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August 12, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-08-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Ti! ni iitAN i7HRui

Biekford Pitches No-Hitter; Shuts-out Doc

gers, 7-0

Americans Tigers Drop Nightcap,
Win Swedish After Winning Onener

i V

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Major League Standings

* * *

* * *

Tr ack Meet -O~ h gn ye
T rac -M e t BSTO (A RigthaderVern Bickford, who originally be-
came Boston property on the suc-
GOTEBORG Sweden - (W) - cessful toss of a coin, last night
American athletes last night swept achieved baseball immortality by
seven events on the second final pitching a no hitter as the Braves
program of an international track shut out the Brooklyn Dodgers 7-0.
meet. Bickford struck out three Dodg-
Herb McKenley of Jamaica ers and walked four, the only men
again won a close decision over to reach base.
George Rhoden: of Morgan State Only three Brooklyn base run-
in the 400 meter run with a clock- ners were left on base.
f 66:-* * *
ing of ..- . . THE NO-RUN, no-hit game was
That it was a hairline victory is the first in the majors since
evidenced by'" the fact that both Brooklyn's Rex Barney shut out
were credited with the same time. ok R-x Bey s out
The 1,000 meters was taken by New York, 2-0, Sept. 9, 1948.
Warren Drefltzler of Michigan It was the first at Braves
State in 2:25.4. Field since Jim Tobin of the
Tribe blanked Brooklyn, 2-0,
April 27, 1944.
-- I In five innings Bickford retired
the Brooks in order.
s* * *
us THERE WERE three better than
-~usual plays behind him as the
29,008 crowd - third largest of
the Braves' home season - cheer-
ed every out from the fifth frame
on.
Only one of them got to second
base - pinch hitter Jim Russell
who walked as lead off batter in
the ninth. He moved up, with
one out, on a base on balls to Gene
Let's sad',some/h U Hermanski- *
Grandma will take is to the ST. LOUIS--(P)--Outfielder Ken
Allenel Dining Room for Wood's throwing arm choked off
dinner." two consecutive runners at home
plate in the second game of a twi-
T E A LLEN EL night doubleheader last night, giv-
ing the Browns a 2-1 victory over
126 Last Huron Detroit after dropping the opener,
E _ 4-3, in ten innings.

' v v a.i : v a.i s
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7
I

Don Lenhardt lost the first game
for St. Louis on an error but re-
deemed himself by driving in both
Brownie runs in the finale.
* . *
INDIANS 3, WHITE SOX 2
CHICAGO-(,?)- Shortstop Ray
Boone's ninth inning single scored
Allie Clark with the winning run
as Cleveland's second place In-
dians defeated the Chicago White
Sox, 3-2, in a series opener before
6,554 persons here yesterday.
YANKEES 7, A's 6
NEW YORK-R)-Cliff Mapes,
subbing for Joe DiMaggio, clubbed
a 400-foot home run into the
right-centerfield stands in the sev-
enth inning last night to give the
New York Yankees a 7-6 victory
over the Philadelphia Athletics be-
fore 27,002.
* * * *
SENATORS 5, BOSOX 2
WASHINGTON -(A)- Sandalio
Consuegra stopped the Red Sox on
six hits last night as Washington
made the most of its eight hits off
Ellis Kinder to defeat Boston, 5-2.
Gil Coan led the Senators' at-
tack with a triple, double and sin-
gle.
GIANTS 3, PHILLIES 1
PHILADELPHIA-(P)-Al Dark's
two-run homer and an inning of
wildness by southpaw Curt Sim-
mons carried the New York Giants
to a 3-1 victory over the league
leading Philadelphia Phillies last
night and squared the four-game
series at one each._
REDS 5, CARDS 2
CINCINNATI-A)--Ewell Black-
well clipped the wings of the St.
Louis Cardinals with a four-hitter
last night as Cincinnati's Reds
scored a 5-2 victory in a sloppily
played game.
Hulking Ted Kluszewski helped
Blackie to his 12th victory by
banging out two doubles and a
single.
* * *
CUBS 3, BUCS 1
PITTSBURGH-(A)-The Chica-
go Cubs squared their series with
the Pittsburgh Pirates at a game
apiece last night as Frank Hiller
pitched them to a 3-1 triumph
over the last place Bucs before a
crowd of 11,082.

AMERICAN
Detroit 67
Cleveland 65
New York 64
Boston 61
Washington 47
Chicago 42
Philadelphia 39
St. Louis 38

LEAGUE
L Pct.
37 .646
41 .614
41 .610
47 .566
56 .455
67 .384
67 .366
67 .358

GB
3
8
19%
27
291
29Wi
White

NATIONAL
W
Philadelphia 66
Boston 59
Brooklyn 55
St. Louis 57
New York 54
Chicago 44
Cincinnati 44
Pittsburgh 35
* *
TODAY'S

LEAGUE
L Pet.
43 .606
46 .562
45 .551
47 .548
49 .524
58 .430
58 .430
68 .338
Ga
GAMES

GB
5
6%/
6%2
9
18% '
181/
28

Ransom Takes Halfway
Lead at Tarn with 139

TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at St. Louis -
(3-4) vs. Marshall (1-2)

The Clipper
Benched by

I

I

Philadelphia at New York -
Scheib (3-7) or Shantz (6-10) vs.
Reynolds (9-10).
Boston at Washington (night)
- Dobson (12-8) vs. Hudson (10-
9).
Cleveland at Chicago - Zoldak
(4-2) vs. Judson (2-2).

Brooklyn at Boston (night) -
Branca (5-6) or Newcombe (11-7)
vs. Spahn (14-12).
New York at Philadelphia -
Hearn (3-2) or Jones (9-12) vs.
Johnson (4-0).
St. Louis at Cincinnati (night)
- Boyer (5-2) or Staley (10-9)
vs. Wehmeier (9-12)
Chicago at Pittburgh - Minner
(5-7) vs. MacDonald (5-4).

CHICAGO-(P)-Henry R a n-
som, a transplanted Texan who
has won only two titles in 13 years
of campaigning, shot to the front
in the $49,000 Tam O'Shanter
"world" golf meet yesterday with
a halfway total of 139, five under
par.
The 39-year-old pro, who start-
ed out at Houston and now regis-
ters from Chicago, peeled off a 33
with the help of two 15 foot birdie
putts on Tam's front nine yester-
day. Then he matched par 36 for
69.
* * *
A TRAP and a fluffed drive
made him forfeit two pars on the
back trip, nullifying a pair of bir-
dies.

Two strokes back of Ransom
in the hustle for golf's richest
first prize - $11,000 - was the
1950 champion, Chandler Har-
per.
The likeable Portsmouth, Va.,
star coupled 34-36-70 for the
second round. He wound up with
a disastrous two-over 6 on the last
hole after hitting in front of the
green and then ultimately missing
a five foot putt.
* * *
RANSOM'S RISE in the race
after an opening 70 over the par
72 playground came as no surprise.
He was in a four-way tie for the
first round lead and was elated by.
an early morning ruling that all
first round scores would stand.

College All-Stars Lead All
The Way; Upset Eagles17-

7

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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1 ' Z Vt 111 Wll 111111aabA,)f

CHICAGO-(1)-A fired aggre-
gation of College Football All-
Stars last night scored a stunning
upset, defeating the Philadelphia
Eagles, 17-7.
hTe surprising victory over the
defending champions of the Na-
tional Football League, favored by
1412 points, was scored in flood-
lighted Soldier Field before a
thrilled crowd of 88,885 spectators.
It soothed the 38-0 shellacking the
Eagles registered over the Col-
legians a year ago.
NORTH CAROLINA'S famed
Charlie "Choo-Choo" Justice, 1949
All-America halfback, led a de-
vastating All-Star attack that
pummeled the stubborn Eagles
into submission.
Justice scored the decisive
second All-Star touchdown in
the second period on a 35-yard
run after snatching a pass from
another of the game's heroes,
little Eddie Le Baron of College
of Pacific.
Justice was as slipperly as an
eel all evening, escaping . the
clutches of the Eagles for stand-
out runs of 47, 31, 28, and 12
yards. In all, he gained 133 yards
in nine attempts.
x : *$
WITH 20-YEAR-OLD Le Baron

at the helm as quarterback, the
All-Stars struck for an opening
period touchdown on a 54-yard
march in only seven plays.
Ralph Pasquariello, Villanova
plunger, barreled over from the
one-yard line for the touch-
down. Gordon Soltau, Minne-
sota place-kicking end, then
added the first of his two con-
versions.
Soltau buttoned up the game
with a 24-yard field goal in the
last period, just after the Eagles
struck for their only touchdown
on a one-yard smash by Steve
Van Buren. Cliff Patton's extra
point ended the professional
champions' scoring.
It was Justice's flashy running
which paved the way for the first
All-Star touchdown. He reeled off
dashes of 31 and 12 yards in that
march to put the ball on the Ea-
gle's five. Three plays later came
Pasquariello's scoring plunge.
The second period All-Star
touchdown was a beautiful exam-
ple of Le Baron's tricky maneu-
vering which bewildered the Ea-
gles all evening.
Apparently trapped twice by
huge pro tacklers, Le Baron
wriggled free each time and then
spotted Justice wide open on the
scrimmage line.

ABBOTT & COSTELLO
in"fC
"Here, Come The Coeds"

THE BEST FOR LESS
TODAY
and Sunday

(Continued from Page 2)
the Accuracy of Understanding
Personality," Monday, August 14,
East Council Room, Rackham
Bldg., at 1 p.m. Chairman, Max
Hutt.
Doctoral Examination for Jacob
Myer Geist, Chemical-Engineering.
Thesis: "An Electronic Spray Ana-
lyzer for Electrically Conducting
particles." Monday, August 14, 32-
01 East Engineering Building, at
2 p.m. Chairman, G. G. Brown.
Doctoral Examination for Jacob
Eichhorn, Chemical Engineering.
Thesis: "Heat Transfer and Pres-
sure Drop in Systems of Gasses
and Solids in Fixed and Fluidized
Beds." Thursday, August 17. East
Council Room, Rackham Building,
at 7 p.m. Chairman, R. R. White.
Doctoral Examination for Seyn
mour Lewin, Chemistry, thesis.
"The Diethyl Bromoethylmalon-
ates as Evidence of the Existance
of Alternate Polarities in Satur-
ated Carbon Change." Tuesday,
August 15, West Council room,
Rackham Building, 2 p.m. Chair-
man, K. Fajans.
Concerts
Student Recital Postponed: The
recital previously announced for
Monday evening, August 14, by
Joyce Heeney, Organist, in Hill
Auditorium, has been postponed.
The exact date will be announced
in the fall.

i
r ,

25c Matinees
until 5
35c Nights
and Sundays

JON HALL ! MARIA MONTEZ
in
"Ali Baba and The 40 Thieves"
In Color

Oratorio Class under the direc-
tion of Harold Haugh will perform
Mendelssohn's "Elijah," at 8:30
Wednesday evening, August 16, in
Hill Auditorium. It will be open
to the general public.
Exhibitions
General Library, main lobby
cases. "Trochiledae, Famnily of
Humming Birds," by John Gould,
supplement, 1887. (July 27-August
18).
Museum of Archaeology. From
Tombs and Towns of Amcient
Egypt.
Museums Building. Rotunda ex-
hibit, "The Coal Flora of Michi-
gan." Exhibition halls, "Human
Development."
Law Library. Legal cartoons
(basement, July 24-August 18).
Michigan Historical Collections.
160 Rackham Building. "Tourists
in Michigan--Yesterday and To-
day."
Museum of Art. Oriental ceram-
ics (June 26-August 15). Modern
graphic art. (July 2-August 15).
Clements Library. Michigan rar-
ities. (August 1-18).
Events Today
Last performance of "The Great
Adventure" by Arnold Bennett,
presented by the Department of
Speech at Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre, 8 p.m. Tickets available at
the Mendelssohn box office, open
from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Coming Events
Naval Research Reserve: Meet-
ing Monday, August 14, 7:30 p.m.
at the Observatory.
Graduate Outing Club: Meet
Sunday, Northwest entrance Rack-
ham at 10 a.m. or 2 p.m. Swim-
xn~ng: ,nc1 -ov ;7 oat ring Gaits:~

Mgr, Stengal
NEW YORK-(P)-For the first
time in his major league career,
Joe DiMaggio has been benched.
The famed slugger of the New
York Yankees sat out last night's
game while Cliff Mapse took his
place in center field against the
Philadelphia Athletics.
"JOE IS DEAD TIRED," Man-
ager Casey Stengel said. "I in-
structed him to come to the park
late and not take either fielding or
batting practices I hate to do this
but this is the right time to do it."
The manager made the move
without consulting the star player.
" don't know how long I'll
keep him out," Casey went on.
"Perhaps a week. I'll put him in
sooner if he comes to me and
asks back in the lineup, however.
I just want to be sure he gets
enough of a layoff to be fresh for
the rest of the schedule."
DiMaggio was reticent, as usual,
to discuss himself and his troubles.
"I'm tired," he admitted in a
disgusted tone. "I've got my share
of aches and pains. I know some
people are saying that I'm about
through Well, they said that in
'46, but I wasn't."
DiMag is suffering from what
his co-star, Tommy Henrich, de-
scribes as a "fractured batting av-
erage." The Clipper had gotten
only four hits in) 38 times at bat
over the nine games previous to
last night, six of which the Yan-
kees lost. He didn't drive in a run
over that span.
The 35-year-old star was in uni-
form and available for pinch hit-
ting purposes if needed.
Bromwich Wins
In Davis Cup Play
RYE, N.Y.-(P)-Veteran John
Bromwich of Australia trounced
Torsten Johansson of Sweden, 6-2,
6-3, 6-0, to give his team an even
break in the first day's play of the
Davis Cup interzone finals after
Lennart Bergelin had upset Frank
Sedgman, the Australian chan-
pion, 2-6, 6-2, 7-5, 1-6, .6-3.
- Let's Eat
FISH &
CCHIPS
Tonight!
Golden Brown
French Fried Shrimp
Complete Fountain Service
LIBERTY
9i~hand Chip
301 E. Liberty

I

'I

i

ART-CINEMA LEAGUE
and
The American Society of Public Administration
present
Henry Fonda and Dana Andrews
in
a study of mob psycholog
Fridy 'nd Satu&rday, August I Vand 12
7:30 ad 9:30 P.M.,
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
AClance Sale Wed.-Sat., 1-6 P.M., Union

ELI Suu /Mflh

I

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
- BUSINESS ' t
SERVICES
BABY PARAKEETS and Canaries. New
and used bird cages. Reasonable
prices. 562 S. Seventh, Ph. 5330. )2B
WASHING-Finish work and ironing
also. Rough dry and wet washing.
Free pick up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020.
)1B
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist, at
308 S. State. Legal, Masters, Doctors
dissertations, etc. Call 2-2615 or
2-9848. )13
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Company,
215 E. Liberty. )4

TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING TO BOISE, IDAHO on Aug. 19
or 20. Desire companion to share ex-
pense and driving. Call 2-7981 after
6 P.M. ) 11T
DRIVER WANTED to drive car of sum-
mer school faculty member to Los
Angeles. Phone 3-1008. )12T
WANTED=Ride to Boston around Aug.
19. Ph. after six, 2-9776. )10T
LOST & FOUND
LOST.-8 tieeks tipocf- Yr>std
WHY? cause I f*orot-to pay fh my:
subscription to the. Sai -

I -.4-- 1

0 tuatO+
("1" HELP University Summer Session
WANTED Choir,Henry Veld, Conductor, will
be heard in its annual concert at
4:15 Sunday afternoon, August 13,
YOUNG MEN-20-30 yrs., wishing to in Hill Auditorium. It will be as-
improve their spare time at good pay, sisted by a string quartet consist-
learning heating business. Excellent
preparation for meeting people and ing of Alfred Boyington and James
gaining experience. Here is an oppor- V
tunity to make money whie waiting Vadersall, violinists, Emile Sim-
for fall term to begin or a permanent onel, violist, and George Webber,
connection if you so desire. App in cellist. The choir will sing compo-
person. Holland Furnace Co., 311 S. els.Th hi il igcmo
Ashley. )5H sitions by Heinrich Schutz, Bach,
WANTED TO BUY Murray, Nikolski, Glinka, DeLa-
marter, Scandello, Barber and
HOUSE FOR MEDICAL FRATERNITY- Jenkins. The general public will be
Full1 year occuacy. Preferab~ly near

I

{ TODAY!
See It Day and Date With
It's Broadway Opening!

r

.7Xi'7

- a ls
PLUTO
in WALT DISNEY'S
"Food for Feudin"

.-

1 1011

FOR SALE

p

in

I

._._. ____ __ ,.. , r

COOL!1

CONTINUOUS
FROM 1 P.M.

Last
Times
Todayl

. .T-E.

TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales & Service
MORRILLS-314 S. State St._)4B
0 PERSONAL

s
a

STARTS SUNDAY

ATTENTION AUGUST GRADS: Last
chance to take advantage of student
rates before you hit the cold, cruel
world !
ATTENTION VISITING TEACHERS:
Last chance to place your magazine
ordershat our special rates. Just
phone your order.
ATTENTION PALL STUDENTS: Or-
ders placed now will begin at regis-
tration time. Start the school year
right. Student#.Periodical Agency. 705
1st Nat'l Bank Bldg. Ph. 2-8242. )2
HEY FOLKS-What am I going to do
now? Better send me some money
so that I can pay for my subscription
to the Daily. If you don't I'll be a
Freshman again._Pete.
KIDDIE KARE-Reliable baby sitters.
Ph. 3-1121. )10B
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161 )1P
WANTED TO RENT
PROFESSOR WANTS HOUSE-2 bed-
room, for one week or 10.days, be-
ginning Aug. 20. Ph. 2-6109. )5N

'38 FORD CONVERTIBLE-Radio, heat-
er, fog lights. $165. Phone 2-0995. )47
SINGLE BED complete with box springs
and innerspring mattress. 312 N.
Thayer. )46
MOTORCYCLE-Indian Chief, 1946, 74,
Excellent condition. Seen any time
at 1617_Washtenaw. )43
GOLF CLUBS--Matched set, 4 irons, 2
woods. Never used. $26.45. Also wom-
an's set. Same size, same price. Ph.
2-8692. )23
BEAT THE RISING COSTS! Navy "T"
shirts--45c; white Navy Broadcloth
Shirts--49c; Biiefs-39c; Undershirts
-39c: All Wool Athletic Hose-49c.
Open 'til 6 P.M. Sam's Store, 122 E.
Washington St. )
1949 CUSHMAN Motor Scooter. Call
3-4986, leave name, ph. number._ )42
2-WHEEL TRAILERS-Will BUY or sell.
Antique chest. Twin-beds and chests.
716 S. Forest. Ph. 2-2800. )40
FOR RENT
MEN'S SINGLE ROOM - Reasonable.
822 Brookwood. Ph. 3-4816. )9R
FRATERNITY
o JEWELRY V
SOUVENIRS - GIFTS
TRADITIONAL MUGS
c DIAMONDS - WATCHES c
CUPS --TROPHIES
SL. G. BALFOUR CO. V
1319 S. University
'"Home of the
Official Michigan Ring"
Summer Hours, ten till five;
o closed Saturdays.
o<""""t<"""">0""">o"''">o<""""o '

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