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August 10, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-08-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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- A JUL JLJ Ivit A T-A-

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... ... . - ............. .- - - -- - . -. . - - --" ..- - - ...~ -.. .

P hils Stretch Lead; Tigers 3Up After Nippii

ig Chisox

;"--

*

*

*

*

*

*

Dodgers Lose in Eighth;
Braves Stop Giants, 3-2
BROOKLYN - (P) - J i m flied to Gene Hermanski, driving
KonstantS made his 50th relief home Jones.
appearance of the year today as *
the onrushing Phillies swept the BRAVES 3, GIANTS 2
two-game series from Brooklyn, BOSTON-(P)--T w o booming
-g doubles by Bob Elliott brought an
end to the New York Giants'
The victory, their 14th in the stririg of eight straight victories,
last 18, preserved the Phils five- giving victory to the Boston Braves
game lead. 3 to 2.
Konstanty-. took over in the Elliott's two bagger in the
eighth after Mike Goliat's fly ball fourth, with two out, was follow-
with the bases loaded scored Wil- ed by Sid Gordon's double to score
lie Jones from third with the the first Braves run. In the sixth
Phils tie-breaking run. with the Giants leading, 2-1, El-
A walk to Jones, Granny Ham- liott's second double scored Earl
ner's double and an intentional Torgeson who had walked. Elliott
pass to Andy Seminick ' by Erv advanced to third on a fly and
Palica loaded them up with one scored the winning run on Tommy
out in the. eighth. Then Goliat Holmes' high pop to Bobby Thom-
1 pson.
THANKS FOR YOUR Bob Chipman went all the way
for the Braves to make his sea-
PATRONAGE son's record six victories and six
We feel pleased to have losses. Chipman didn't allow a
served you again. New York hit until the sixth.
The DASCOLA BARBERS Two National League games were
- iberty near State postponed.
lc =oco;;(c ;;;;>04 o0-c:: o<;;;;oc:::oc >so > oco;
r At WESLEYAN GUILD
8 PM. FRIDAY NIGHT 8 P.M...
(Parking lot of First Methodist Church)
WAYNE KUHNS, Caller
Swing your Ice Cream Lots of Fun
oPartner * and *for
j Two by Two Cold Drinks Old & Young
ADMISSION 30c D.P. FUND BENEFIT ^
HENRY H.
STEVENS, Inc.
LONG
D STANCE
MOVING
Fit, Michigan
Phone Flint
Collect 4-1686
For Lower Interstate Rates. We own, operate and schedule
our own fleet of vans for direct service without transfer.

Oosterbaan

Calls for Gridders
League Standngs PcInvites 73 to
Leage Sandigs Fall Practice

Yanks Still Hot on Trail
Of Bengals ith 2-1 in

Locke Beats
Man grum for
Tam Jackpot
CHICAGO-(P)-Bobby Locke
defeated Lloyd Mangrum by four
strokes, 69-73, in a playoff yes-
terday to win $2,500 and the Tam
O'Shanter All-American golf ti-
tle.
The triumph marked his first
return to U. S. fairways in more
than a year.
"I just can't say how nice it is
to be back in the United States
again," said the Johannesburg,
South Africa, putting wizard as
he tucked promoter George S.
May's check in his pocket.
Mangrum, who won $20,000 and
everything but the door knobs at
Tam in 1948 when Locke was run-
ner-up, accepted second money of
$1,750.
"It is certainly a pleasure to
be doing business with an old es-
tablished firm," cracked Mangrum.
"That's a good hunk of cash for
the kind of golf I played today."
After the first four holes, Locke
had scooted ahead by two strokes.
Mangrum never came close to clos-
ing the gap as they toiled over the
par 36-36 - 72, layout under a
broiling sun.
And in the unwieldy throng -
which made the affair look like
Custer's last stand - were several
new fathers hauling their off-
springs around in baby carriages.
It was a poor man's show, and
quite a picnic.

Major

AMERICA

N

W
Detroit 65
New York 63
Cleveland 63
Boston 60
Washington 45
Cheago 42
St. Louis 36
Phtladjelphia 38
**
TODAY'S

LEAGUE
L Pct.
36 .644
40 .612
41 .606
45 .571
55 .450
65 .393
65 .356
66 .364
GAMES

k

GB
3
31f
7
19 'A
26
29
28 /-

W
Philadelphia 65
Boston 58
St. Louis 57
Brooklyn 54
New York 53
Chicago 43
Cincinnati 43
Pittsburgh 34

L
42
45
46
44
48
57
58
67

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Pet.
.607
.563
.553
.551
.525
.430
.426
.357

GB
5
6
61/
9
18 /A
19
28

'Septemberd
By MARV EPSTEIN
(Daily Sports Editor)

Philadelphia at New York -
Hooper (10-7) or Kellner (6-13)
vs. Lopat (13-6).
Detroit at Chicago (2)-New-
houser (10-6) and Houtteman
(13-9) or Stuart (1-0) vs. Hol-
combe (2-7) and Gumpert (5-5).
Cleveland at Washington (2)
(twi-night) --Nixon (3-1) and
Masterson (4-4) vs. Kuzava (6-
7) and Consuegra (4-3).

TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Boston (night) -
Roe (14-7) vs. Sain (16-7).
New York at Philadelphia
(night) - Jansen (13-7) vs.
Church (5-2).
Chicago at'Pittsburgh (night)
-Rush (9-14) or Schmitz (9-10)
vs. Werle (6-9).
(Only games scheduled.)

Sugar Ray Hangs On To Title
In Clean Decision over Fusari

JERSEY CITY, N. J.--(1P)-Su-
gar Ray Robinson retained his
world welterweight championship
last night with a clean-cut 15-
round decision over Charley Fu-
sari before a capacity crowd of
more than 30,000 in Roosevelt
Stadium.
Robinson weighed 147 pounds,
the exact limit for his class,uand
Fusari came in at 145%/. The
champion gave all of his purse

except for one dollar to the Da-
mon Runyon Fund.
Robinson drew blood freely from
Fusari's head in the opening
rounds but the challenger came
back strongly.
Referee Paul Cavalier carded 14
rounds for Robinson and one for
Fusari, the fourth.
Summer locker refund must
be picked up by 5:30 p.m. to-
morrow in the Sports Building.

''Every game is our toughest
game and our policy will be the
same as always. We concentrate
on one at a time."
In these days of more ominous
greetings, Coach Bennie Ooster-
bann's salutation to 73 football
candidates came as a welcome
reminder yesterday that, the world
situation notwithstanding, Michi-
gan will embark on another great
football season with the opening
of fall practice on September 6.
* *I *
MOST OF the 1950 hopefuls
got their invites yesterday; the
rest will receive the notices to
report back today. On the mailing
list were 22 veteran lettermen.
A new Western Conference
ruling will bring the mob to Ann
Arbor a day before practice is
officially scheduled to begin.
September 5 will be devoted to
placating the press and the pho-
tographic corps. Uniforms will
be issued that afternoon, so that
workouts can begin in earnest
on the following day.
Looking over the invitation list,
Oosterbaan observed, "We no long-
er have the backlog of experienc-
ed players built up during the
post-war y e a r s.uConsequently
we've spent more time surveying
the entire group. That meant
more scrimmage in spring prac-
tice with a higher number of mi-
nor injuries.
"THAT ALSO MEANT less time
for individual instruction and po-
lishing. We do have a number of
boys with good potentialities, but
most of them need a full year of
seasoning."
The post-war backlog that the
Michigan mentor was referring
to included Dick Kempthorn,
one of the greatest linebackers
in Wolverine history; all-around
back and punter Wally Teninga;
the quarterback duo of John
Ghindia and Bill Bartlett; full-
back Tom Peterson; right half
Bob Van Sunmern, and left
half Chuck Lentz, whose seven.
interceptions last year set a
Conference record.
Gone from the backlog of great
material Oosterbaan is used tc
having at his disposal are All-
American Al Wistert, and linemar
Jim Atchison, Lloyd Heneveld,
Don McClelland, Bob Erban, Irv
Wisniewski and Bob Holloway.
Oosterbaan and company will
have three major problems to
solve; the quarterback slot, the
entire forward wall, and lack
of experienced reserve strength.
Meanwhile Oosterbaan w i 1'
spend between now and the fifti
of September finding new spots or
his head for additional grey hairs

CHICAGO - (P) - The Detroit
Tigers retained their three-game
edge on the American League field
by. defeating the Chicago White
Sox 5-3 yesterday.
Vic Wertz, the second batter ever
to drive a baseball into the center
field bullpen in Comiskey Park,
helped the first-placers to victory
on his homer, his 24th It follow-
ed an eighth-inning double by
George Kell to supply Detroit's
winning margin.
Freddie Hutchinson scattered
nine Chicago hits to gain his 13th
victory.
Ray Scarborough was the victim,
suffering his fourteenth loss. De-
troit tagged the veteran right
hander and Billy Pierce, who
pitched the ninth, for 10 hits-five
for extra bases.
YANKEES 2, RED SOX 1
NEW YORK-(P)-Vic Raschi
pitched the New York Yankees to
a 2 to 1 victory over the Boston
Red Sox yesterday, and for six
and two-thirds breathless innings
it looked as if he might achieve
the first perfect game in the ma-
jor leagues since 1922.
Billy Goodman's infield single
finally broke the magic of the
big Yankee's strong right arm.
Then in the eighth Al Zarilla hit
a homer to end any argument
over the close decision on Good-
man at first base.
As it was, Raschi retired 32 cpn-
secutive batters in his last two
pitching performances, both su-
perb ones. He set down the last
12 Cleveland Indians to face him
Aug. 4 when he won 1-0, and the
first 20 Red Sox today. In both

these games he allowed only three
hits.
INDIANS 4-8, BROWNS 3-10
St. Louis-(IP)-Ken Wood slam-
med a two-run homer in the eighth
to break an 8-8 tie and give the
St. Louis Browns a 10 to 8 deci-
sion over the Cleveland Indians
in the finale of a twi-night twin-
bill last night after Larry Doby
led the Indians to a 4-3 triumph
in the opener with a pair of two-
run circuit blows.
ATHLETICS 7, SENATORS 6
PHILADELPHIA -(AP)- Catcher
Joe Tipton's only hit of the game,
a single with two out, scored Sam
Chapman with the winning run
last night as the Philadelphia Ath-
letics defeated Washington 7-6 in
eleven innings before a sparse
turnout of 1,055.
Chapman had tripled with one
out. Mickey Harris, fourth Wash-
ington pitcher to see action, then
walked Ferris Fain and handed
an intentional pass to Billy Hitch-
cock to fill the bases.
37.50
SUMMER SUITS
Now 27.75

ELRUhFIEfl

COOL!

Continuous from 1 P.M.
Weekdays 44c to 5 P.M.

-.-&.. Li.. A .A A - aa-A A--LA%&

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
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Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
N BUSINESS
SERVICES
THE STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
is authorized to offer special rates to
students and educators. Ph. 2-8242.
BABY PARAKEETS and Canaries. New
and used bird cages. Reasonable
prices. 562 S. Seventh, Ph. 5330. )2B
WASHING-Finish work and ironing
also. Rough dry and wet washing.
Free pick up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020.
lIB
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist, at
308 S. State. Legal, Masters, Doctors
dissertations, etc. Call 2-2615 or
2-9848. )13
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Company,
215 E. Liberty..'...).,
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS'
Sales & Service
MORRILLS-314 S. State St. )4B
q00>0 =>G 0 o0 =>4=>04
FRATERNITY
-o JEWELRYO
SOUVENIRS - GIFTS
TRADITIONAL MUGS
DIAMONDS - WATCHES
CUPS - TROPHIES
o L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. Universityv
.. "Home of theU
Official Michigan Ring" C
Summer Hours, ten till five;
o closed Saturdays.
90<"""">0<""'">0<"""0<""""0<""""0< ,

FOR RENT
SUBLET for Fall term only-4 room
furnished apatrment, $80 ma. Con-
venient location. Call evenings 3-4402.
) 8R
e PERSONAL
THIS IS TO ANNOUNCE to all my
friends that I'm leaving here in Aug-
ust, dragging my degree, and my sub-
scriptions to Time and Life with me.
Why don't you gruys break down and
subscribe at the special school year
rate of $3? Orders take 6-8 weeks to
start, so ph. 2-8242 now to get your
copies in September. Act now; be
billed later. Pablo. )2
HEY FOLKS-What am I g ing to do
now? Btter sendme some money
so that I can pay for my subscription
to the Daily. If you don't I'll be a
Freshman again. Pete.
KIDDIE KARE-Reliable baby sitters.
Ph. 3-1121. )10B
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161 )1P
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Ride to Boston around Aug.
19. Ph. after six, 2-9776. )10T
DOCTOR DRIVING TO CALIF-Leave
Aug. 18 or 19. Want riders. Share costs
,andl drlving. Ph 3=-$214 aften 6 O n.
--.LLOST & FOUND
LOST-- weeks of good, hard, study.
WHY? cause I forgot to pay for my
subscription to the Daily,
LOST-Black zipper notebook, name F.
Faulkner on cover. Phone University
extension 2588. Reward. )21L
LOST-Mon. 7 Aug. K&E slide rule, be-
tween Arb entrance on Geddes & E.
Eng. Finder please call W. Conrad,
2-6674. )22L
WANTED TO RENT
GRADS WANT TRIPLE SUITE with pri-
vate bath for fall. Near campus. Call
2-1465 after 7. )3N
STUDENT-Experienced house painter.
Wants room and work near campus.
Bob Shore, 2-0113. )4N

MOTORCYCLE-'38 Indian Chief, A-1
shape. Bargain. 2-7601 or 1617 Wash-
tenaw. You should see this. )44
MOTORCYCLE-Indian Chief, 1946, 74.
Excellent condition. Seen any time
at 1617 Washtenaw. )43
GOLF CLUBS-Matched set, 4 irons, 2
woods. Never used. $26.45. Also wom-
an's set. Same size, same price. Ph.
_2-8692. ___________)23
BEAT THE RISING COSTS! Navy "T"
shirts--45c; white Navy Broadcloth
Shirts-49c; Briefs-39c; Undershirts
-39c: All Wool Athletic Hose-49c.
Open 'til 6 P.M. Sam's Store, 122 E.
Washington St. )5_ ______
ROYAL PORTABLE-Recently overhaul-
ed,.excellent condition. $40. Call
7009. ) 41
1949 CUSHMAN Motor Scooter. Call
3-4986. leave name, ph. number. )42
2-WHEEL TRAILERS-Will BUY or sell.
Antique chest. Twin-beds and chests.
716 S. Forest. Ph. 2-2800. )40
1930 CHEVROLET COUPE-Goodcondi-
tion, radio and heater. Call Don Edge
9400 after 5. )39
HELP WANTED
MAN WANTED-Full or part time. Car
necessary. No canvassing. Arrange
own hours for good, assurred income.
Call 3-1168,_evenings. )6H
YOUNG MEN-20-30 yrs., wishing to
improve their spare time at good pay,
learning heatingrbusiness. Excellent
preparation for meeting people and
gaining experience. Here is an oppor-
tunity to make money while waiting
for fall term to begin or a permanent
connection If -yvbu so desire. Apply in
person_ Holland Furace.Co,, )1 S.
Ashley. . .-' .)5H

TO H

FOR SALE

Lusty Song Wins
In Hambletonian
GOSHEN, N. Y.-(AP)-L u s t y
Song, the two-year-old trotting
champion a year ago, won the sil-
v e r anniversary Iambletonian
stakes in straight heats yester-
day.
The strapping brown, . son of
Volomite-Scotch Song, took on a
dozen of the nation's best three-
year-old trotters in this richest of
all Hambletonians and blazed
home to grab the winner's share
of $40,537. The time far both heats
was 2:02 flat.

"The Great Adventure"

A
Y
.ia,..

I.

a comedy by ARNOLD BENNETT
Tickets: $1.20-- 90c - 60c (tax incl.);
8 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

.i.
"

STRAW HATS
1/3 Off
TOPCOATS
20% tOff
Year Round Suits
37504975
Values to 65.00
KuOHN'S
217 East Liberty

F.

I

4'
fa

JACKIE ROBINSON'
"The Pride of Brooklyn" as HIMSELF in
"THE
M E ROINSI.I.I....
MIOR STRY"
with MINOR WATSON- RUBY DEE
as "Branch Rickey" of "Anna Lucasta" Fame
RICHARD LANE as"Clay Hopper" of the
yMontreal Royals"
>, and Billy Wayne as "Clyde Sukeforth"

The American Society of Public Administration

I

I I

I U WI AWJ'IN5 'IAYJ I

Ii

118,

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