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July 14, 1949 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-14

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JULY~ 14, 1949--

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The
MORNING REPORT
by MERLE LEVIN, SPORTS EDITOR

Big

Ten

Dros

Lightweight

Football

('.

S

IT'S GOOD TO SEE that tough-luck Gene Derricotte
to the Collegiate All-Star team that will square
Philadelphia Eagles come August 12 in Chicago.

has been named
off against the

Gene was a very good halfback in his four years at Michigan,
good enough at 17 to be a first-stringer on the 1944 team, that
lost the Western Conference championship in the final game of
the season, good enough to be called "the finest safety man I
have ever coached" by Fritz Crisler, good enough to be rated as
the leading All-American candidate on a team thatw as destined
to win the National Championship last year.
He had ever asset necessary for an All-American rating. Tremen-
dous speed, an amazing change of pace, kicking ability, passing ability,
Gene had them all. He seldom missed on pass defense and he was one
of the surest tacklers in the business. They never got by Derricotte.
But Fate just couldn't see Gene achieving the honor he 'de-
served. An ankle injury cut down his effectiveness in the final
games of the 1944 season to almost nothing. He didn't last out
the first half of that final, and as usual "crucial" tilt with Ohio
State.
After a hitch in the Army he returned to Michigan in 1946
only to run into a broken nose and a dimpled ex-flier from his home
state of Ohio named Bob Chappuis who had designs on Gene's
old halfback post. Derricotte started as many games as Chappuis
did that year, but Chappuis was busy running up a new Conference
ground-gaining record and garnering most of the headline space
in the doing.
1947 saw Gene installed as defensive quarterback in Fritz
Crisler's two-platoon system which was to revolutionize football.
Crisler will quickly testify to the quality of the quiet Negro's
work, but they don't give headlines to a defensive back. There
wasn't much room anyhow after the exploits of Chappuis, Elliott
and company had been divulged to the reading public.
The door to fame slammed right in Gene's face last season.
Almost a lead pipe cinch for All-American honors according to pre-
season dopesters, Gene was carried off thef ield with a wrenched
and twisted knee in the season opener at Michigan State. His replace-
ment was Charley Ortmann, a blond sophomore who was, being
compared to the immortal Tom Harmon by the time he had com-
pleted two games of actual competition.
DERRICOTTE SOON HOBBLED DOWN to practice but he wasn't
ready to go again until the Minnesota game mid-way through the
season. Returning to action at Minneapolis, his knee tightly bandaged,
Gene went down for a punt in the first quarter. He bent, but his
knee wouldn't. He kicked the ball with his stiff leg and it: rolled
over the goal line where Minnesota's massive Leo Nomellini fell on
it for a touchdown that gave the Gophers a 7-0 lead.
Gene's teammates were incensed, not at Gene but at the
break that had cast him in the role of "goat." Back in.the huddle
they slapped him on the back and told him to forget it. They
took up the battle cry "let's get one for Gene" and they made it
plus three more for good measure. Bennie Oosterbaan insists
that it was the break that turned the tide and won theg ame.
It takes a mighty popular boy to stir up his teammates in that
fashion after booting one that could have mneant the Big Nine title
and an end of a long winning streak.
So when Gene gets his chance before the 100,000 plus fans
who jam Soldier's Field for the yearly All Star classic I think I'll
be rooting just a little harder than usual for one of those patented
hip-weaving, pace-changing broken field runs that Gene was
famous for while laboring under the shadows of Chappuis and
the injury jinx. I'd like to hear 100,000 people cheering him on.
I think the guy deserves it.

D)UGIN:
Bums Meet
Cards for
Big Series
Brooklyn has its chance to
lengthen its National League lead
which now measures only a half
game on St. Louis. The Dodgers
dig in at Ebbets Field for 13
games, winding up with a big four-
game set with the Cardinals. Those
four games and three more the
next week in St. Louis loom as the
most important dates on the
schedule so far this summer.
Cincinnati leads the western
delegates into Ebbets Field where
the Reds haven't won a game this
year in six starts. After that it's
Chicago, Pittsburgh and St. Louis
in order.
THE CARDS open against the
Phillies who hold a 7-5 edge over
them for the 'season. After Phila-
delphia, St. Louis hits New York
and Boston, each for three games,
before the big four in Brooklyn.
St. Louis has won 35 of its last 50
games

HOT TIP:
Cleveland
Big Threat
To Yankees
NEW YORK - (P) -Watch out
for Cleveland was the tip passed
around press headquarters by the
baseball writers covering the All-
Star game and major league meet-
ings.
The world champion Indians,
making their move from way back
like stymie used to do, have been
passing teams for a month. Now
they're second, 5% games back of
New York.
NOBODY UNDERRATES the
Yankees, who have been out front
since opening day. With Joe Di-
Maggio playing every day, they
definitely are the team to beat.
The Boston Red Sox also draw
strong support for their current
seven-game win streak after
breaking an eight-game losing
slump. Joe McCarthy's Sox are
still fourth, 812 games off the
pace but now only a game and
a half behind the faltering Phil-
adelphia A's;
Events Today
Stage Play presented by the
Department of Speech: "The
Glass Menagerie," fragile, poig-
nant drama by Tennessee Wil-
liams, voted the best Broadway
play of the 1944-45 season. Per
formance begins at 8 p.m. at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater. Tick-
ets are on sale now at the Theater
box office in the Michigan League
Bldg.
University Community Center,
1045 Midway Place, Willow Run
Village, Mich.:
Thurs., July 14, 8 p.m., Ceramics
group meeting.
(Continued on Page 4)

ac o terest Stop>s
Banii im iidiron Sport
By MERLE LEVIN
(aily Sports Editor)
Lightweight football has been discontinued as a Western Con-
ference athletic activity.
The 150-pound variety of gridiron activity, sponsored by four
Western Conference schools: Illinois, Ohio State, Wisconsin and
Michigan has been dropped because of lack of interest at other Big
Ten schools and heavy travel costs.
4' * * *
ONLY MICHIGAN AND WISCONSIN whose athletic directors,
Fritz Crisler and Harry Stuhldreher, were instrumental in introducing

HEROES IN DEFEAT-Andy Pafko (center) Stan Musial, and
Ralph Kiner (right) National League stars shown in dressing
room after the American League won the All Star game, 11-7
at Ebbets Field, Brooklyn (July 12). Andy Pafko of the Chicago
Cubs shows home run hitters Stan Musial of St. Louis and Ralph
Kiner, of Pittsburgh, how he took a hit away from Vic Wertz

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)

Hall, in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the degree of
Master of Music. His program will
include compositions by Mozart,
Bach, Alban Berg, and Schumann.
This recital is open to the public
The University Musical Society
announces two major concert se-
ries for next season, as follows:
Choral Union Series (10 con-
certs) : Artur Rubinstein, pianist,
Tues., Oct. 4; Vienna Choir Boys,
Sat., Oct. 15; Boston Symphony,
Charles Munch, conductor, Sun.,
Oct. 23; Cleveland Orch. George
Szell, conductor, Sun., Nov. 6; Italo
Tajo, bass,nWed., Nov. 16; Rise
Stevens, mezzo - saprano, Mon.,
Dec. 5; Cincinnati Orch., Thor
Johnson, conductor, Tues., Jan. 17;
Myra Hess, pianist, Fri., Feb. 17;
Pittsburgh Orch., Paul Paray,
guest conductor, Thurs., Feb. 23;
Zino Francescatti, violinist, Mon.,
Mar. 20.
Extra. Concert Series (5 con-
certs):' Nelson Eddy, baritone,
Sun., Oct. 9; Boston Symphony
Orch., Charles Munch, conductor,
Tues., Oct. 25; Tossy Spivakovsky,
violinist, Tues., Nov. 22; Carroll
Glenn, violinist and Eugene List,
pianist, Fri., Jan. 6; Chicago Sym-
phony Orch., Fritz Reiner, guest
conductor, Sun., Mar. 12.
Orders for season tickets now
being accepted and filed in se-
quence Orders will be filled in the
same order and mailed Sept. 20.
" S . S O
\\
"A STAR IS BOR N"

Address: Charles A. Sink, Pres-
ident, University Musical Society,
Burton Memorial Tower.
Carillon Recital: Percival Price,
University Carillonneur, will pre-
sent a program on Thursday, July
14, at 7:15 p.m. His compositions
will include selections by Couperin:
Andante cantabile for carillon by
De Groot; a group of Schubert
songs; a group of Czech songs and
the Polk from Schwanda by Wein-
berger.

Exhibitions
Rackham Galleries: Paintings
by Willard MacGregor, Visiting
Professor of Piano, School of Mu-
sic (July 8-August 5), East Gal-
lery.
Education Conference Textbook
Exhibit: Corridors of University
High School and University Ele-
mentary School buildings.
Museum of Art: Drawings by
Isamu Noguchi, through July 31;
Arabic and Persian Miniatures,
through Aug. 3. Alumni Memorial
Hall. Weekdays, 9-5, Sundays, 2-5.
The public is invited.

Parker Moves
To Clay Court
Quarter-Finals
CHICAGO--O('-Veteran Frank
Parker, gunning for his sixth title,
advanced to the quarter - final
round of the National Clay Courts
Tennis Championship tourney to-
day and Pancho Gonzales, a fel-
low Californian, moved ahead w ith
him.
Parker, the steady ma of 20-
years of tournament tnii =., blast-
ed Clarke Taylor, Chapel Bill, N.
C., 6-1, 6-3, 6-1, in a third round
match at River Forest Tennis Club.
The Los Angeles ace, who won the
Spring Lake N.J. Invitational sin-
gles title on Monday for the 10th
time, played under wraps today
and let Taylor make the errors.
* *.*
GONZALES, THE defending
champion, also from Los Angeles,
eliminated Keston Deimling Jr.,
of the host club, 6-1, 6-0, 6-2.
Gonzales, seeded No. 1, had too
much speed for his less experienc-
ed foe and forced him into many
errors.
Parker is seeded No. 2. He
was absent a year ago when
Gonzales won the title.
OTHER THIRD round winners
in the men's singles included Vic
Seixas, Philadelphia, who defeat-
ed Jack Sunderland, Indianapolis,
6-3, 6-2, 6-1; Herbert Flam, Bev-
erly Hills, Calif., who downed Dix-
on Osburn, Dallac, Tex., 6-1, 6-2,
6-3, and Hugh Stewart, Pasadena,
Calif., who eliminated Herb Beh-
rens, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., 6-3,
6-2, 8-6.

and promoting the sport were will-
ing to continue next season.
In announcing the discon-
tinuing of the 150-pound game
Stuhldreher stated, "Wisconsin
regrets very much that it must
discontinue 150 pound varsity
football which has been so suc-
cessful here.
"When the four schools began
150 pound football in 1947, it was
hoped that the other schools would
soon join in to make more com-
patible schedules, but, after two
years of sponsorship, the fact that
no other institution responded, it
was agreed among the four of us
th1 ati it was not feasible to con-
tinue on with the sport."
* *' *
CLIFF KEEN, who coached the
Michigan 150-pounders to two co-
championships with Wisconsin, ex-
pressed strong regrets at hte dis-
continuation of the lightweight
game. Stating that plans for a
game with powerful Navy had
been dropped, he announced that
there would be no team formed for
the fall season.
"I've written all the boys (the
Wolverine team was returning
practically intact) and I'm sure
that they will be bitterly disap-
pointed," Keen said. "I've never
coached a team in my 24 years at
Michigan that had so much spirit
and which so completely exempli-
fied the spirit of Michigan as
those boys did."
Of the Western Conference
schools not represented in the
league, only Indiana and Purdue
had evidenced interest in the
sport HoweverdMichigan State was
making plans to field a team, per-
haps as soon as next season.
Those plans will probably be
dropped.

CIRIEIIEDSI

Am
;*-If

FOR SALE

4

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SALE

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Forget the Heat - Relax with
RMCA VICTOR
RECORDS
44
DANCES NOT FOR DANCING.......... 4.7;
First Piano Quartet MO 131(

1943 INDIAN MOTORCYCLE-Excellent
economy,.top condition, many extras.
cheap. N. Manfredi, 1715 Darby, Wil-
low Run Village. )67
TWO CANVAS COTS, army style, like
new, $3 ea. 1356 Geddes, 2nd Fl., after
3 p.m. )83
1949 INDIAN Motorcycle. Scout-twin.
1400 miles. Must sell. Phone 9267 be-
tween 11:00 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. or
5:30 p.m. and 1:00 a.m. )78
BOBBY JONES registered woods and
irons. Complete set-slightly used.
Can be seen at Van Boven Shoe
Store from 9-5:30. )70
MEN'S English type Bicycle. Gear shift
and basket. Edward Eriksen, 1319
Cambridge. )71
1937 STUDEBAKER, Four-Door Sedan.
Engine recently overhauled. Good
tires. Clean upholstery. New heater.
426 Eberwhite, Phone 2-8335. )72
GIRL'S Schwinn balloon tire bicycle.
Good condition. Reasonably priced.
Call 9276 after 5 p.m., ask for Betty.
)73
INDIAN Motorcycle, 1943, 30.50, like
new, $350. O. E. Moore, 428Hamilton
Pl., Tel. 2-4538, after 6:00 p.m. )77
1937 DODGE, radio, heater. Clean. Good
transportation. Best offer-2-7401. )75

DODGE, 1928 with radio. In good con-
dition. Call or seee after 6:00 p.m.
Torn Rich, Phone 2-7715, 1105 S.
Church St. )80
1931 MODEL A Ford. New tires. Excel-
lent motor. 1366 Ervin Ct., Willow
Village, after 5:00 p.m. )74
Good transportation. Best offerET
FORD-1937 2-door $175.00 or any rea-
sonable offer. 1589 Springfield, Willow
Village. Ph. Ypsi 4276R13. )59
SUMMER SEPECIALS. Army type foot,
lockers, $10.99 (all taxes included).
U.S. Navy T-Shirts, $.49. Suntan
pants, $2.99. Sleeping Bags, $2.95 up.
Short-sleeve Sport Shirts, $1.69. Open
'til 6:30. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington. )82
LOST
and
FOUND
LOST-Brown collapsible umbrella. On
campus. Call New Dorm (2-6581),
room 6569. )84
---

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

COOL

-- Starts Today -

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SERENADE No. 10, K.361 (Mozart),
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SYMPHONY No. 88 IN G (Haydn)'
NBC Symphony-Toscanini

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HELP WANTED
WILLOW RUN Cooperative Nursery in-
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Teacher's certificate, experience re-
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3574M11. )69
BUSINESS
SERVICES
TYPEWRITING SERVICE
Student reports, theses, dissertations.
Phone 6197. )28
WE BIND THESES, term papers and
dissertations in a variety of styles and
colors.
OLSEN'S BINDERY
325 E. Hoover Phone 2-7976 )1
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )2
BUS. AD AND ECON. STUDENTS. A
special student rate on FORTUNE
has been established for you-$7.50
yr. instead of $12.50-saves you $5.
To order, phone Student Periodical
Agency, 6007. )81
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