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June 30, 1950 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-06-30

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'tiHMICHIGANDAILY _

Knock

off

Phillies,

3-2

7-MILLION-DOLLAR BABY:
Crisler Explains TV Ban to Publicists

WHO SAYS NO LIVELY BALL?

Giants Slap Brooks, 11-5;

Red Sox, Athletics Set Scoring Standard

Cubs Drop Cards Again

PHI ADELPHIA - (P) - Bos-
ton's run-whacky Red Sox out-
slugged the Philadelphia Ath-
letics 22 to 14 yesterday and the
two-team total of 36 established a
new American League record.
It was one of the weirdest base-
ball games ever played. By the
time the second inning had been
completed, 21 runs had been scor-
ed with the Red Sox in the lead
Y 4 to 7.
From then on, there was an un-
ending succession of base hits and
walks with nine pitchers giving
up 39 hits and 21 bases on balls.
Oddly enough, only one home
run was produced in the 2-hour
and 50-minute marathon. That
was by Ted Williams, who now
has smacked 24 four-baggers.
Williams drove in six runs to
hike his RBI total to 80 in 69
games.
It was Williams who broke the
old run making record by doubl-
ing in the ninth off Joe Coleman,
fifth Philadelphia Pitcher. That
swat drove in two runs.
The old standard of 35 runs in
a nine-inning game was set in
1901 by the same Red Sox and
Athletics. The Sox won that one
23-12.
4 * * *
WHITE SOX 7, TIGERS 3
DETROIT'-(A")-Lefthander Bob
Cain of the Chicago White Sox
settled down after a shaky first
inning yesterday to beat the De-

troit Tigers 7-3 and keep them
from increasing their four and a
half game American League lead.
The Tigers roughed up Cain for
two runs and four hits in that in-
itial inning, but could do little
against him the rest of the way.
The White Sox, in the meantime,
kept piling up their 14 hits off
Freddie Hutchinson and relief
pitcher Saul Rogovin. After De-
troit got off to a two run lead, the
White Sox moved out in front 3-2,
only to see the score tied at 3-all
in the seventh.
The Chicagoans broke loose af-
ter two were out in the eighth as
they banged out four singles good
for two runs and a 5-3 lead.
They ran the score to 7-3 in the
ninth as they mauled Hutchinson
and Rogovin.
That was all the help Cain need-
ed to get his fourth win as against
five losses. It was the fifth loss for
Hutchinson, who has won eight.
Gus Zernial and Alex Carrasquel
led the Chicago attack with three
hits apiece as the White Sox sal-
vaged their lone win in the finale
of the four-game series.
SENATORS 12, YANKEES 7
NEW YORK-()-The Wash-
ington Senators blasted three inef-
fective New York Yankee pitchers
for 18 hits yesterday and tdok the
rubber game of the series, 12-7.

Catcher Al Evans led the batter-
ing with four hits and Irv Noren
pumped a three-run homer as the
Nets scored six runs in the fourth
inning.
The loss was New York's sev-
enth in the past nine games and
cost them "their third successive
series.
Joe Ostrowski was kayoed in the
second and Tom Ferrick became
the losing pitcher when he was
unable to get a man out in the
fourth.
Tall Sid Hudson survived a five-
run barrage by the Yankees in the
first inning and went on to his
eighth victory against five losses.
* * *
INDIANS 4, BROWNS 1
ST. LOUIS-(P)-The Cleveland
Indians coasted to a 4-1 verdict
over the St. Louis Browns last
night behind the six-hit pitching
of Steve Gromek.
Wildness by pitcher Duane Pil-
lette opened the door for three
Students are reminded that
co-recreation will be held at the
Intramural Sports Building to-
night from 7:30 until 9:30 p.m.
Cleveland runs in the first inning.
The contest drew 4,027 fans.
Appearing nervous in his first
start of the season, Pillette walked
four batters in the first. That
spelled the difference.
A poor throw by Jim Delsing let
one of the runs in. Pillette walked
another across with the bases
loaded. Joe Gordon's outfield fly
accounted for the third.
In the second, the Indians pick-
ed up their fourth run on a double
by Bob Kennedy and a single by
Luke Easter.
CAMPUS
OPTICIANS
Conveniently Located
222 Nickels Arcade
Phone 2-9116

BOSTON - (A) - The Boston
Braves knocked the Philadelphia
whizz kids out of a temporary first
place tie with the Brooklyn Dodg-
ers last night as Vern Bickford
out-duelled lefty Kefi Heintzelman
for a 3-2 decision.
Buddy Kerr's two-run single set-
tled matters for the Tribesmen in
the eighth inning, despite the val-
iant efforts of the Phillies' Dick
Sisler, who banged out three doub-
les and a single in four trips.
Fleet Sam Jethroe, however, pro-
vided the 15,980 crowd with its
most exciting thrill while scoring
the first Boston tally in the sixth
inning.
That speedster reached first on
an error, stole second base, his
18th theft in 64 games, and then
raced home from there when Earl
Torgeson grounded out, first base-
man Eddie Waitkus.to Heintzel-
man who covered the base.
* * * '
GIANTS 11, DODGERS 5
BROOKLYN - (IP) - The New
York Giants snapped to life in the
last two innings yesterday, scoring
seven runs to trounce the Brook-
lyn Dodgers, 11-5.
Ralph Branca, who had pitched
three hitless innings of relief ball,
entered the eighth with a 5-4 lead
when he suddenly lost his stuff.
Branca walked Don Mueller and
granted a single to Monte Irvin
before Dan Bankhead was thrown
into the breech. Bankhead got off
to a brilliant start by inducing
pinch-hitter Roy Weatherly to
bounce into a double play. Bank-
head got two strikes on Bob
Thomson before grooving a pitch
that Thomson laced to left for a
run scoring double that tied the
score at 5-5.
A walk to Al Dark and single by
Hank Thompson finished Bank-
head. Erv Palica took over and
yielded two more hits before he
ended the four run inning. The
Giants slammed Al Epperly for
three insurance runs in the ninth.
* * *
CUBS 6, CARDS 1
CHICAGO - (AP) - Some choice
twirling gy Bob Rush and a solid
Chicago attack, including Hank

Sauer's 14th homer, swept the
Cubs to a 6-1 triumph over the St.
Louis Cardinals before 13,931 at
Wrigley -Field yesterday.
The triumph evened the series
and handed the Cardinals their
12th defeat in the last 16 games.
Rush notched his ninth victory
against six defeats-and his 10th
complete performance in 15 starts
- with a crisp five-hitter, his
fourth of the season.
The Bruins blasted Al Brazle off
the mound in the fifth after maul-
ing him for all six of their mark-
ers. Sauer's two-run homer in the
fourth proved the winning blow.
It followed Phil Cavarretta's sin-
gle.
Fred Martin succeeded Brazle
and held the Cubs to one hit the
rest of the way. The Cards' lone
tally came in the second on Bill
Howerton's triple and Harry Walk-
er's double.
The Cubs added a third run in
the fourth after Sauer's circuit
wallop and picked up three more
in the fifth on four hits and an in-
tentional walk.
'M'Nat ators
Selected on
All-Star lTeam'
Ten Michigan swimmers were
named to the all-star team se-
lected by the College Swimming
Coaches Association yesterday.
A committee of ten coaches,
headed by Scotty Little of Cornell
University, picked Gus Stager and
Matt Mann in both the 220 and
150-meter free styles; Charlie Moss
and Stew Elliott in the 100-yard
breast stroke; John Davies in the
200-yard breast stroke; Jim Hart-
man in the one-meter dive; George
Eyster in the three-meter dive and
Moss in the 150-yard individual
medley.,
The Wolverines landed Bernie
Kahn, Moss, and Dave Neisch in
the medley relay and Neisch, Dave
rittle, Mann and Stager in 400-
yard freestyle relay.
MAJOR LEAGUE
STANDINGS
AMERICAN LEAGUE

By B. S. BROWN
Live TV of the Western Con-
ference football games was given
the heave-ho by the Big Ten a
short while back.
And yesterday afternoon, H. 0.
(Fritz) Crisler, Michigan athletic
director, told why.
IN EFFECT answering the cri-
tics-and there have been many-
of the action, the former Wolver-
ine gridiron mentor explained that
the loss in revenue which was a
distinct possibility necessitated the
action.
Speaking before a conference
of the American College Public
Relations Association at a
luncheon in the Michigan Un-
ion, Crisler maintained that a
constant peak revenue was ne-
cessary if athletic departments,
such as Michigan's, were to ful-
fill their obligations to the stu-
dents.
"The development of the stu-
dents of an educational institu-
tion is one of the most important
functions of a university," Crisler
said.
* * *
"IT IS THROUGH the engaging
in sports that the individual gains
emotional stability, which is so
important in guiding his life.
"If the end results we turn
out in athletics . .. give freely
and unselfishly, they are the
greatest ambassadors of public
relations," he added.
Insofar as television is concern-

* * *

NI

ed, Crisler said, "We must never
lose, sight of our responsibility to
the students-we must be able to
underwrite athletic programs for
them;.. and the cost is tremen-
dous."

"WE ALSO recognize our re-
sponsibility to the public," he said.
The famed coach of Michigan's
1947-48 Western Conference and
Rose Bowl cahmpions admitted
that it was still difficult to deter-
mine whether TV would increase
or decrease attendance, but main-
tained that the Conference had
taken action which it believed to
be in the best interests of the sut-
dent.
"We have a 7 million dollar
athletic plant here at Michigan:
that plant has been given to the
University without funds from
the Legislature or the taxpayer,
and it is one of the largest gifts
to the University.
"We are going to put 6 million
dollars more into athletic pro-
grams," he declared.
THOUGH HE has been publicly
criticized, along with the other
athletic directors of the Big Ten,
for the ban, Crisler maintained, in
conclusion, "In the field of pub-
lic relations, our first responsibil-
ity is to the students."
* * *4*
Interview.. .
Plans for a new women's athle-
tic guilding and a new sports

building to replace the I-M struc-
ture are in the preliminary stages,
H. O. Crisler said in an interview
yesterday.
The Michigan. athletic director
also revealed that additional ten-
nis courts would be built in the
immediate area of the ice rink, on
the site of the veterans' housing
project, as soon as the emergency
dwellings are abandoned.
Crisler commented that he had
originally hoped to build a tennis
pavilion, but added that the ice
rink would serve the same purpose
under the new plan.
Jones Leads
Keystoners
In All-Star .Poll
CHICAGO-(P)--Willie Edward
Jones of the Philadelphia Phillies
may be another new starter in the
17th annual all-star baseball game
at Chicago's Comiskey Park, July
11.
Jones, who answers quickly to
the nickname of "Puddin' Head,"
is drawing away from his National
League rivals for the third base
spot in the national poll to pick
the fans' opening line-ups for the
inter-league contest. The 20 day
balloting being conducted by 287
newspapers and radio stations will
end at midnight Saturday.

_.___._
f '-4 ^ .
" flU

.. i

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.

ROOMS FOR RENT
ARE YOU LOOKING for a large, nicely
furnished, cool, comfortable room
for summer? Ph. 3-1937. ) 17F
SPACIOUS COOL ROOMS for Summer
session, four blocks from campus.
Semi-private baths with showers.
Cooking, laundry privileges, inner-
springs. 415 Lawrence. )13
THREE DOUBLE ROOMS for Fall. Very
close to campus $4, $4.50, $5.50 per
week. 412 Camden Court, Phone 7673.
)12
PERSONAL
IF THE GIRL to whom I pointed out
the rear door to Angell Hall last
week, the one who was a little an-
noyed at displaying unfamiliarity with
the campus, would like to see a few
other places in and around Ann Ar-
bor, I'd like the occupation of show-
ing her. Box 223. )15P
WANTED - Men to eat in fraternity
house this summer. 1319 Cambridge
Rd. Rates very reasonable. Ph. 2-8312.
) 14
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist, at
308 S. State. Legal, Masters, Doctors
dissertations, etc. Call 2-2615 or
2-9848. )13

BUSINESS SERVICES
ALL COLORED BABY PARAKEE and
Canaries. Bird sup plies and -cages.
562 Seventh, Ph. 5330. )2B
WANT SINGING LESSONS?-Conserva-
tory trained singer recently of U. of
M. staff available for private instruc-
tion. Leslie Eitzen,-_Ypsi 792W. )13
WASHING-Finish work and ironing
also. Rough dry and wet washing.
Free pick up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020.
)1B
HILDEGARDE SHOPPF-109 E. Wash-
ington. Custom Clothes and Altera-
tions. )3B
THE STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
offers special rates to STUDENTS and
FACULTY members for TIME, LIFE
and other magazines. Phone 2-8242.
)2
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment ┬░Service Company,
215 E. Liberty. )4
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales & Service
MORRILLS-314 S. State St. )4B
WANTED TO RENT
HOUSE FOR MEDICAL FRATERNITY--
Full year occupancy. Preferably'YneaN
Hospital._Call Dr. Jacobson 2-940 N
WANTED
RIDERS WHO LIKE GOOD HORSES-
Only good riders and those desiring
to learn need apply. Glencoe Hills
Riding Stable. 4255 Washtenaw, Ph.
28834. )1A

.,,,, LOST

4th of July Hours - 10 A.M. to 5 P.M.
Parking problems are completely
eliminated when you drive
into

& FOUND

BEER

Detroit
New York
Cleveland
Boston
Washington
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia

W
43
40
38
39
30
28
21
22

L
20
26
27
30
35
37
42
44

Pet.
.683
.606
.585
.565
.464
.431
.333
.333

GB
6
'7'
14
16
22
221/

DRIVE THROUGH.
SBEER * WINE * SOFT DRINKS
E. Williams Phone 7191
Open daily 10 A.M.-10 P.M. Sundays noon to 7 P.M.

TODAY'S

GAMES

New York at Boston (2) (Day
and night) - Raschi (8-5) and
Lopat (9-4) vs. Masterson (2-3)
and Dobson (9-6).
Philadelphia at Washington (2)
(twi-night) - Kellner (4-7) and
Hooper (7-4) or Scheib (1-5) vs.
Marrero (4-3) and Consuegra (3-
0).,
Detroit at Cleveland (N) -
Newhouser (6-4) vs. Garcia (5-4).
St. Louis at Chicago (N) -
Garver (6-6) vs. Wight (6-8).

LOST-Tuesday Evening-Diamond ring
setting in Hill Aud. or betweenAud.
and Dental Bldg. Reward. Ph 2-1032.
)3L
LOST - On Friday in Williams St.
Laundromat-Gold ring with Chinese
letters. Extremely anxious to have it.
returned. Reward. Ph. Jose Bornn,
Music School. )2
LOST-Argus G-3 in brown leather case.
About June 12 within the Arboretum.
Reward. Box 222.)1
FOR SALE
FOR SALE OR RENT-Fraternity or
Sorority house. Will house 35 people.
East of campus. Ph. 2-0567. A. L.
McDonald, Broker. )13
SHORT SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS, 2 for
$3.00; Nay "T" Shirts-45c; wash pants
-$2.99; wool swim trunks-$1.49. Open
'til 6 p.m. Sams Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington. )5
Cousins on State Street
Featuring Genuine LEVI'S - $3.95
Companion Plaid Levi Shirts
$2.95 and $3.95 )
FOR RENT
FOUR ROOM basement apartment to
rent furnished till Sept. 1st only.
927 Forest. )3
MODERN, QUIET unfurnished apart-
ment near Stadium. Suitable for one
or two adults. Ph. 6197 after 5:30. )2
2-ROOM SUITES-Living and sleeping
separate. Spacious, cross-ventilation,
linen, cleaning included. Newly re-
decorated. $5 weekly if two men, $8
singly. One block from Rackham,
1034 East Huron, Ph. 2-8754. )1
ROOMS
FOR RENT
UNFURNISHED APARTMENT-2rrooms
until Sept. 1, near campus, reason-
able. Call Jim Wright, 2-9431. )18F
TWIN BED STUDY ROOM for men.
Private bath, near campus, inside
entrance. Ph. 2-0519 after 6. )16F
ATTRACTIVE ROOM-Private lavatory
and toilet, for professional or, busi-
ness man. Private home in Washte-
naw area. Ph. 2-3868. )1F
SINGLE FOR MEN - Near campus.
Shower, use of refrigerator, $4 per
week. Ph. 5750.y s )14F
Read Daily Classifieds,

LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
20oe 161te

Phone 8161 )1P
THE STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
did not burn down. You can still get
your special rates by calling 2-8242. )2
KIDDIE KARE-Reliable baby sitters.
Ph. 3-1121. )10B
ROOM and BOARD
WOMEN STUDENTS - PERSONNEL -
Meals served Mon. thru. Fri., 119 Park
Terrace on Felch Park near Rackham.
Call 2-1017 8-noon or 4-6 p.m. )3X
ROOM WITH BOARD-Also board with-
out room. 2 meals per day, home
cooking. 1319 Hill.)2
BOARD FOR LESS than $7.00 per week.
Rooming vacancies also available.
Apply at Robt. Owen Co-op House.
1017 Oakland.. Ph. 7211. )

..Welcome to
.,. .
0J Michigan 0
We specialize in ^
Short CutsO
" Personality Styles
for your comfort
Fan-cooled Shop
" No Waiting
Th 7Barbers
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State

-. -

1/goAh jug Coffee LAop

,l

NATIONAL
W
Brooklyn 35
Philadelphia 35
St. Louis 36
Bostqn 34,
Chicago 31
New York 31
Pittsburgh 23
Cincinnati 20

LEAGUE
L Pct.
25 .583
26 .574
27 .571
28 .548
29 .517
30 .508
39 .371
41 .328

GB
1/
2
4
4
13
15

1204 South University
serving
BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS and DINNERS
SANDWICHE, and SALADS
from
7:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. and 5:00 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Closed Sundays

CLASSES FORMING
Regular and Special
Business Courses
Secretarial, Accounting,
Machine Shorthand.

I

TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at New York (N) -
Hall (0-1) vs. Kennedy (3-3).
Brooklyn at Philadelphia (N) -
Newcombe (7-2) vs. Roberts (9-
3).
Chicago at Cincinnati (N) -
Schmitz (8-3) vs. Raffensberger
(5-9).
Pittsburgh at St. Louis (N) -
Chambers (8-6) vs. Staley (6-5).

wmllp

Finishing Course for
Commercial Students.

RELAX

I

Pre-College Typewriting
and Shorthand.
Typing for Younger Boys
and Girls
Get a head start on a career
course, or take an intensive
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vacation weeks.
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395

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