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June 29, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-06-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIX

TIE MIChIGAN DAIIY

__________________________________________ U I -

New Freighter
678 Feet Long
Is Launched
'U' Facultymen Get
Credit for Research
LORAINE, 0., - (P) - A new
queen of freshwater ships --678
feet long-was launched here yes-
terday.
In a matter of some 10 seconds
the huge ore carrier, Wilfred Sykes
rode sidewise down the timbers of
the launching ways into the flood-
ed rdydock of the American Ship-
building Co. yards.
* * *
CREDIT for establishing the
practicality of building a mam-
moth ship such as the' Sykes-
carrying 5,600 tons more than any
other Great Lakes carrier afroat
-goes to two University of Mich-
igan professors. Prof. Louis A.
Baier and Prof. Charles W. Spoon-
er, Jr., provided data for the con-
struction from tests run in the
University's naval test tank.
-The long hull thrust the waters
upward in a great silver arc.
She rocked backward, then
pushed across the close-fitting
drydock for a bump made gentle
by the tug of restraining cables.
"A very smooth launching,"
veteran shipbuilders said.
NEARLY 2,000 invited guests
were crammed into the shipyards.
On the Black River bank opposite
the drydock and from the upper
floors of nearby buildings some
5000 other onlookers saw the big
ship leave the seven-foot-high keel
blocks where she has been under
construction since last November.
There were no speeches.-only
the, "I christen thee, Wilfred
Sykes," voiced by Mrs. Wilfred
Sykes, the slender, black-gowned
woman whose honor it was to
spatter a beribboned champagne
bottle against the streamlined
hull.
Wilfred Sykes is chairman of
the Inland Steel Co. of Chicago,
the firm for which the new queen
of the Lakes will be hauling iron
ore next season.
TODAY THE shipyard's power-
ful cranes will lower boilers and
the 7,000 horsepower geared tur-
bine drive into the hull. It will
take about three months to pre-
pare the vessel for her trial runs.
The Sykes is the first new ore
ore carrier on the threat Lakes
since early World War IL Her
length is 678 feet, beam of 70
feet and molded depth of 37 ft.
The largest freighter now on the
lakes are 640 feet long.
Designed to carry 20,000 tons of
the red dirt of the Mesabi ranges
at a top speed of 16.5 miles an
hour, she will be the fastest bulk
cargo ship on the Lakes. Her con-
struction cost is estimated unoffi-
cially, at about$5,000,000.

CYCLIST ENDS CROSS-COUNTRY RIDE-George F. French,
III, 19 year old Princeton senior, holds up twin bottles of water
after driving his bicycle into the Pacific Ocean at Santa Monica,
Calif., to end a coast-to-coast bike ride that began at Asbury Park,
N.J. One bottle contains Atlantic Ocean water and the other-
newly-filled - Pacific water.
BROAD INTERPRETATION :
,Student Drivers Confused
By One Little Word --'ermit'

Exploitation
Causes Loss
Of Resources
Rosecrats Blames
Epoch of Indifference
Indifference to conservation has
caused more deterioration of land
and forests in the United States
in 250 years than has been caused
by several thousand years of land
use in Europe.
This charge was made by W. S.
Rosecrans, vice-president of the
United States Chamber of Com-
merce,,who Monday night opened
the Summer Session lecture series
on "Natural Resources in World
Affairs."
* * *
ROSECRANS, who is also chair-
man of the California State Board
of Forestry, spoke on the topic
"Under All, the Land."
* "Paralleling the exploitation
of our forests and farm land
came .the development of our
minerals," 1z said. Again, the .
"attitude of indifference to con-
,servation was apparent. Very
few until recently could envision
any scarcity of natural re-,
sources."
This "epoch of prodigality" is
now at an end, the lecturer
warned.
* * *
HE LISTED various natural re-
source problems facing Americta
now and in the future, including
among them the problem of the
147,527,000 American people who
will determine the solution of all
our problems.
Rosecrans will outline possible
solutions to America's natural re-
sources problems when he delivers
the second of the series of public
affairs lectures at 4:15 p.m. to-
morrow in Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Pratt Lecture
Scheduled Today
Prof. Edwin J. Pratt of the Uni-
versity of Toronto will deliver a
lecture on "Recent .Canadian Fic-
tion and Poetry" at 7:30 p.m. to
day in the Rackham Amphithea-
tre.
The lecture is the second in
the summer series on Canadian-
American relations.
Prof. Pratt has been the lead-
ing poet of Canada for the past
two decades. Since 1923 he has
published 15 volumes of verse.
In recognition of his work as a
poet and teacher, he was elected
a fellow of the Royal Society of
Canada in 1930. In 1941 he was
awarded the Lorne Pierce Gold
Medal of the Royal Society.

ASSOCIATED

PUCTURE NEWS

PRESS

P R O T E C T I V E MA M M A -Susan, Australian swan,
swims with cygnets, Wynken, Blinken and Nod, at Catalina Island.'

M ! N I S T E R - P E R F 0 R M ER - The Rev. Johnstone.
Beech (above) Episcopal rector, is newest clown in Gainesville.,
Texas, community circus which recently opened its,20th season.'

By PAUL BRENTLINGER
Differences of opinion over the
meaning of the word "permit" in
signs on restricted campus park-
ing lots cause much confusion in
the minds of student drivers, ac-
cording to John P. Gwin of the
Office of Student Affairs.
It seems that parking lot signs
inform drivers that parking is
restrictedtothose holding "per-
mits." This word "permits" refers
to parking permits given to cer-
tain faculty and staff members.
* * *
THE SIGNS, however, do not
specify what sort of a permit they
mean.
Since the Office of Student
Kerr Gets $5,000
Dr. Leonard A. Scheele, United
States surgeon-general, announc-
ed that Dr. Donald A. Kerr of the
University's dental school has
been granted $5,000 to be used for
a year's dental research in cancer.
The money, the top amount al-
lowed for such grants, is part of
the $81,439 allocated through the
National Cancer Institute to 36
of the nation's 40 dental schools.

Affairs issues driving "permits"
to student drivers, the drivers
have a tehdency to give the
parking lot sign word "permit"
a broad interpretation, thereby
finding themselves faced with
the prospect of paying a park-
ing fine.
Summer school students are eli-
gible for a recreational driving
permit, which is not available dur-
ing the fall and spring semesters.
The recreational permit is de-
signed to enable students to
take advantage of recreational
facilities which are offered away
from Ann Arbor.
Since there is no mileage limi-
tation with it, students possessing
a recreational permit are free to
drive any distance in order to
participate in swimming, boating
or other warm-weather activities.
* * *
Otherwise, driving regulations
are exactly as they were during
the regular academic year. All
students not exempt from the reg-
ulations muwt report to the Office
of Student Affairs to register their
vehicles and receive their driving
permits.

D AK.DRA KR 5DK I f K U U TS...Barbara
Stanwyck greets her brother, Byron Stevens, who is making his
Hollywood screen debut in her picture, "File on Thelma Jordan."

S T R O N G 4S C R E E N -Nurse Dorothy Bell .and architect
Adrian Wilson demonstrate a new screen for Los Angeles County
Hospital. The screen gives half an inch under 150-pound impact.

I .

SUVMEIR
DIRECTORY

4

Z 0 0 P R U N I N G - Fred Ulmer, curator at the Phila-
delphia Zoo, prunes the horn of Kifaru, the rhino, with keepers
John Regan and Pat Minichini, who finished operation with shears.

: k.

*

;1 N S P E C T I 0 N-Bun, mascot of the Grand Crossing police
station, Chicago, checks office'rs at inspection of summer uniforms.

THURSDAY

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