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June 28, 1950 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-06-28

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w"- -

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 1950

a

feed Anti-Trust Laws
gainst Unions -Arniold

WAYNE LAUDS RUTHVEN.:
A lumni, Faculty,_Staff Get Honors

Back to Work

Anti-trust laws should be in-
voked against labor unions, for-
mer U.S. assistant attorney gen-
eral Thurman Arnold declared in
an interview at the University
yesterday.
Arnold, who is a participant in
the current institute on "The Law
and Labor - Management Rela-
tions," asserted that Taft-Hartley
Later Years
InstituteOpens
The University's third annual
institute on "Living in Later
Years" will open today and con-
tinue through Friday at the Rack-
ham Building.
The sessions, to be held through-
out today through Friday, will
feature sessions on Mental Health
and the Aging Population, Medical
Aspects of an Aging Population,
The Rewards and Penalties of
Growing Old and "Age Is Oppor-
tunity,"
The Board
tends to the men
of the Union C
League member;
to the building
This chan4

is a weak solution to the prob-
lem of nation-wide strikes. He
wondered which party is going to
make them an offense subject to
anti-trust action.
* * *
UNIONS SHOULD be subject
to anti-trust laws so far as they
use organized power to accom-
plish illegitimate objectives as was
the conspiracy of John L. Lewis
to restrain trade in coal, the for-
mer trustbuster said.
At the Institute's discussion
of the economic significance of
collective bargaining at yester-
day's session, Prof. Arthur Ross
of the University of California
asserted that collective bargain-
ing is a remarkablely flexible
mechanism for adjusting to the
stresses and strains of the em-
ployment relationships in the
ever-changing flux of a free
economy.
The Institute which will run
through July 1 continues today
with the subject being "The Vol-
untary Arbitration of Labor Dis-
putes."

Outstanding a 1 u m n i, faculty
members and non-academic staff
members of the University were
presented with honors ranging
from honorary degrees to achieve-
ment awards.
Vincent Gets
EnginePost
Appointment of Prof. Edward,
T. Vincent as chairman of the
mechanical engineering depart-
ment has been announced by Pro-
vost James P. Adams.
Prof. Vincent assumes the post
left vacant by the retirement on
furlough of Prof. Ransom S.
Hawley.
A specialist on the internal
combustion engine, Prof. Vincent
holds approximately 20 patents
for improvements connected with
Diesel engine injection systems
and other devices for internal
combustion engines. He is author
of four books and numerous tech-
nical papers.

President Alexander G. Ruthven
received an honorary Doctor of
Laws from Wayne University "for
his distinguished services to the
people of Michigan, his broad
views'of the place of higher edu-
cation in this State, and for his
influence for the improvement of
education and the extension of
educational opportunity."
DEAN IVAN CRAWFORD of the1
College of Engineering received the
Norlin Medal which is awarded
annually at graduation to a Co-
Prof. Cole Named
To Mills Position
Prof. Grover Cole of the archi-
lecture college has accepted .an
appointment as associate profes-
sor of ceramics at Mills College,
Oakland, Calif.
Cole, a native-Californian, came
to the University ten years ago,
when he received an appointment
as an instructor in ceramics.

rado alumnus for his distinguished
service.
Prof. Elizabeth Crosby, of the
anatomy department was given
the $2,500 Achievement Award
of the American Association of
University Women for her work
in neuro anatomy. This award
is one of twenty fellowships
awarded annually to outstand-
ing women students for gradu-
ate and post-graduate study.
Frank. X. Braun of the German
Department received a $1,000 hon-
orium called the Class of 1919
Award for his undergraduate
teaching.
Wilbur C. Bacon, president of
the Chicago University of Michi-
gan Club; H. Beach Carpenter,
former president of the New York
City alumni; Lucille Bailey Con-
ger; Christian F. Matthews, for-
mer Michigan Alumni Association
president; William C. Michaels,
Kansas City attorney; and Claire
M. Sanders, Detroit social worker
all received medals.
Service awards were presented
to 213 non-academic staff mem-
bers.

GRAVE SITUATION-President Truman is serious-faced as he
talks with newsmen about the Korean situation just before his
hurried departure from Missouri back to the White House. Tru-
man called the situation "dangerous."
Haven Hall Will Be Replaced
By $4,000,000 Angell Wingrs

I

,lit /taMt!
STUDENT OWNED
AND MANAGED ...

"We don't claim good food, low prices,
instantaneous service-WE PROVE IT!"

(Continued from Page 1)
feet of space. More than 67,000
square feet were lost in the Haven
Hall fire and buildings contain-
ing 100,000 square feet are to be
torn down to make room for the
new building.
* *' *'
THE PLANS for the new struc-
ture were originally drawn up in
1948 as part of a longe range
building program. But due to the
loss of Haven Hall the program
will go into operation immediate-
ly in modified form.
Briggs yesterday was not able
to give an exact date for advertis-
ing for bids on the addition be-
cause of the need to make archi-
tectural modifications first. How-
ever, Briggs said he expected
"about three" bids to be submitted
on the Haven Hall demolition pro-
ject. As yet there are no plans
for future construction on the
Haven Hall site.

HOURS-7:00 A.M. to 1:00 A.M.

The cause of the Haven Hall
blaze hasn't been determined
and probably never will be, ac-
cording to Ann Arbor Fire Chief
Benjamin Zahn.
It was thought at first that the
fire was caused by a smudge pot
which might have been left unex-
tinguished by Haven Hall work-
men. But after *an inspection of
the ruins the State Fire Marshall
declared that phis was highly un-
likely.
At the June 12 meeting with
the state legislators Vice-President
Briggs declared that the loss of
Haven Hall by fire should point a
warning to the dangers existing
in at least twelve other Univer-
sity buildings - Mason Hall, Uni-
versity Hall, South Wing, Barbour
and Waterman Gymnasiums, Eco-
nomics, West Physics, Pharmacol-
ogy, West Engineering Annex,
West Medical, Romance Langu-
ages and Tappan Hall, which
range in age from 49 to 109 years.

Regents Get
GiftsTotaling
$83,000
(Continued from Page 1)
He is a former member of the
College of Commerce, Ohio Uni-
versity.
* .k *
KENNETH M. CASE, formerly
of the Institute for Advanced
Study at Princeton, will be assis-
tant of physics.
Dr. Arthur L. Drew, Jr., was
named assistant professor of
neurology in the Medical School
and University IositaL . He
has been engaged in private
practice in New York.
Dr. Abraham I. Braude of the
University of Minnesota, will be
an assistant professor of internal
medicine in the Medical School
and University Hospital.
Winton H. Beaven, now on the'
faculty of Union College, Lincoln,
Neb., was appointed assistant
professor of speech for a three-
year term.
GCIFTS ACCEPTED by the Re-
gents included two $10,000 gifts,
one from George L. McKesson,
Toledo, to establish a fund for
Urological Research; and one
from the Viking Fund, Inc., New
York City, to aid the Central
Mississippi Valley Archaeological
Survey now being conducted un-
der the direction of Prof. James
B. Griffin, director of the Muse-
um of anthropology.
The Elsa U. Pardee Foundation
of Midland, Mich., donated $7,200
toward the Foundation's cancer
research fund.
ENDS TODAY
TE CMEY
,- TOAST OF
TE YEAR!
,
LNU
A TIST
CELESTE HOLM * VINCENT PRICE
Also
TOM & JERRY
-Thursday--
Ednd O'BRIEN
-RAI YUU~~ PII

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808 South State - Near Hill

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T IHIE

DIEPARTMIENT

OF

SIPEEClH

1m

1950 SUMMER SESSION OF PLAYS

11

THE CORN IS GREEN . . . . . . . July 5-8
by Emlyn Williams
ANTIGONE AND THE TYRANT . . . July 12-15
by Jean Anouilh
THE TIME OF YOUR LIFE . . . . July 19-22
by William Saroyan
HANSEC AND GRETFC . . . . .. August 2-5
by Humperdinck
in conjunction with the School of Music
THE GREAT ADVENTURE. . . . . August 9-12
by Arnold Bennett
All performances begin at 8 P.M.

COOL!

Continuous
From 1 P.M.

- Last Times Today -
andolph
Ruth Roman
Color by TECHNICOLOR *
- Starts Thursdoy -

r
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E
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SPECIAL PERFORTANCES
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PLAYERS

of Crooks
and Cutups p;
in the s
Plunder-
World!x

THE ALCHEMIST

* * Thursdlay, July 27

KING LEAR .

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Tickets $1.50 - 1.20 - 90c (Tax incl.)
(not included in Season Ticket)

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PAUL DOUGLAS
JEAN PETERS
JOAN DAVIS
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Buy Season Tickets Now!
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Single Ticket Sale Opens Saturday, July 1st
Admissions $1.20 - 90c - 60c (tax incl..)

f I'1

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