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June 29, 1949 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-06-29

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WVEDNE SDAY, JUNE 29, 1949
Foreign Languages, Culture
Available in Summer Houses

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

f

By MIRIAM CADY
Anyone with an interest in ac-
quiring fluency in languages this
summer need not travel but can
supplement classroom work with
living arrangements at the French,
German and Spanish houses.
Groups living and boarding at
these houses range from majors
in those fields to freshmen hav-
ing just begun the languages and
foreign students with hazy mem-
ories for neighboring tongues.
All conversation at these houses
is in -the chosen language. House
directors are chosen not only for
fluency of speech but a gift for
conversation and the ability to
encourage others to participate.
LA MAISON FRANCAISE, lo-
cated at 1027 E. University, has
17 residents and limited boarders.
Mlle. Jeanne Rosselet, an associate
professor of French at Gouchar
College, is the directress while the
Hostess Posts
Open at League
Dance lessons are available
through the League not only to
men but to women who will serve
as partners.
Women acting as partners or
hostesses are admitted to the
dances free and also learn the
latest steps while acquiring League
activity points.
Hostesses may still apply for
dance classes held at 7 p.m. and
8:30, p.m. on Tuesdays. Interested
women may contact the Under-
graduate Office of the League or
Nancy Finch in the New Dorm.
Hostesses are needed for the
regular Friday and Saturday night
League-sponsored dances, another
activity which freed admission
and League points for partici-
pants. Those who are interested
in these dances may contact Jo
Collins, 2-0718.

householdhmanager is Mrs. Pauline
Elliott who also supervises the
running of the Spanish house.
Residents and boarders including
students from China, Porto Rico,
Greece and Switzerland make for
a cosmopolitan air themselves.
Linguistic fellow Ruth Hirsch
directs Deutches Haus at 1101
Church, managed by Mrs. B. P.
Bagrow. Seven women make up
the residents, while ten Spanish
speakers live at the Casa Espag-
nole, the Mary Markley house of
regular sessions. Director Mrs.
Genevieve Lyon was in charge
last summer of the joint French
and Spanish house.
Each house has men and women
boarders as well as various guests
for table conversation. Those in-
terested in taking their meals at
any of the houses on a special or
regular basis may contact the
managers.
* * *
SOCIAL ACTIVITIES are also
being planned by residents. Agen-
das include open houses or teas
at which guests will be expected
to use the language of the house.
Faculty members are daily guests
for meals.
Emphasis also is on the cul-
ture and costumes of the coun-
tries. Songs, games, posters,;pic-
for tures, books and records all
make for a more Frenchy, Span-
ish or German atmosphere.,
Last summer marked the revival
of the language house plan since
the war, with an expanded' pro-
gram coming in this year Future
use of the language housing-
boarding system depends upon, the
enthusiasm and interest shown
according to Mrs. Mary C. Bro-
mage, Associate Dean of Women.
Stoves Advance
HELENA, Mont. - More and
more small kitchens are featuring'
built-in ranges with separate-unit
ovens, according to local house-
wives.

Student Nurses
Solve Baffling
Problems Daily
How would you teach a person
to gargle?
This is just one of the baffling
problems that are solved every day
by the University of Michigan stu-
dent nurses.
Many people know very little
about these students who are
among the busiest people on cam-
pus. One fact that is frequently
mistaken is that they belong to
the University of Michigan School
of Nursing and are not students
of the University Hospital, al-
though they hold many of their
classes there.
* * *
FRESHMAN STUDENT nurses
have most of their classes on cam-
pus with the exception of the time
they spend "on the floor." This is
when they gain practical experi-
ence by working in the hospital
wards.
During their first semester,
student nurses spend about two
hours a week in the wards, do-
ing simple procedures such as
making beds, giving backrubs
and baths, and making patients
comfortable.
During second semester the time
spent in the wards is increased
to six hours and by the time they
are seniors, they spend a total of
more than forty hours a week in
classes and floor duty.
* * *
THE PLAN of the school is to
begin with simple nursing proce-
dures and graduately progress to
more complicated ones. The stu-
dents are first taught the medical
part of a disease or injury-the
symptoms, treatment and cure.
Then they learn the nursing pro-
cedures.
Before they may take care of
a hospital patient, the student
nurses practice on each other.
"This is partly to learn how the
patient feels," says one junior in
nursing school. Students must give
each other hypodermics, eye lu-
brications, baths, and even a
shampoo!
* ~* *
THIS OFTEN proves to be hu-
morous. Qne student was lying
down while gargling when she
saw another student laughing. She
promptly started to laugh, spray-
ing water all over herself and the
distressed student nurse beside her
who was trying to pass a test in
bedside procedure!
One of the most interesting
parts of nursing to some of the
students is assisting at opera-
tions. "You're too rushed to be
sick. You just concentrate on
the many things there are to
do," stated one prospective
nurse. "It's terribly dramatic,"
said another.
Although they work hard, the
student nurses think it is worth all
the headaches and sore feet. One
student summed up the feelings
of most of them by saying, "I of-
ten feel discouraged, but when I
look back on some of the things
I've done I feel very proud to be
a student nurse."
New Thermostat
CHLORIDE, Ariz.-31 turns of
temperature-resistant wire on a
plastic spool constitute the sensing
element of a new electronic ther-
mostat, according to a local hard-
ware store.

BEAUTY AND THE-ER THE STRONG MAN-Shirlee Tegge of
Iron River, Mich., was acclaimed "Miss U.S.A." in Los Angeles for
having a perfectly proportioned body, and (right) John C. Grimek
of York, Pa., was named "Mr. U.S.A." because he is as healthy
as he looks. The contest was open to all.

DUM DUM DEE DUM:

Weddings Pose Gilft Problems

Coed 'Gobs'
Hoist Sails
For 'U' Club
By BETTY MONCRIEFF
"Hardly, we're going to jib! Here
comes a puff of wind. Get ready
to hike out on the gunw'll, or we'll
capsize!
What? Oh no, it's not Greek. It's
only a bit of sea language which
can be heard among the active
members of the Michigan Sailing
Club.
The Club, which recently played
host to Yale, Brown, Harvard,
Kings Point, California, North-
western, and Ohio Kesleyan, in
the National Intercollegiate Din-
ghy Championship Contest at
Whitmore Lake, meets every Wed-
nesday in the Engineering Build-
ing. (The specific time will appear
in the DOB). The purpose of the
club is to have lots of fun.
* * *
ALTHOUGH three quarters of
the members are men, the women
are very essential to the club and
are eligible to hold any office, ac-
cording to Red Oppenheimer, sec-
retary of the Sailing Club. The
feminine touch is needed to sew
sails, buoy marks, and varnish
boats. Miss Oppenhiemer, who re-
cently sailed for Michigan with
Jim Johns, says that the women
hope to hold their own races in
the near future.
The Club House at Whitmore
is open all week, but most of
the activity is held during the
weekends when the members go
swimming and sailing all day,
picnic at night, and end the
weekend with a party.
Membership ranges from be-
ginners to experienced men like
Ed Bainbridge, who is the main
instructor. New members first
must be able to swim fifty yards
before attending Shore School,
where they learn how to handle
sailboats, and later pass a
Skipper's test.
Activity does not stop after the
summer months are past. In the
winter the members go ice-boating
and skating. It's colder, but easier
and faster on ice, and everyone
has lots of fun.
Foreign Center
To Sponsor Tea
The second in a series of weekly
teas will be held from 4:30 to 6
p.m. tomorrow at the International
Center.
The teas, sponsored by the In-
ternational Center, are open to all
foreign students and their Amer-
ican friends. Guests are given an
opportunity to converse in any for-
eign language.
The hostess for this week will
be Mrs. Robert B. Klinger.
Bridge Group Still
Open to Players
Bridge enthusiasts with any
amount of experience can still find
openings for instruction with the
Intermediate Bridge Class spon-
sored by the League.
Lessons are given to this class
by Mrs. McLean at 8:30 p.m. to-
day and every Wednesday. Mimeo-
graphed copies of the first lesson
are available for those who missed
it.

Now Under
NE W MANAGEMENT
Serving
SUNDAY DINNERS
11:30 A.M. to 3:30 P.M. (Reg. Weekday Prices)
WEEKDAYS (MON. thru FRI.)
11 to 2, 5 to 7:30 P.M. Closed Sat. All Day
A PLEASANT PLACE TO DINE

J acok/son>L
BLUE
YELLOW
WHITE
GREEN
PINK
BLACK

r r

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OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!
TEMPLE CAFETERIA

0Inn ... ....

MASONIC TEMPLE

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As well as being the month of
weddings, June is also the month
of the less popular counterpart-
racking one's purse and brain for
gifts for the happy couple.
Gifts can range from salt and
pepper shakers to automobiles andj
homes, but most people prefer
something in between these price
ranges.
Always acceptable and most
popular are gifts of china, crystall
and sterling in the bride's pattern
which is usually registered in her
home town. Next in line are linens
which can be either simple lunch-
eon cloths and guest towels that
can be bought at the last minute
or fine linens which call for -a
monogram and should be ordered
well in advance to allow time for
monograming work which may
have to be sent away.

ALTHOUGH GIFTS are always
sent to the bride, special friends
of the bridegroom may have him
in mind when selecting their gift
and make it something definitely
masculine such as pipe racks or
bar accessories.
Personal gifts to the bride
such as lingerie are usually re-
served for showers of that type
or very intimate friends, while
the actual wedding present is
brought with a view toward the
new home that is to be estab-
lished.
Luxuries which the couple will
not buy themselves are in the best
taste for the newly married, but
this does not include several va-
rieties of vases. Unless the guests,
know well the tastes of the couple
and style of home and furniture.
they plan, it is wise to steer shy
of the home decoration fields.

V.
/ A 4 J
1.
(
! 'sa

Will 0' Wijp4
... By LUCILLE DONALDSON

Easy-to-care-for, lone to wear
BRIEF NYLON PANTIES
What could be better for summer than nylon?
It washes and drys in minutes, weighs less than
four ounces of cool comfort, gives you long wear
far beyond its tiny cost. Pick an armful of colors*

The Summer Session of the
Willow Village Community Center
will be from June 20 through Au-
gust 12. All those interested in
working on any committee please
contact the membership chairman,
Mrs. MacEwan, 1019 E. Harwick
Ct.
* * *
THE FACULTY WIVES club
voted to change the name of their
group to the "University Club."
Plans for the club this summer
include weekly meetings, alternat-
ing a week-day picnic with the
mothers and children at noon,
with a bridge night for the mem-
bers during the other week, at the
University Community Center.
The specific dates will be ar-
ranged at the board meeting,
which will be held at & p.m. Mon-

day, June 27, in the University
Community Center.
*, * *
THE CERAMICS GROUP will
mee.t every Thursday, without in-
struction, throughout the Summer
Session. A fee of one dollar for the
term is asked of each member, plus
a kiln fee of two dollars of all new
members.
The other Studio Workshop
Groups are the Metal Work, which
will meet at 8 '.m. on Thursday
every week, and the Textile Paint-
ing, which will meet at the same
time.

Sizes 5, 6, 7.

$2

Intimate Apparel

Read and Use Daily Classified Ads
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weekending ..

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If'ahddI ,
pre-Fourth
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