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July 12, 1950 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-07-12

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h;SDAYr,.m JU~.aurvLY 12, 19507;

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"ILLEGE ROUNDUP:
Economics Causes Uproar at Illinois,

Variations in Thematic
Poetry Pace Says Ciardi

PICTURE

NEWS

r 1

By PAULA STRAWHECKER
The question of academic free-
m and the shifted emphasis
an economics course have split
e campus of the University of
Inois and brought charges of
ross maladministration."
The issue has brought Dean Ho-
rd R. Bowen of the college of
mnmerce under fire from econo-
cs Prof. Donald L. Kemmerer.
KEMMERER HAS BEEN the
okesman for those in the com-
arce college charging that a
lation of academic freedom
ought about the resignation of
lph R. Blodgett, professor of
)nonmics.
A shift of emphasis from "free
iterprise" to "government con-
'ols and deficit spending" in
asic economics courses pre-
eded Blodgett's resignation,
e said.
Although Blodgett's supporters
arged that "staff members have
n chosen because of their ad-
rence to particular 'economic

theories," Dean, Bowen called this
allegation false.
* * *
THE BOARD of trustees accept-
ed a fact-finding group's report
that there had been no violation
of academic freedom, but that
there was "a failure in human
relations and a failure in admin-
istration."
Meanwhile Blodgett declared
that the question of academic
freedom was never his issue and
claimed that Dean Bowen had
selected it "because he was sure
he could beat it."
Kemmerer called for a meeting
of the executive committee of the
commerce college to poll its fac-
ulty members to determine if they
believed the "best interests of the
college were being served and its
present problems resolved" under
the present dean.
ALTHOUGH the committee de-
cided unanimously to poll staff
members on their confidence in
Dean Bowen, they deferred voting
until September.
Kemmerer charged that Bowen,

"must fear the octcome of the
poll, for he moved heaven and
earth to postpone it."
ON THE BRIGHTER side, Ma-
bel Fairchild, senior clerk in the
University of Minnesota, had an
interesting telephone conversation
at the university's information
service.
A woman explained that her
Georgie was registering as a
freshman at the university in
the fall. Did he have to attend
freshman orientation? Was it
compulsory?;
"Yes, it's compulsory," Mabel
told her.
"Well, is orientation anything
like this Greek Hell week?"
"Certainly not."
* * *
GEORGIE'S MOTHER had one
more question: "Why do they have
to wear moccasins to orientation?"
Mabel was temporarily silenced;
then she remembered, "The Moc-
casin is an orientation pamphlet.
It has nothing to do with shoes."

By MARY LETSIS
Thematic poetry is the wedding
of symbolism and free verse, as-
serted Prof. John Ciardi of the
Harvard University English De-
partment in his discussion on the-
matic poetry yesterday. -
"Symbolism is one aspect of the
matic poetry," he said, you could
call symbolism a something that
stands for something else'
THIS SYMBOLISM -ean be seen
in the poem, "The Second Com-
ing," by William Yeats in which
the poet tries to make some form
against the chaos. Mr. Yats be-
lieves that every 2,000 years the
world enters a new phase and that
Christianity was symbolic ir:d
was timed according to this phil-
osophy, Prof. Ciardi said.
"There are those who feel that
the subtle variations of structure
of form in poetry can exist only
about a norm, that a poem must
work within a pattern of form
Springer To Talk
On Germanic Text
Prof. Otto Springer, of the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, will ad-
dress the third weekly luncheon
conference of the Linguistic In-
stitute at 1 p.m. today in Rm. 3-R
of the Union.
His topic will be "The Oldest
Germanic Text."
Lecture on Motion
Of MusicToday
Prof. Ross Lee Finney of the
Music , School will- lecture on
"Music Moves in Time" at 4:15
p.m. today in the Architecture1
Auditorium.
,Prof. Finney's lecture is a part
of the program "Contemporary1
Arts in Society," being held dur-1
ing the summer by the Univer-7
sity.t

no matter how arbitrary, but there
is no reason why a norm can't be
the quality of a speaking voice in-
stead of an always regular pat-
tern," Prof. Ciardi declared.
It is apparent that English
poets use a different kind of
speech than American poets.
The result is two dividing forms
of poetry, he said.
A poem recreates the poet's
speaking voice and line breaks
have a great deal to do with the
rate and inflection of speech, Prof.
Ciardi continued.
* * *
"ROBERT FROST'S poetry de-
mands his twang or else.the effect
is lost and a skillful poet will place
a word at the beginning of line
for speech emphasis;" he said.
"Irregular line and heavy
rhyme can speed up the rate of
poetry. In thematic poetry, there
are a number of changes in
pace and the play of one term
element against the other," Prof.
Ciardi asserted.
Thematic poetry if properly em-
ployed can produce various re-
sults, he said.
"In the hand of a skilled mas-
ter, thematic poetry can achieve
a wide variety of metrical and
cadence effects," Prof. Ciardi con-
cluded.
Lippman To Talk
On Protest Plays
Prof. Monroe Lippman, presi-
dent of the American Educationai
Theatre Association, executive di-
rector of Le Petit Theatre du
Vieux Carre and chairman of Tu-
lane University's Department of
Theatre and Speech, will lecture
today on "American Protest Plays:
Pre-War and Post-War."
His lecture, which concludes
the graduate speech symposium,
will be presented at 3 p.m. in the
Rackham Amphitheatre and is
open to the public without charge.

F-OR 'T H I R D M A N '--Orson Welles (right) receives
the best foreign actor award from French Industry and Commerce
Ninister Jean Louvel, at presentation of French "Oscars" in Paris.

i
x,
r
i'

II.--
ia
1 £ LI '

AIR CANDIDATE-
Ruth Sutton, 22, is South Afri-
can Airways choice for "Miss
Airways 1950," international
airlines contest for hostesses at
London Airport, July 15.

MICHIGAN DAILY
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FOR SALE
ALL COLOR BABY PARAKEETS
Canaries. Bird supplies and c
562 Seventh, Ph. 5330.
FOR RENT
House For Ren
Small fraternity possibility. Lo
at 508 Elm Street; automatic
immediate possession. Call 717E
p.m.
ROOMS
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DOUBLE ROOM FOR GIRLS-Two1
two closets, cooking, between can
and hospitals. Third vacancyE
Ph. 2-2826.
MAN'S ROOM-For four hrs. work
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TWIN BED STUDY ROOM for
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LOST & FOUND

ST-$1.25. Because I did not obtain
iy subscription from the Student
'eriodical Agency. )2
ST-Wide silver wedding band, floral
Lesign with tiny sapphires and silver
ng with tragi-comc mask super-
nposed. Reward. Call D. Cammett,
-1561. )11L
ST-One silver-grey Parker "51" pen,
rroute from Angell Hall to Econ. to
eague. Ph. 25-9051. )9L
ST-On Friday, June 30 in Williams
t. Laundromat-Gold ring with Chi-
e letters. Extremely anxious to
a it returned. Reward. Ph. Jose
ornn, Music School. )2
ink FOR SALE
)IES BRITISH BICYCLE-Rudge, in
Ccellent condition with cyclometer
nd carrier. $40.00. Call 7174. )18
DERWOOD noiseless portable type-
riter. Perfect condition. Priced rea-
nable. Ph. 2-6136. )20
P SALE-1948 Red Plymouth con-
rtible. Good condition. Radio, heat-
r, $1100. Phone Ed, 8177 after 6. )19
MOTORCYCLE-Indian Chief, many
:tras, excellent condition, $450. Ph.
5264 evenings. )16
2 SALE OR RENT-Fraternity or
orority house. Will house 35 people.
st of campus. Ph. 2-0567. A. L.
LcDonald, Broker. ) 13

o
tii PERSONAL

is

GERMAN?!-Translating and tuto
0. Cassel, 921 Oakland, Ph. 3-0747.
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161
KIDDIE KARE-Reliable baby sit
Ph. 3-1121.
WANTED - Men to eat in frater
house this summer. 1319 Cambr
Rd. Rates very reasonable. Ph. 2-

SandA
cages.
)2B -
It
cated
heat,
6 6-7
)7R B
beds,
mpus
soon. H.
27F
per
8787.
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so a
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men.
nside
16F
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ring.
)18P
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tters.
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BUSINESS SERVICES
ACCURATE TYPING-Prompt service.
Ph. 2-9437. )16B
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist, at
308 S. State. Legal, Masters, Doctors
dissertations, etc. Call 2-2615 or
2-9848. )13
WASHING-Finish work and ironing
also. Rough dry and wet washing.
Free pick up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020.
)1B
HILDEGARDE SHOPPE-109 E. Wash-
ington. Custom Clothes and Altera-
tions. )3B
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Company,
215 E. Liberty. )4;
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
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WANTED TO RENT
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Full year occupancy. Preferably near
Hospital. Call Dr. Jacobson 2-9460. )1N
TRANSPORTATION
OMPANIONS WANTED-Driving Phil-
adelphia, leaving Fri. p.m., July 21.
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WANTED
Il
[OTEL CLERK - Wanted for extra
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OARDERS WANTED-Three excellent
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tenaw. )4X
REAL ESTATE
Y OWNER LEAVING CITY-Brock-
man District. 2012 Carhart. Artis-
tically decorated. Small house. 28 x
26 ft. Living room with fireplace, din-
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with Dishmaster. Bedrogm and bath
with shower on first floor. One Bed-
room on second floor. Spacious pine-
panelled recreation room with fire-
place and Heatolater, lavatory and
toilet. Automatic Heat. Garage 14 x
20. Lot size 66 x 132 ft. Well land-
scaped and shaded. Shown only by
appointment. Ph. 2-5659. ) lE

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the Universityy Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Officesof the
Summer Session, Room 3510 'Admin-
istration Building, by 3:0_ .p.m. on
the day preceding publicatrbn, (11:00
a.m. Saturdays).
WEDNESDAY, JULY12, .1950.
VOL. LX, No. 10-S
Notices
Preliminary Examinations in
English: Candidates for the Ph.D.
degree in English who expect to
take the preliminary examinations
this summer are requested to leave
their names with Dr. Ogden, 3230
Angell Hall, at once. The exam-
inations will be given as folly's:
English Literature to 1550, July
19; English Literature, 1550-1750,
July 22; English Literature, 1750-

1950, July 26; American Literature,
July 29. These examinations will
be given in Room 276 in the School
of Business Administration build-
ing from 9 a.m. to noon.
Graduate Students expecting to
receive the master's degree in Au-
gust, 1950, must file a diploma ap-
plication with the Recorder of" th6
Graduate School by Friday, July
14. A student will not be recom-
mended for a degree unless he has
filed formal application in the
office of the Graduate School.
The S. S. Kresge Company will
be interviewing students interest-
ed in their management training
program at the Bureau of Ap-
pointments on Tuesday, July 18.
Application blanksand booklets
may be obtained"at the Bureau.
(Continued on Page 3)

F I R E F I G H T E R S-Patricia Koltonski Lyon (left), of New
London, Conn.,, one-time fire chief of Emerson College, Boston,
demonstrates walkie-talkie to Virginia Kelly, of Danvers, Mass., at
New England Fire Chiefs conference, Wentworth-by-the-Sea, N.H.

BA RE CO MFOR T-
This one-shoulder slit decolle-
tage is a sun dress in pique
woven in a diamond pattern, ac-
cented by scattered rhinestones,
with a matching bolero.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I

R 0'0 T C A R V E R -- School teacher Hugh J. Dorsett, of
acksnville, Fla., who spends leisure time carving cypress tree
roots into weird primitive heads, is shown at work on his hobby.

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ENDS TODAY
A COLUMBiA PICTURtE
Pete Smith - News
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