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June 22, 1949 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-06-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY 'EEA

[PERTS' ADVICE:
Safety Precautions Can
Prevent Polio Epideniies

Educators Still Fighting
For Academic Freedom

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Summer months are danger
months when infantile paralysis
lurks in every corner ready to
.break out in severe epidemics.
But epidemics can be prevented
or danger reduced if people heed
precautionary rules for themselves
Drama Class
For Teachers
Teachers and others not con-
centrating in speech will learn
how to produce shows from a new
course being offered this summer
by the speech department.
Teachers' Workshop in Drama-
tics has no prerequisites.
* * *
APPLICATIONS for the course,
which is limited to 30 students,
may be made to the speech de-
partment.
In order to give students ex-
perience in all phases of play
production, directors, designers,
costumers and stage techni-
cians, as well as the cast, will
be selected from members of
the class wherever possible.
The class will select a play and
then proceed to stage it at the
University High School auditor-
ium.
Jack Earl Bender, of the speech
department, who is in charge, of
the class, says that the equipment
available at the- high school will
give students an idea of what is
available in the average school.

and for children, according to the
National Foundation for Infantile
Paralysis.
THE RULES CAN be easily fol-
lowed and will not interrupt work
or play duirng the summer.
Crowds bring close contact, so
head for the wide-open spaces
as much as possible.
Playing or working too hard
and too long bring much-to-be-
avoided over-fatigue, which raises
susceptibility to all kinds of germs
and viruses.
NOBODY LIKES to swim in
polluted water though they do it
all the time, but for self-preserva-
tion, confine beach sports to the
bathtub when there is no other
water to be had.
Sudden chills are as bad as
overfatigue, and summer weath-
er is noted for its fickleness.
And, as in any country and any
climate, food tastes better when
not left to the ants and flies.
*- * *
EARLY diagnosis and prompt
treatment is the worst enemy of
any disease, and in the case of
polio such treatment often pre-
vents serious crippling.
Symptoms include headache,
nausea or upset stomach, stiff or
sore muscles and unexplained
fever.
In cases of excessive cost of
treatment, the local chapter of
the National Foundation will foot
the part of the bill that the pa-
tient or family cannot meet.

(Continued from Page 1)
~~ ~------ ----- - ~
Ober criticized hiring of Com-
munist teachers. "Most of the
damage from (Communist )
teachers is done outside the
classroom, made possible by the
influence gained in the class-
room-with prestige as a pro-
fessor," he said.
"The test of a professor's ac-
tions ought not to be whether he
can be actually proved guilty of a
crime. Reasonable grounds to
doubt his loyalty to our govern-
ment should disqualify him ."
4. HOWEVER., AT THE same
time, 20 top educators-including
Dr. Conant and Gen. Dwight Ei-
senhower, president of Columbia
University-issued a report which
said:
Members of the Communist
Party should, not be employed
as teachers.
The reason: A Communist
has no academic freedom any-
way; he surrendered intellec-
tual honesty when he joined the
party and now, sheep-like, does.
what it tells him.
But whether or not, Commun-
ists would teach, it was evident
that attempts to curb academic
freedom would bring strong pro-
test.
.* * *
DR. RUTHVEN refused to send
the Un-American Activities Com-
mittee a list of texts used here.
"It is not within the rights
of the Committee to ask for
such a list. It would not mean
anything anyway - we have
hundreds of texts and courses
and they are changing con-
stantly."
"In my private opinion, they

had better send for a University
Library Catalog-at their own ex-
pense."
* * *
CORNELL President Day warn-
ed that universities were in dan-
ger of "infiltration, not by those
attacking Communism, but by
those who, under the guise of at-
tacking Communism, attack some-
thing quite different: academic!
freedom."
Dr. George F. Zook, president
of the American Council onI
Education, told the Committee
that the survey raises "very
grave issues."
The House Committee decided
they didn't need the books after
five members of the nine man
committee told the Associated
Pressuthat they were not evenj
consulted about Chairman Wood's
request for book lists.
Prrof. Sellars
Co-edits Book
Prof. Roy W. Sellars, of the phi-
losophy department, was one of
the editors of the recently pub-
lished book "Philosophy for the
Future."
The book, sub-titled the "Quest
of Modern Materialism," is an at-
tempt to integrate humanism with
adequate materialism.
4 *
SELLARS contributed the ar-
ticles entitled "Social Philosophy
and the American Scene," and
"Materialism and Human Know-
ing" to the volume.
Sellars is the author of sev-
eral other philosophical books
and editor of the "Philosophy
for the Layman" series.
V. J. McGill of Hunter College,
New York, and Marvin Farber of
the University of Buffalo are co-
editors of the book with Sellars.
Among other contributors are
Prof. Leslie A. White chairman of
the Anthropology'department, Roy
K. Marshall and T. C. Schneiria.
Water Colorists
To Hold Exhibit
The work of Michigan's water
colorists will be on exhibit through
Sunday, July 3, in the West and
South galleries of the University
Museum of Art.
The exhibit, sponsored by the
Michigan Water Color Society and
the Museum of Art, consists of 73
paintings by such well known ar-
tists as Wallace Mitchell of Cran-
brook and Edgar Yaeger of De-
troit.
* * *
WORKS BY Jean Paul Slusser,
professor of drawing and paint-
ing, Paul Haller Jones, instructor
and Arthur H. Simms, '48, are in-
cluded in the exhibit.
Prize winning water colors
which will be shown are: "Pink
Fish" by Mary Jane Bigler; "Star-
lit Ride" by Louise Jansson;
"Church in City" by Paul Haller
Jones; and "Blue Mountains" by
Roberta MacMullan.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 1949
VOL. LIX-No. 1
All notices for the Daily Official
Bulletin are to be sent to the Office
of the Summer Session in typewritten
form by 3:30 p.m. of the day preced-
ing its publication, except on Satur-
day when the notices should be sub-
mitted by 11:30 a.m., Room 3510 Ad-
ministration Building.
Notices
Students in Business Education:
An experimental class for be-
ginners in Thomas System Short-
hand will be offered to interested
students without charge. Miss Elsie
Freitag of Fordson High School,
instructor. Organization meeting
will be held at 4:00 o'clock, Thurs-
day p.m., June 23, in Rm. 268,
Business Administration Bldg.
J. M. Trytten.
There will be a compulsory
meeting of house representatives
Thursday, June 23, at 5:00 in the
League. The room will be posted
on the bulletin board by the main
desk. Please send your house pres-
ident or another representative, as
important notices will be given at
that time, and Dean Mary Brom-
age will speak.
Student Print Loan Collection:
Students interested in obtaining a
picture for the Summer Session
may make their selection at Room
517 (basement), Administration
Building now. The prints will be
assigned and distributed through
June 30th. A rental fee of 35 cents
is charged for each print. The of-
fice is open from 8 to 12 a.m.
and 1 to 5 p.m. daily through Sat-
urday.
The United States Civil Service
Commission announces examina-
tions for Wage-Hour Investigator,
Highway Engineer and Highway
Bridge Engineer, Electronic Sci-
entist, Park Ranger and Trade-
Mark Examiner.
The Corps of Engineers, U.S.
Army Office has a vacancy for a
Junior Petrographer, at the Test-
ing Laboratory in Marietta,
Georgia.
The Civilian Personnel Office,
Chanute Air Force Base, Illinois,
is accepting applications for filling
the following type positions: In-
structor, Cruise Control (Flight
Engineer); Instructor, (Aircraft
Maintenance-Sheet Metal); In-
structor, (Aircraft Maintenance-
Parachute Rigging) ; Instructor,
(Aircraft Maintenance).
The Connecticut State Personnel
Department announces an open
competitive examination for So-
cial Worker.
The City of Detroit Civil Service
Commission announces examina-
tions for the following positions:
Junior City Planner, Intermediate
and Senior City Planner; Social
Case Worker; Chemistry Aid
(Male), Sanitary Chemist (Male);
Junior and Senior Accountant;
Junior and senior Medical Tech-
nologist; and Assistant General
Superintendent of Public Welfare.
Additional information may be
obtained at the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3528 Administration
Building.

The Following Regulations gov-
ern closed social events sponsored
by student organizations during
the summer term:
(a) Approval is required for all
social events sponsored by stu-
dent organizations, graduate
or undergraduate, where both
men and women are present.
(b) Applications for approval are
to be submitted to the Dean
of Students in the Office of
Student Affairs, 1020 Admin.
Bldg. not later than 12 o'clock
noon of the Monday before the
event is to take place. The list
of approved events will appear
in the Daily Official Bulletin
on Wednesday.
(c) The request for approval must
be accompanied by written ac-
ceptances from two sets of
chaperons, preferably two
married couples such as fac-
ulty members, parents of stu-
dents, alumni, or married stu-
dents of sufficiently mature
years. The president of the
sponsoring organization must
indicate his personal endorse-
ment of the chaperons select-
ed by signing the application
before it is presented to the
Dean of Students for approval.
(d) Dances may be held only on
Friday and Saturday nights
during the Summer Session
and must close not later than
12 o'clock midnight.
(e) Women guests in men's resi-
dences are restricted to the
main floor.
(f) No intoxicating beverages
shall be served or consumed at
any function sponsored by an
approved student organiza-
tion.
Office of Student Affairs.
Specific Standards of Conduct,
Regulations of the Committee on
Student Conduct:
(a) The presence of women guests
in men's residences except for
exchange and guest dinners
or for social events or during
calling hours approved by the

Office of Student Affairs, is
not permitted.
(Calling hours in University1
Men's Residence Halls, daily
between 3 p.m.-10:30 p.m.)
Exchange or guest dinners will
be authorized for organized
hotse groups operating a din-
ing room provided they are
held between the hours of
5:30 p.m.-8 p.m. on week days'
and 1 p.m.-3 p.m. on Sundays,
and provided notification is
given the Office of Student
Affairs at least 24 .hours in
advance.
Fraternities without resident
housemothers and fraternities
operating as rooming thouses
during the summer may en-
tertain women guests only at
exchange or guest dinners or
for social events approved by
the Office of Student Affairs.
(b) The use or presence of intox-
icating beverages in student
quarters is not permitted.
Approved student sponsored so-
cial events for the coming week-
end: June 24-Congregational-
Disciples Guild party, Congrega-
tional Church; Graduate Student
Council mixer, Rackham; Mich-
igan Christian Fellowship party,
Island.

June 26 - Hillel Foundation,
open house, 2101 Hill.
LecturesI
Mr. Fred I. Dimock, Chief Cir-
culation Librarian of the General
Library of the University, will give
a special lecture on Thurs., June
23 at 4:15 in the Auditorium of
the University High School on the
topic: "How To Use the Univer-
sity Library." This lecture is
given for all new students of the
University and for other students
or members of the staff who may
wish to attend.
Lecture: "Conflicting Philos-
ophies of American Education." G.
Max Wingo, Assistant Professor of
Education and Principal of the
University Elementary School.
3:00 p.m., Auditorium, University
High School.
Luncheon Conference: "The
History of the Linguistic Insti-
tute." Dr. Hans Kurath, Profes-
sor of English. 12:10 p.m., lunch-
eon, Anderson Rm., Michigan Un-
ion; lecture in Rm. 3D at 1:00 p.m.
American - Canadian Relations
Lecture: "The Canadian North-
land." Lt. Col. P. D. Baird, 7:30
p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Events Today
Phi Delta Kappa: The first in
a series of five Wednesday evening
informal dinner meetings will be
held in the Faculty Dining Room,
Michigan Union, from 6:00 to 7:30,
(Continued on Page 3)

I * 1
S ~rr&T./

Doors Open Daily 1:15 P.M.
NOW & THURS.I
25c 'til 5 P.M.

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No Fuss - No Bother - No Worry
NO PARKING- TROUBLES

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Plus! _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
PRESENTS
SUMMER THEATER ENTERTAINMENT

At 4:10, 6:55, 9:40

DRIVE THROUGH-

CL- -- "r .

t- - arts Th
THIS WEEK
DANCING FRIDAY NIGHT ONLY
at the
LEAGUE BALLROOM
EVERY FRIDAY & SATURDAY AFTER.
THIS WEEK
and his Orchestra
BETH SKIDMORE - VOCALIST
DANCING STAG 65c
9-12 COUPLE 1.25

!ursday

ON BORROWED TIME
" One of the fine imaginative
works of our modern theatre, this
fantasy by Paul Osborn concerns a
boy and his grandfatherwhochase
Death up an apple tree. The com-
bination of humor and pathos
blended skillfully with excellent
character interpretation has mode
On Borrowed Time beloved by
American theatre-goers.
LIFE WITH FATHER
" Holding the record for the long-
est run on Broadway, Life With
Father has been released only re-
cently to non-professional com-
panies. It makes nostalgic com-
edy out of the minor crises of the
Clarence Day family at the turn
of the century, and through it
Father and Mother have become
part of American folk-lore. The
sequel, Life With Mother, also
by Howard Lindsay and Russell
Crouse, is now playing on Broad-
way.
THE GLASS MENAGERIE
* A fortnight after its Broadway
opening, Tennessee Williams' bril-
liant play, The Glass Menagerie,
was voted the New York Drama
Critics' Circle Award for the 1944-
45 season. Seldom has a com-
paratively unknown author receiv-
ed so much acclaim as Williams
for this remarkable "memory
play." His second major drama,
A Streetcar Named Desire, is now
playing on the New York stage.

SUMMER BILL
On Borrowed Time Paul Osborn
July 6-9
Life With Father, Lindsey & Crouse
July 13-16
The Glass Menagerie
Tennessee Williams
July 20-23 ,
The White Steed Paul V. Carroll
Thursday and Friday, July 28, 29
Special Summer Offering
THE TROJAN WOMEN
by EURIPIDES
a famous Greek play performed
by students of the Department
of Speech in an out-of-doors
setting. This play is not includ-
edtin the season tickets.
Admission will be free.
August 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8
La Boheme Giacomo Puccini
In Conjunction with School of Music
All Performances at 8 P.M.
Season Tickets
NOW!
Complete Season
$5.70-$4.50-$3.30, tax inc.
Box office open
10 A.M. - 5 P.M.

THE WHITE STEED
* Mr. Whitford Kane, disting-
uished Broadway and Hollywood
character actor, will act once more
the role which he created in this
country. Through The White Steed
and Shadow and Substance, Paul
Vincent Carroll has established
himself as the leading interpreter
of modern Irish life. This play con-
trasts the puritanical and liberal
elements in the Irish clergy.
THE TROJAN WOMEN
" As a supplement to the Univer-
sity's summer program on "Civili-
zdtion of Ancient Greece and
Rome," the Department of Speech
will present Gilbert Murray's trans-
lation of The Trojan Women. The
production will be given on the
steps of the Clements Lilbrary.
Professor Murray said of this great
tragedy, "It is perhaps, in Euro-
pean literature, the first great ex-
pression of the spirit of pity for
mankind exalted into a moving
principle."
LA BOHEME
* For the fifteenth consecutive
season, the School of Music will
collaborate with the Department
of Speech in the production of
opera. La Boheme is the most
popular opera by the great Italian
composer, Giacomo Puccini, and is
in the standard repertory of every
important opera house in the world.
It recounts the alternately gay and
sad life of the bohemian Left Bank
in Paris.

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JPPL IES b
EPAIRED
SCHOOL
SUPPLIES
NOTE BOOKS
BRIEF CASES
FOUNTAIN PENS
Correspondence
Stationery
G. 1. REQUISITIONS ACCEPTED

NEW STUDENTS-You may take ad-
vantage of a special reduced student
rate on TIME-less than 10c a week.
For complete information telephone
TIME's student-run agency. Student
Periodical Agency. Phone 6007, 9 to
5:30. )
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )
HOT WEATHER SPECIAL - With an
easy to manage new permanent wave,
cut and styled especially for you, you
can beat the summer heat. Our regu-
lar $15 permanent waves now $10.
$12.50 now $8.50. Rainey's Beauty
Salon, 1031 E. Ann. Air-conditioned.
Ph. 2-3725. Open evenings by ap-
pointment. ) 32P
FOR RENT
TWO-ROOM SUITE for 2 men avail-
able half block from Rackham. Call
2-8754 or stop at 1034 E. Huron. )3
WANTED
BOARDERS for Summer Session. Beta
Theta Pi, 604 So. State, Ph. 2-3144. )7

BABY SITTER-Lady student or vets
wife, Mon., Fri., 2 hrs. daily. Phone
2-2035. )10
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SALE
NEW BROWN jodphur riding boots.
Ladies size 6. Call 5108. )9
USED MODERN PHYSICIANS office
equipment. Dr. G. R. Landy, Cad-
illac, Mich. )8
MEN'S BICYCLE in good condition.
Call 2-8612 after 5:00 p.m. n 5
ROOMS
FOR RENT
WHERE ARE the married couples who
want a room for summer session? We
have some. Cooking allowed. Phone
2-7133 or call at 1021 Hili St. )6
EXCELLENT RQOMS for men, 2 blocks
from Bus. Ad. School. 952 Greenwood.
Phone 2-3061. )4

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FOR EXCELLENT FOOD AT
LOW PRICES
J. D. MILLER'S
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211 South State Street
SERVING 3 MEALS A DAY
(except Sunday)
Breakfast ........ 7:00 - 9:15
Lunch ..........11:30- 1:30

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