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July 06, 1950 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-07-06

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___.._ _THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURS

[IYGUISTIC INSTITUTE:

Prof. Bloch Defines Term'La

A language is a structural but
mutable system of traditional ha-
bits, common to a society, of res-
ponding to culturally classified
situations by vocal acts, either co-
vert or overt, used to induce vicar-
ious experience in the listener or
to evoke further response in those
who perform them and in other
members of the society who ob-
serve them."
This is the definition Prof. Ber-
nard Bloch of Yale University gave
to the elusive term which all lin-
guists have sought to define sat-
isfactorily.
* * *
SPEAKING TO the Linguistic
Institute yesterday, Prof. Bloch
declared it is almost impossible to

give a "dictionary" type definition cribe it o
to "language." One would do bet- word "tra
ter to characterize what language to indica
is, he said. impulsive

Criticizing earlier definitions
of language as being too vague
in certain terms, or being gen-
erally inadequate, Prof. Bloch
proposed his definition step-by-
step, showing how it was specific
and inclusive.
He stressed the importance of
such words as "structural," "tra-
ditional," "vocal" and "covert."
* * *
BY "STRUCTURAL" Prof. Bloch
meant a system which exists whe-
ther a linguist comes along to des-

CL s SI '! E[

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST & FOUND
LOST-Woman's grey full length coat
on Mon. in vicinity of E. Washington
St. Reward. Ph. Marie Roper, 3-1561.
LOST-Trench coat, on or near campus.
Putty colored. "Cravanetted" label
on inside. Reward. C-77, 3-4372. )7L
FOUND--Girls camping outfit in Au
Sable River. C. R. Lubite, 1357 Oak-
h~am, Willow Run, Ph. 2_404-W3. )6L
LOST-opal ring surrounded by da-
mond chips. Great sentimental value.
RewUrd. Marguerite Abrams, 1029
Vaughn St., Tel. 9244. )5L
LOST - On Friday in Williams St.
Laundromat-Gold ring with Chinese
letters. Extremely anxious to have it
returned. Reward. Ph.. Jose Borun,
Music School. ) 2
FOR RENT
GRADUATE STUDENT with apt. near
campus wants roommate. Perman-
ent. ph. - 9233. Al Eglash. )19F

FOR SALE
FOR SALE OR RENT-Fraternity or
Sorority house. Will house 35 people.
East of campus. Ph. 2-0567. A. L.
McDonald, Broker. )13
ROOMS
FOR RENT
MAN'S ROOM-For four hrs. work per
week. Close to campus. Ph. 2-8787.
)24F
APARTMENT for two men, also a
double room for summer. 1125 Mich-
igan. Mr. Briley, 3-1791. )23F
ROOMS FOR MEN-518 S. DIVISION.
)22F
% DOUBLE-Also single room. Student
or working man. Near campus and
Union. Shower, continuous hot water.
509 S. Divisionnear_Jefferson. )21F
NICE COOL, clean, well furnished room.
Reasonable for remainder of term.
1513 S. University. 3-4701. )20F
TWIN BED STUDY ROOM for men.
Private bath, near campus, inside
entrance.bPh. 2-0519 after 6. )16F
ATTRACTIVE ROOM-Private lavatory
and toilet, for professional or busi-
ness man. Private home in Washte-
naw area. Ph. 2-3868. )15F
THREE DOUBLE ROOMS for Fall. Very
close to campus $4, $4.50, $5.50 per
week. 412 Camden Court, Phone 7673.
)12
ROOM and BOARD
WOMEN STUDENTS - PERSONNEL -
Meals served Mon. thru. Fri., 119 Park
Terrace on Felch Park near Rackham.
Call 2-1017 8-noon or 4-6 p.m. )3X

PERSONAL

Poetry Can I
nguage Harvard ProJ
r not. He chose to use the "Reading poetry is not an or-
ditional" in his definition deal," Harvard Prof. John Ciardi,
te that language is non- '39 Grad., said yesterday.
but has to be learned by Speaking before a capacity au-
;on from his environment. dience in the Architecture Audi-
ecessary to use the desig- torium for the second lecture of
,ocal' to distinguish lan- the course in contemporary arts
om such other forms of in society, Ciardi said that too
systems such as writing, many people regard poetry in en-
als and the language of tirely the wrong manner.
Prof. Bloch explained. "Instead of merely reading
condary systems are de- poetry to derive pleasure from it,
n language." many people spoil the beauty of
pulating that language a poem by struggling to find all
covert as well as overt, sorts of subtle meanings," Ciardi
ch indicated that some- added.
guage goes on within one
thout a hearer. POETRY HAS PASSED from a
1 this 'thinking'," he said. process of inhalation to one of
excogitation," he lamented. Ex-
panding on this, Ciardi said that
the Italians never have to study
the opera, just as American young-
sters never have to study the ma-
jor league teams to know what's
going on in baseball.
--- "I regard poetry as a form of
D~Us human behavior," the poet de-
clared. It is regrettable that it
is in the process of becoming a
dead art.
TRANSPORTATION
-Driving up Friday noon. [DAILY OEHIC1
2.Ph. 2-1773 to share ride.
)2T
Publication in The Daily Official
H ELP Bulletin is constructive notice to all
HELPmembers of the University. Notices
WANTED for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Summer Session, Room 3510 Admin-
istration Building, by 3:00 p.m. on
--Secretaryparttime.Shor- the day preceding publication (11:00
e rapa rt time. Short- a.m. Saturdays).
mimeograph experience nec- am audy)
s to be arranged. Dr. Rector,
8. )2H THURSDAY, JULY 6, 1950
VOL. LX, No. 7-S
BUSINESS
SERVICES Notices
The Bureau of Appointments
DANCE CALLER-Equipped has had a personnel request for
size party. Bruce Edwards,
tate St. Ph. 5488. ) 15B an engineering draftsman for
ENT PERIODICAL AGENCY electronic equipment of aircraft.
E and LIFE to students and Very good drafting experience is
iembers at $4.75 a year. Phone Vr oddatn xeinei
_mr__4__yr_)2 essential. For further informa-
EIN-Experienced typist, at tion call at the Bureau. of Ap-
ate. Legal, Masters, Doctors
ons, etc. Call 2-2615 or pointments, 3528 Administration
)13 Building.
-Finish work and ironing
ugh dry and wet washing.
up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020. Bureau of Appointments will
DE SHOPPE-9 E. Wash- hold a meeting Thursday, July
Custom Clothes and Altera- 6 at 4 p.m. in Rm. 231 Angell Hall
'R typewriter repaired by the for those interested in registering
uipment Service Company, with both teaching and general
berty. )4 divisions of the Bureau.
ERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales & Service
ILLS-314 S. State St. )4B The Teachers' Oath will be ad-
NTED TO RENT ministered to all August candi-
R MEDICAL FRATERNITY- dates for the teacher's certificate
occupancy. Preferably near on Thursday and Friday, July 6
Call Dr. Jacobson 2-9460. )1N and 7, in Room 1437 U.E.S. This
SCELLANEOUS is a requirement for the teacher's
D VEG. ROUTE - Wanted certificate.
nan age 20-35 with person-
l business experience. Very
ortunity for a large weekly L cu e
ust have own delivery truck.
. information to, Wilbur L.
t No. 2, Watervliet, Michi- Public Polcy and Atomic Ener-
)1M gy. Lecture, "Administering the
Atomic Energy Program." Flet-
cher Waller, Director, Organiza-
tion and Personnel, U.S. Atomic
Energy Commission. 3-5 p.m., to-
day, East Conference.
Contemporary Arts and Society
Program. Lecture, 4:15 p.m., to-
day, Architecture Auditorium.
Summer Lecture Series. "The
Quest for Economic Security."
AIFSTARTS

. Admin. Bldg. TODAY
.M. Union
[UM
ough Saturday
from 1 P.M.
:A
ff starring

,
E
r
i

t"

e Enjoyable,
f. Ciardi Says

I

I tz

[AL BULLETIN

I

"The American Approach to So-
cial Security," Arthur J. Altmey-
er, Commissioner for Social Se-
curity, Federal Security Agency.
4:15 p.m. today, Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Linguistic Institute. "Accent and
Ictus in Spoken and Written Lat-
in." Professor Ernest Pulgram.
7:30 p.m., Aackham Amphitheater.
Dr. Leon Brillouin, director of
education for the International
Business Machines Corporation,
will give a lecture on "Statistical
Thermodynamics, in Relation to
the Theory of Information, as de-
veloped by C. E. Shannon and N.
Wiener," at 4 p.m., Thursday, July
6, in Rm. 1400, Chemistry Bldg.
Open to those interested.
"On Breaking Education Tradi-
tion," G. Max Wingo, Associate
Professor of Education and Coord-
inator of Directed Teaching in
Elementary Education, 3 p.m. to-
day, Auditorium, University High
School.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Leo
Francis Koch, Botany; thesis:
"The Distribution of Californian
Mosses," Friday, July 7, 1139 Na-
tural Science Bldg., at 9 a.m.
Chairman, W. C. Steere.
Concerts
Carillon Recital by Percival
Price, University Carillonneur, at
7:15 Thursday evening, July 6;
compositions by Handel, Denyn,
five Scotch airs, and Waltz, from
Tchaikowsky's Serenade, Op. 15.
Student Recital, auspices of the
School of Music. Charles Fisher,
pianist. 8:30 p.m., Rackham As-
sembly Hall, Thursday, July 6.
(Continued on Page 4)

i

"Why is it that many people
shy away from the reading of
poetry?" Ciardi asked. "One pos-
sible reason is that we now grow
up in a 'nuts and bolts world'
which inhibits the reading of
poetry."
ANOTHER possibility might be
that people feel poets are just too
abstruse, or not clear enough in
what they are saying. The trou-
ble here, Ciardi conjectured,
might be that there is "a buzzing
in the listener's ear, rather than
a frog in the speaker's throat."
To alleviate this possibility, and
to make the ieading of poetry more
enjoyable, Ciardi suggested sev-
eral rules that the reader observe:
stop trying to "cross-examine" the
poem; never read poetry as an
exercise in reading speed; read
it aloud; judge the poem by the
poet's intention; keep in mind
that poetry is sentiment, not
sentimentality; remember that
not agreeing with a poem does not
make it a bad one; and realize
that it is more beneficial to read
poetry than to judge it.

..
am

These are truly great values. Drop in and see
for yourself. Selection includes Cordavans,
Suedes and Calf . . . with leather crepe and
rubber soles. Styles for all your needs.

JUL

$500

S

NOTICE TO MEN WHO CAN WEAR
SIZES 7 and 71/2
JUST RECEIVED 159 PAIRS
OF NATIONALLY ADVERTISED
WINTHROP SHOES.

L

VALUES
TO $17.95

' .
" :.
,

X

,SIS619 E. Liberty

Ph. 2-0266

li

At OUR CAMPUS STORE ONLY

.~

}

FOR SALE

S RALEIGH-28-in., 3 speed shift,
t, good condition. $25. Ph. 6578.
)14
CIAL PURCHASE SALE-Nationally
dvertised Sport Shirts, long sleeves.
'iol mesh weave. $2.66 Asst'd colors.
open 'til 6 p.m. Sams Store, 122 E.
ashington. )5
.s COLOR BABY PARAKEETS and
anaries. Bird supplies and cages.
2 Seventh, Ph. 5330. )2B

THERE IS an advantage being a stu-
dent. Special student rates are offer-
ed at the STUDENT PERIODICAL
AGENCY. Call 2-8242. ) 2
WANTED .- Men to eat in fraternity
house this summer. 1319 Cambridge
Rd. Rates very reasonable. Ph. 2-8312.
) 14
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161 )1P
KIDDIE KARE-Reliable baby sitters.
Ph. 3-1121. )10B
THE STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
did not burn down. You can still get
your special rates by calling 2-8242. )2

JI'll

I

SAVEYO
If you averaged $2.00 pei
food last week, you waste

Art Cinema League and Inter-Arts Union
Present

ROBERT FLAHERITY'S

1..

"THE TITAN"
A study of Michael Angelo's Artistic Development
Narrated by FREDERIC MARCH

There

a re seven

weeks c

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Fri. & Sat., July 7, 8
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ADVANCE Thurs. & Fri.-1-4:30 P.M
SALE Thurs.-Sat., 1-6:00 P.

ARCHITECTURE AUDITORI
Admission ... 74 cents
A Contemporary Arts & Society Function

COOL!

MICHIGAN

TODAY thrc
Continuous

. ... 1

w ../ R 0

Join Club 211 To
3 £l'qua~e #(eaLip$*5
$.50
BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER
6 days a week

MILL.
1.00
r day for
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NOW!
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. . $9.00
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an ever-grow-
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6 days a week

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CLUB 211, organized and perpetuated by
ing group of hundreds of economy-minded
given its members appetizing, man-sized
lowest prices in AnrArbor.

f
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. _

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