice the other day with a slight glaze over his powder-blue eyes.
He came to report on a dog show, the only one he'd ever been sent
to, and we print verbatim the slightly incoherent notes he presented,
with the odor of Pard still emanating from his dungarees.
* * *' *
ENTERED YOST Fieldhouse by usual way - noticed that most
people were entering by gate marked competitors only. Is it possible
all spectators at dog shows are also competitors? Fieldhouse floor was
marked off in four large squares. Could hear barking of dogs. Release
said 399 of 'em. I believe it.
Show sponsored by Huron Hills Kennel Club. Called a bench
show. Not sure why. Saw no benches. Dogs were cooped up in
little stalls except when being shown. Dogs ranged from Great
Danes and Norwegian Elkhounds to tiny Cairn Terriers and Chi-
huahas.
Four rings were used for parading dogs before judges. Judge in
ring one, short, stout man who seemed very warm, was named A. Rost.
Saw name on sign. He looked at dogs from a distance, then came up
close and looked at them some more. Judge also felt of dog's muscles-
most dogs did not object, being vain creatures, I guess.
* * * *
DOGS were shown by various kinds of people. Ladies looked strang-
est when showing dogs. Necessary to run around ring with dog on
leash beside them. Ladies generally not very good runners. Toyed
with idea of starting handicap for lady dog handlers-five furlongs,
probably. Decided against idea. Too hot.
Dogs divided into classes for showing. Puppy, novice, bred by ex-
hibitor, American-bred, open, winners. (Puppies were more interesting
than others.) Puppies were not too happy about whole thing. Some
puppies tried to bite judges. None succeeded. Judges evidently been
at game for some time.
COCKERS HAD largest entry list--41 of the little fellows. Cocker
puppies had trouble adopting approved stance. Dogs must keep front
legs nearly perpendicular to floor, back legs at about 45 degree angle.
Would have trouble adopting stance myself. Most. puppies seemed to
forget about stance after couple of seconds and look for other puppies.
Left before show was over. Don't know who won. Everyone
seemed to be getting ribbons. Guess all dogs more or less champions
in own way. Some got candy dishes along with ribbon. Had thought
dogs were not supposed to eat candy. Guess people who run dog shows
know best, though. Field house grew progressively hotter as show con-
tinued; doorkeeper was wiping brow as I passed him.
Didn't stop to interview any dogs. Most were looking delapidated
after long grind. One barked at me. Would like to try nice quiet
assignment next time, please.

AMERICAN
W
New York .... 60
Cleveland 59
Boston ........58
Chicago.......55
Detroit........44
Washington .. 44
Philadelphia . 39
St. Louis .... 31

LEAGUE
L Pet.
36 .625
39 .602
39 .598
45 .550
51 .463
54 .449
61 .390
65 .323

GB
2
7
15
17
23
29

YESTERDAY'S RESUTS
Detroit 9-6, New York 8-10.
Boston 5, St. Louis 1.
Chicago 4, Philadelphia 3.
Cleveland 8-3, Washington 6-4.
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at Boston (2).
Detroit at New York.
Cleveland at Washington (N).
Chicago at Philadelphia (N).

JOE DIMAGGIO
. . . clipping again

NATIONAL
W
Brooklyn......63
New York ...., 58
Philadelphia . 49
St. Louis .... 46
Boston ... 46
Cincinnati ..46
Chicago .......41
Pittsburgh ... 40

LEAGUE
L Pct.
33 .660
46 .558
51 .495
48 .486
49 .482
51 .472
53 .434
57 .409

GB
9
16
16%/
16
17 Y
21 Y-
232

YESTERDAY'S RESUTS
Cincinnati 1, Philadelphia 0.
Chicago 3-0, New York 2-2.
Pittsburgh 12, Brooklyn 9.
Boston 2, St. Louis 1.
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Pittsburgh.
Philadelphia at Cincinnati.
New York at Chicago.
Boston at St. Louis (N).
Police Watch
As Tam Opens
CHICAGO - (P) - Amid the
tramp-tramp-tramp of watchful
policemen, the $20,000 All-Amer-
ican golf meet will open today at
George S. May's Tam O'Shanter
course.
The three-in-one tourney-ac-
tually only a warm-up for promo-
ter May's $50,000 "world" champ-
ionship event next week-finds
Tam's traveling pro, Lloyd Man-
grum, and Slammin' Sammy
Snead scheduled to stroke with
alert gendarmes in their vicinity.
* * *
MANGRUM LAST weekend was
warned in an anonymous phone
call not to win the St. Paul Open
if he wanted to leave that city in
good health. The same gamblers,
or funsters-nobody is sure which
-told Snead it would be splendid
for him to win the tourney.
With a police-sprinkled gal-
lery, Mangrum won the St. Paul
meet by a stroke, while Snead
finished far back. Both left
town safely.
Both May and his employe,
Mangrum, thought it would be a
good idea to continue vigilance
against the unknown St. Paul
villains. So police from Niles, Ill.,
where Tam O'Shanter is located,
are expected to shadow Mangrum
and Snead while they roam the
fairways.
May, incidentally, will be the
subject of testimony Aug. 8 before
the grand jury by a former coun-
sel for the Kefauver crime com-
mittee concerning slot-machine
activity at Tam. George S. Robin-
son, former Kefauver aide, is ex-
pected to relate that May-told him
of warnings by sheriff's police of
slot-machine raids before they oc-
curred.

M inor League
Czar Defends
Farm System
WASHINGTON - (A') - Minor
league ruler George Trautman
yesterday defended baseball's use
of the "farm system" and "work-
ing agreements" between major
and minor league teams.
"There is room for both types
of operations," he told a Congres-
sional investigating committee.
.AND, IN response to questions
by Rep. McCulloch (R-Ohio),
Trautman said a prohibition of
either or both would be "detri-
mental" to organized baseball.
He also said minor leagues can-
not stand much tampering with
baseball's rules covering:
1. Territorial rights, which gives
a franchise owner the exclusive
right to baseball customers in a
given area; and
2. The reserve clause, by which
a player who signs a contract with
a team is thereby prevented from
dealing with any other club un-
less his contract is sold, traded or
torn up.
A lot of minor league clubs
are having a tough time of it
financially right now, Trautman
said, "and the territorial limit is
one of their chief supports."
He said, too ,that if the teams
don't have the protection of the
reserve clause those with limited
finances will be eliminated._
* *' *

nosoxBats
op Browns;
Chisox
DiMag, Bauer Star
In New York Victory
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-RP)-Hank Bauer
and Joe DiMaggio helped the New
York Yankees get an even break
yesterday with Detroit by winning
the second game, 10-6, after the
Tigers took the 9-8 opener on
George Kell's eighth-inning sin-
gle.
A ccwci of 31,101 saw the team,
tot-al 51 hits during the long loot
afternoon and early evening in
which Yankee Stadium lights were
turned on for the last four innings.
The Tigers bashed four Yank
pitchers for 13 hits in the opener.
And the Yanks ripped into Boh
Cain. Iih gil Trucks and Gene Bear-
cen for 1.4 in the finale, with Bauer
d11 ing in three anl DiMaggio two..
TED WILLIAMS and Vern ste-
ohens slgged successive home
runs after two were out in the first
inning and those were all the tall-
ie, ti(e Boston Red Sox needed to
defeat the St. Louis 3rwns 5-1
A small audience of 4,854 sat
in as the game was delayed twice,
by rain, 18 minutes at the start
and 54 minutes between the fifth
and sixth innings.
KEN EAFFENSBERGER pitched
four hit bill to defeat Philadelphia,
1 to 0.
It was his 11th victory of th1
season, against as many defeats.
Russ Meyer was the losing
pitcher, and it was a tough one for
him to trop.
Cinconsti scored in the sixth
inning on Johnny Wyrostek's sin-
gle and Ted Kluszewski's double.
Rookie Al Corwin huLrled a sev-
en-hit shutout as the New York
Giar cs came back to win the sec-
'nd 1-alf of a doubleheader from
the Ch'cago Cubs 2 to 0 after
dropping the opener 3 to 2 before
26,321.
Nelson Fox' double in the ninth
inning scored pitcher Billy Pierce
to give the Chicago White Sox a
4 to 3 victory over the Philadel-
phia Athletics before 4,662.
Pierce had singled and gone tc
second on Bob Dillinger's sacrifice.
Julio Moreno, Cuban righthand-
er who has won only four games

FOR SALE
D-FROSTO-MATIC ICE BOX DEFROS-
TERS-Originally $12.95. Now $4.00.
Brand new, guaranteed. )172
STUDENT-FACULTY SALE
Tinme.................$3 (reg. $6)
Life ......,.....$4 (reg. $6.75)
Fortune......... .$7.50 (reg. $12.50)
Building........$5.50 (reg. $11.00)
STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
330 Municipal Court Bldg., 2-8242
)165
MOTORCYCLE WINDSHIELDS--1 win-1
ter, 1 summer-$12. Phone 2-1014. )171
PRICES ROLLED BACK
Men's Seersucker Pants $2.00
Navy "T" Shirts 39c
Short Sleeve Sport Shirts $1.49
Rayon Swim Trunks $1.66
Open 'til 6 P.M.
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washtenaw )170"
TROPICAL FISH - Aquatic plants,
aquarium supplies. Sure there's a
place in Ann Arbor. Call 3-0224. )169
PARAKEETS, Canaries, and Finches-
New and used cages. 562 So. Seventh,
Phone 5330. )1641
FOR RENT
3-BEDROOM HOME-Completely fur-
nished, Aug. 18 to Sept. 18 while own-
ers are on vacation. Located between
campus and 'U' Hospital. Call 2-6654.
ROOMS FOR RENT
FOR MEN-Spacious, double, in beau-
tiful home. Shown before noon or
after 4 P.M., 1430 Cambridge. )84R
CAMPUS Tourist Home. Rooms by Day
or Week. Bath, Shower. Television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )IR
SHARE APARTMENT with Grad Stu-
dent. Save on meals $8 week. Big
yard, continuous hot water. Call
31791. )80R
MISCELLANEOUS
AT LIBERTY-German 11 and 12 in-
structor does tutoring and translation.
A. R. Neumann. 2-7909. )14M

ROOM AND BOARD 4
~OARD AT FRATERNITY HOUSE -
Short block from Law Quad, corner
Hill and Oakland. Eating schedule at
your convenience. Really good food.
Ph. 2-1634. 13X
TRANSPORTATION
COLORED WOMAN leaving for Pitts-
burg in new Plymouth about Aug. 5.
Would like companion. Call 2-0779
for informnation. )39'
WANTED-1 passenger to share driing,
no driving expenses, to Tucson, Ariz.
Leave Aug. 18. Phone 2-3241 and
leave number. }38T
BUSINESS SERVICES

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING WANTED-To do in my home.
Experienced. Ph. 7590. 830 S. Main.
)40B
HELP WANTED
GOLLEGE GIRLS-Permanent position
with national firm. Must be free to
travel. Excellent pay. References.
Transportation furnished. Apply Miss
Kathryn Harmon, Hotel Allenel, 7-9
p.m. only. )61H
STORE CLERK for Saturdays for Men's
Furnishing and Shoe Store. Prefer ex-
perienced man. Apply Sam's Store,
'122 E. Washington St. )60H1
WANTED TO BUY
WOMAN'ยง AND MAN'S ENG. BIKE. Call

WASHING, finished work, and hand 3-1511, ext. 2176 or 2-8732. )18X
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pilc-up USED ENGLISH THREE SPEED BIKE
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. We spe- in good condition. Call 2-8397 after
cialize in doing summer dresses. 6 p.m. )17X
ONLY 3 MORE NIGHTS
To see the DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH Production
" THE STREE TS OF NEW YORK"
Dion Boucicault's Extravagant Melodramo
Staged in nine scenes plus an exciting prologue
and numerous breath-taking tableaux?
STONIGHT through Saturday, Aug. 2-4, at 8 P.M.
Tickets: $1 .20-90c-60c (Tax Incl.)
Box Office Open Daily 10 A.M.-8 P.M.
INDIA MENDELSSOUN THEATRE

Ii,-

---

I

I

TONIGHT
THE
MAT ING SEASON
GENE TIERNEY
JOHN LUND
THE
HOUSE ACROSS
THE STREET
-_ Extra
Robinson-Turpin
Fight Pictures
Friday and Saturday
H SUANNAH
ROD CAMERON
QUICK SAND
MICKEY ROONEY

antd
Also Wedding Accessories
Napkins - Wedding Boxes and Matches
PRINTED AND ENGRAVED
EXCELLENT WORKMANSHIP - QUALITY PAPERS
VARIETY OF TYPE STYLES
1Eastnb-erty tre y ne.
119 East Liberty Street Phone 7900

DO YOU KNOW,... that the
Detroit Red Wings placed four
men on the six-man National
Hockey League all-star team last
winter, The players were goalie
Terry Sawchuk, defenseman Red
Kelly, and wings Gordie Howe
and Ted Lindsay.

xw
"What delicious mud pies. Does
my mother have the recipe?"
121.

Baseball May Get
Boss Tuesday
NEW YORK-(P) - Baseball's
search for a commissioner may
end at a meeting here next Tues-
day.
Complying with a directive from
the screening committee, all 16
big league club owners will meet
to discuss the naming of a succes-
sor to A. B.I Chandler. The office
has been vacant since July 15
when Chandler resigned after the
owners refused to renew his con-
tract. The pact was to have ex-
pired April 30, 1952.
A member of the committee,
who asked not to be identified,
said General Douglas A. MacAr-
thur "was among those high up
on the list."
"Mr. Gilese (Warren Giles, pre-
sident of the Cincinnati Reds)
proposed MacArthur's name as
commissioner," he said, "and
Webb was delegated to speak to
the general. I don't know what the
outcome of their talk was."

L. G. BALFOUR CO.
FRATERN ITY JEWELRY
CUPS AND TROPHIES
MICHIGAN SOUVENIRS
vO GIFTSv
SUMMER STORE HOURS - 12:30 till 5:00
Closed Saturdays
O "Home of the official Michigan Rings." U
a "
Co<--->o<---->o<---><-----><--->o<--->o<----t>< ><-> <-- 0<--o 0
r II

THE CONGRESSMEN, intent this season, victimized Cleveland
on soaking up quickly enough in- for the third time, 4-3, and en-
formation on baseball rules to abled Washington to split a twi-
-onsider bills to exempt the game light-night double-header with
from anti - trust laws, peppered the Indians. Cleveland won the
him with questions. first game, 8-6, with a three-run
rally with two out in the ninth
Someone wanted to know inning.
about the shifting of players by The last-place Pittsburgh Pir-
a parent club among its farm ates snapped the Brooklyn Dod-
clubs and asked if it were with- gers' 10-game winning streak, bat-
in the rules. tling from behind to cop a 12-9
Trautman said, yes, it is. victory from the National League
Then he was asked if such leaders. First baseman Gil Hodges
shifting were done because one of the Dodgers hit his 31st homer
farm city might have more cus- and Ralph Kiner of the Pirates
tomers than another, and if it was lamd isth. George Strick-
solely a profit-making scheme. land, Pirate shortstop also hom-
* * eredt.
TRAUTMIAN REPLIED that Some fast running by Sam
seays p better for one Jethroe and a wild throw by first-
smclub players pl another although the sacker Stan Musial helped the
class of the league is the same. Boston Braves stay in front for a
2 to 1 decision over the St. Louis
He added that he didn't be- Cardinals.
lieve it is "standard practice"
for a parent club to load up Walcott-Charles
some farm teams at the expense
of others although, as far as Return Delayed
the results are concerned, It
might work out that ways"
NEW YORK - (IP) - Jersey Joe
Rep. Keating (R-N.Y.) then said Walcott, 37-year-old heavyweight
he'd like to be straightened out boxing champion, will not defend
on the "option" business of base- his newly won title until after the
ball. "I don't believe I understand first of the year but his first op-
that," he said. ponent will be Ezzard Charles, the
So Trautman explained that a man he dethroned.
ball club can send some of its The date for the return bout will
players to a club in a lower classi- be set rby Norris under the agree-
fication, subject to being recalled ment.
within a specified time at its op- Eiocchicchio, previously, had said
tion. But the optioned players he would like Walcott to defend
have to be recalled before the end the title against Charles in June.
of the season or assigned outright The agreement shoved Joe Louis
to the lesser club or released al- out of the title uicture for the
together. time t e.ng at least.
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 44c to 6:30 P.M.

T14E IGGEST" US" IN C~i 'ETTE HISTORY,

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TODAY & FRIDAY

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PRESENTS
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MY LITTLE

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FOR THE FIRST WIE IN ITSi,:1
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THE CAMERA GOBS\
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' TWIT C

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