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June 28, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-06-28

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WILL, BEN FEATURED:
Wide Variety of Plays
Scheduled for Summer

The visit of the Oxford Univer-
sity Players will headline the sum-
mer bill of plays with performan-
ces in two classics: "The Alchem-
ist" by Ben Jonson, and Shakes-
peare's "King Lear."
The distinguished British com-
pany is making its first tour and
will appear in Ann- Arbor July 27
and 28.
* * *
ANOTHER SPECIAL feature of
the summer production series will
be director Monroe Lippman, Exe-
cutive Director of Le Petit Thea-
tre du Vieux Carre, President of
the American Educational Theatre
Association and Chairman of the
Department of Theatre a n d
Speech at Tulane University.
"The Corn Is Green" will be
the first production, running
from July 5 through July 8. It
will be followed by "Antigone
and the Tyrant," a French im-
port by Jean Anouilh which will
run from July 12 through July
'5.

William Saroyan's "The Time of
Your Life" will be the next produc-
tion, from July 19 through July 22,
under the direction of Lippman.
. * *
FOLLOWING THE special per-
formance of the Oxford Players,
Humperdinck's opera "Hansel and
Gretel" will be presented by the
speech department in cooperation
with the School of Music, from
Aug. 2 through Aug. 5.
"The Great Adventure" adap-
ted by Arnold Bennett from his
novel "Buried Alive" is scheduled
as the final production to run
from Aug. 9 through Aug. 12.
All performances wil be held in
the Lydia Mendelsohn Theatre
and will begin promptly at 8 p.m.
Season tickets are on sale now
at the Lydia Mendelsohn box-of-
fice at $5.70, $4.50 and $3.30, ac-
cording to Ann Drew, publicity
manager. Single admissions will
go on sale Saturday.

Coon Opens
'U' Institute
Near East
America must pursue knowledge
of the Near Eastern peoples and
culture before undertaking any
Point Four technical assistance to
that area, Prof. Carleton S. Coon
of the University of Pennsylvania
said yesterday.
Prof. C o o n, internationally
known anthropologist, gave the
first of a series of lectures at the
opening of the University's In-
stitute of the Near East.
THE "understanding approach"
might not seem the most effi-
cient one, but it could mean the
difference between success and
failure of any Near East Aid, Prof.
Coon said.
"People in the countries get-
ting assistance would resent
our efforts as imperialistic if we
didn't get to know them first,"
he said.
"We must look at their prob-
lems from their point of view
and realize that these people have
lived closely together for centur-
ies and worked out a way of life
we must not upset," he added.
Prof. Coon lauded the efforts,
of the University to achieve an
understanding of the Near East
through the Institute. He pointed
out that the Near East is parti-
cularly important politically to
freedom-loving peoples as it is the
only area on the periphery of the
Soviet Union which has not yield-
ed territory.

Three concerts by the Stanley
Quartet, two piano recitals by
Willard MacGregor, and two re-
citals by University organist Ro-
bert Moehren will form the mu-
sical bill of fare presented by
faculty members of the School
of Music during the 1950 summer
session.
The Quartet, composed of Gil-
bert Ross and Emil Raab, violin,
Paul Doktor, viola, and Oliver
Edel, cello, will present its first
concert July 11.
* * *
THEIR PROGRAM includes
Mozart's Quartet in D, Quartet
in A minor by Ross Lee Finney,
and "Rasoumowsky" Quartet No.
1 by Beethoven. Finney is pro-
fessor of composition in the mu-
sic school.
On July 25 the quartet will

give the first public perfor-
mance of Quincy Porter's Quar-
tet No. 8, Divertimento in E
flat by Mozart and Beethoven's
"Rasoumowsky" Quartet No. 2.
The final concert, Aug. 8, will
feature the first performance of
the Piano Quintet by Alvin Etler,
with Benning Dexter as pianist.
Mozart's Quartet in D minor, and
"Rasoumowsky" Quartet No. 3 by
Beethoven will fill out the pro-
gram.
The concerts will be given in
Rackham Lecture Hall and will
begin promptly at 8:30 p.m.
* * *
MacGREGOR'S recitals will be
given July 18 and Aug. 1. The
first will include Variation "Come
un agnello" by Mozart, the French
Overture (Partita in B minor) by

Bach, three compositions by Bela
Bartok: the Ostinato, and From
the Diary of a Fly from "Mikro-
kosmoso," and fifteen Hungarian
Peasant Songs.
The program will continue
with Nocturne No. 13 by Faure,
Ravel's Gaspard de la nuit in-
cluding Londine, Le Gibet, and
Scarbo, and will conclude with
the Chromatic Fantasy and
Fugue by Bach.
His second will be an all-Cho-
pin program including the Scher-
zo in B minor, Etude Op. 10, No.
6, the Mazurkas in C ininor and
C-sharp minor, Scherzo in B-
flat minor, Sonata in B minor,
Barcarolle and 24 Preludes, Op.
28.
These programs will also be
presented in the Rarckham Lec-
ture Hall at 8:30 pn.
THE PROGRAM: for Robert
Noehren's first concert, July 9,
will include Prelvide and Fugue
in E major by Buxtehude; Trio-
Sonata No. 1 in E-flat major by
Bach; Kaminski's Toccatta on
the Chorale, "Wee shon leuchtet
uns der Morganstern," and three
chorales by Schroeder including
In Stiller Nacht, Christ ist er-
standen, and Schonster Herr Jesu.
The final three numbers of
the concert will be the world
premiere of Finney's Capriccio,
the Chorale on the Phrygian
Mode by Alain, and Messiaen's
Meditation for Ascension.
His final recital will be July
30, an all-Bach performance.
Both recitals will be given at
4:15 p.m. in Hill Auditorium.

FROM BACH TO FINNEY:
Summer To Be Filled with Music

4>

r

Three Dems, Five Rep ublicans
In Race for Washington Seat

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Read Daily,

Classifieds

11

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(Continued from Page 1)
vE~d successively as county clerk,
assistant prosecutor, and prose-
cutor of Jackson County.
State Rep. John W. Ban-
nasch, of Jackson.
Bannasch has been a member
of the State Legislatire since 19-
42 He is an attorney.
Henry C. Barnes, business-
man in Ann Arbor.
Barnes was defeated in a simi-
lar bid in 1948.
Philip C. Kelly, attorney in
Jackson.
In law practice in Jacksoa for
the past 22 years, Kelly was also
an unsuccessful candidate for the
Republican nomination two years
ago.
Harold L. Ward, '48, of Ann
Arbor.
A real estate salesman who also
operates a farm, Ward majored
in political science and economics
at the University. He is a life
member of the American Faim
Buyeau.
IN ADDITION, there is a defin-
ite possibility that George Mea-
der, former Washtenaw County
prosecutor, will enter the race
for the Republican nomination.
Mcader is now in Washing-

t

toil as chief counsel for a U.tS.
Senate committee investigating
t h e Eeconstruction Finance
Co-por ation.
But petitions for the Republi-
can ncinination here are being
c 1hulatEd by his friends, and pc-
litical observers think it is prob-
able he will run.
This Congressional district -
the Second in Michigan - com-
p r i s e s Washtenaw, Jackson,
Monroe, and Lenawee counties. It
includes the cities of Ann Arbor,
Jackson, Monroe, and Adrian.

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