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June 29, 1949 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-06-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

- THE M4CHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 1949

._._

r" I

CENTS LEFT OVER:
'Grand Tour' of Europe
Can Be Done for $1,314

By MARY RUTTER
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - (/P) -
Thinking about a trip abroad and
wondering if you can afford it?
You can do the "grand tour"
now at a cost of about $29.00 a
day if you are careful.
I HAVE just returned from a
44-day trip through England,
Scotland, France, Switzerland and
Italy. It cost me $1,314.18.
In return, I got a. swell sun-
tan, some priceless photos, a lib-
eral education and enough mem-
ories to last me well through the
rocking chair era.
I had just 29 cents in my purse
after I paid off the taxi at home.
The rest of my bank account had
been disbursed as follows:
$338.00-round trip tourist-class
rboat fare.
$703.96-Hotels, meals, trains,
sightseeing trips, entertainments.
$102.72-Tips.
$134.00-Gifts and souvenirs.
'52-20' Campaign
An open meeting to plan a cam-
paign for the extension of the
52-20 program for veterans, will
be held under.the auspices ofthe
Young Progressives at 7:30. tonight
at the League.

$17.50-Traveller's and baggage
insurance. *
I HAD A week in London, three
days in Edinburgh, nine days in
Earis, two days on the Riviera,
three days in Rome, and side trips
to such places as the French cha-
teaus of Versailles and Fontaine-
Bleu, the Trossachs of Scotland,
Shakespeare's home at Stratford-
on-Avon, and the lovely English
lake country.
Be sure to stick some choco-
late in your suitcase if you like
sweets. It is scarce in England
and expensive on the continent.
The French National tourist of-
fice's latest estimate of hotel rates
ranges from $2.00 to $10.00 for
single with bath. Mine in Paris
cost from $2.50 to $3.50. Like a
hot of tourists in France, I us-
ually found that the elusive "room
with bath" had already been tak-
en, and that my bath was "down
the hall." My hotel room in Lon-
don was $3.10 per day and it was
nice.
Entertainment costs in Europe
are a happy surprise. I saw the old
Vic repertory company, London's
finest, with Sir Laurence Olivier
and Vivian Leigh, for about $3.20
in one of the best seats in the
house.

Loan Library
Offers Sale
Of Textbooks
Books, books, all sorts of books
will go on sale this afternoon at
bargain prices.,
The occasion is the Textbook
Loan Library's sale of texts and
other books which were formerly
assigned for University courses.
but which are no longer officially
used.
The sale will take place from
12:30 to 4:30 p.m. today in 1025
Angell Hall, not in 1204 Angell
Hall, as The Daily erroneously re-
ported several days ago.
The sale offers students and fac-
ulty members an excellent oppor-
tunity to buy supplementary ref-
erence books at a nominal cost.
In addition, many books contain-
ing masterpieces of literature
whiQh were studied in English and
other language courses will be of-
fered for sale.
Engineers, scientists, linguists
and business administrators will
find some invaluable reference
material among the books which
the loan library offers in today's
sale.

LOS ANGELES. - OP - Serve
yourself gas stations are facing
some mighty stubborn opposition,
but their low prices are boosting
sales volume.
In just two years the stations
where youtdo all your own work
in gassing-up have mushroomed in
Southern California and extended
to a number of other states.
SINCE GEORGE R. URICH op-
ened the first "gaseteria" in East
Los Angeles, operators have fol-
lowed the lead to the extent that
southern California now has near-
ly 100 self-service stations, and
trade sources estimate there are
that many more throughout the
country.
Opposition to the cut-rate
movement comes mostly from
established filling station oper-
ators. The new-type station has
Square Dancing
The Graduate Outing Club will
continue its classes on Square
Dancing from 8 to 10 p.m. today,
in the Women's Athletic Building.
6 Caller will be Dave Palmer,
Grad.

been banned or restricted in 11
states and a number of munici-
palities by law.
Directors of the American Pe-
troleum Institute, an industry or-
ganization, several months ago
adopted a resolution disapproving
of the new stations "as a menace
to the petroleum industry's proud
safety record."
* * *
SPOKESMEN for some of the
major petroleum companies say
they have taken no stand in the
matter themselves on a national
basis. They prefer to wait and see
the trend more clearly before com-
ing out with a public position
either for or against.
Los Angeles itself and nine
other California cities have out-
lawed the new look in gas and

SUPERIOR GASETERIA?
Serve-Self Gas Stations Face Fight

oil marketing; but in Los An-
geles County the movement is
thriving and doing great busi-
ness.
"I'd never go back to the old
way of operating," says Urich,
who now has eight stations and
plans 10. "Last month my serve-
urself stations pumped 1,500,000
gallons.
Dawson To Speak
Professor John P. Dawson of
the law school will be guest speak-
er at the first in a series of "bull
sessions" sponsored by the campus
Young Democrats at 7:30 p.m.
tomorrow night at the Union.
Dawson will speak on the Dem-
ocratic party, its principles, pres-
ent position and future activities.

MERCURY HITS 97, AND LOOK WHAT HAPPENS-When Offi-
cer Kenneth Booth responded to a report that a couple of nudists
were cavorting around a backyard in Los Angeles he never
thought the "case" would end like this. But with the temperature
hitting 97, who could blame him? The nudists are Terry Ann
Goldman and Dickie Watson.

Riding Horses For Hire
EXCEPTIONALLY FINE
NEW HORSES
Instructions Available
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Golfside Stables
-G3250 E. GNE R AND, Mgr.
35E.Huron River Dr. Ph. 7772

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

THE PEN HOSPITAL
"Doc" Rider - Resident Surgeon
All Makes Repaired & Reconditioned
Official Parker & Sheaffer Service
A Loan Pen If You Need It
PROMPT SERVICE

RAD[E'S

115 W. Liberty St.
Near Main St.

A
ml

TODAY

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35c until 5 P.M.

Ff f -
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r-,

All notices for the Daily Official
Bulletin are to be sent to the Office
of the Summer Session in typewritten
form by 3:30 p.m. of the day preced-
ing its publication, except on Satur-
day when the notices should be sub-
mitted by 11:30 a.m., Room 3510 Ad-
ministration Building.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 1949
VOL. LIX.-No. 6S
Notices
Approved student sponsored so-
cial events for the coming week-
end: July 2-Hostel Club, Square
dance, W.A.B.; Phi Delta Phi, Rec-
ord dance, 502 E. Madison; Robert
Owen Cooperative House, Party,
1017 Oakland.
July 3-Hawaii Club, Picnic,
Island.
DRIVING REGULATIONS FOR
SUMMER SESSION 1949
There are certain individuals to
whom these rules do not apply.
These persons include: students
who are over 26 years of age, those
who in the previous year have en-
gaged in professional pursuits
such as lawyers, doctors, dentists,
teachers, nurses, those holding
faculty rank of teaching fellow or
above and married students.
All other student drivers must
report to Mr. Gwin or Mrs. Saw-
yer in the Office of Student Af-
fairs where they may obtain spe-
cial permits which will enable
them to use their cars for purposes
which are deemed necessary. Any
student may secure a summer per-
mit for recreational use in order
to participate in such outdoor ac-
tivities as golf, tennis, swimming,
boating, etc.
It is to be remembered that
DRIVING PERMITS are NOT
PARKING PERMITS and conse-
quently do not give students the
privilege of parking in restricted
parking areas.
Student drivers are reminded
that their driving: tags or "M"
stickers secured in the Office of
Student Affairs are NOT PARK-
ING PERMITS and do not give
them permission to park in the
restricted campus parking lots.
These restricted areas, so desig-
IIcnccomo
O Official Michigan Rings
O Michigan mugs and
souvenirs
O Medals, Cups and Trophies
O Fraternity Jewelry 1
Hours 12:30 to 5:30, Mon.-Fri.
L. G. Balfour Co.
1319 S. niversity Ph. 9533
l;= o<->o<-=>o<--yoc<--yor

nated by means of signs at the
entrance to the lots, are reserved
for faculty and staff personnel
of the rank of instructor or above
and disabled students, who have
received parking permits from
the office of the Secretary of the
University. Persons parking in
these lots illegally or improperly
are notified by means of a card
which is placed on the windshield.
Beginning June 29, fines will be
imposed for using these restricted
areas without proper permission.
First offenses will bring a fine of
$1.00, second offenses $2.00 and
third offenses $3.00 along with
possible loss of driving privileges.
Students may park in the fol-
lowing areas at any time as long
as their cars are parked properly
and do not block any entrance or
the path of another parked car.
1. East of Univ. Hospital.
2. Catherine St. north of Vaughn
Residence Hall.
3. West Quad. area at Thomp-
son and Jefferson Sts.
4. Michigan Union Area.
5. College St. between East Med.
and East Hall.
6. Lot behind Univ. Museum ad-
jacent to Forest Ave.
7. Any street which is not clos-
ed by police order.
Improper parking in these areas
which are unrestricted will re-
sult in the same penalties as those
listed above.
All students must secure driving
permits before any driving is done
otherwise they are subject to se-
vere disciplinary action. Permits
may be secured in Rm. 1020 of
the Administration Building.
Tickets for "On Borrowed Time"
and all individual plays offered
this summer by the Department
of Speech will be placed on sale
tomorrow morning at 10 a.m. at
the box office, Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater. Season tickets, still avail-
able, are also on sale during the
week. The complete schedule for
the summer drama series is as
follows: June 29-July 2, "On Bor-
rowed Time"; July 6-9 "Life With
Father"; July 13-16 "The Glass
Menagerie"; July 20 - 23 "The
White Steed"; August 3, 4, 5, 6,
and 8 "LaBoheme."
Student Organizations planning

to be active during the summer
session are requested to submit to
the Office of Student Affairs, Rm.
1020 Admin., not later than July
8, the following information: (1)
a list of officers and members, (2)
the acceptance of a member of the
faculty willing to act as adviser
to the group. ORGANIZATIONS
NOT SO REGISTERED BY JULY
8 ARE ASSUMED TO BE INAC-
TIVE FOR THE SUMMER TERM.
Forms for reporting the required
information may be secured in
Room 1020 Admin.
Sale of Discarded Texts from the
Text Book Loan collection will be
held in Room 1025 Angell Hall on
Wednesday, June 29 from 12:30
to 4:30 p.m.
Graduate Students expecting to
receive the Master's Degree in Au-
gust, 1949, must file a diploma ap-
plication with the Recorder of the
Graduate School by July 1st if
they have not already done so.
The I. M. Building will be open
to men and women for swimming,
basketball, paddle ball, and bad-
minton on:Friday nights from
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. during the
summer session.
Health Service Eye Testing-
Students wishing eye tests for
glasses are advised to secure early
appointments. Only emenrgency
conditions can be attended after
July 25th.
There will be no classes on July
4th, University holiday.
Lectures

sonic Aerodynamics Dr. W. F. Hil-
ton, Aerodynamicist from the Na-
tional Physical Laboratory at Ted-
dington, England, and Consultant,
Applied Physics Laboratory of
Johns Hopkins University, will lec-
ture on the subject of "Experi-
mental SupersonicAerodynamics"
Thursday, June 30, at 4:15 p.m.,
in the Architecture Auditorium.
Students and faculty of the De-
partments of Mathematics, Engi-
neering Mechanics, and Aeronau-
tical Engineering are invited.
Lecture: June 29, 1:00, Mich-
igan Union. Room 3D: "The Lan-
guage Situation in Modern Greece"
Professor Ralph L. Ward, Yale
University.
Speech Assembly: "From Gas
Footlights to Television." Whit-
ford Kane, professional actor and
director. 3:00 p.m., Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Lecture: "Formation and Utili-
zation of Ketones." Dr. John Bu-
chanan, Assistant Professor of
Physiological Chemistry, Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania. 4:15 p.m.,
Rm. 1300, Chemistry Bldg.
American - Canadian Relations
Lecture. "Recent Canadian Fiction
and Poetry." Dr. Edwin J. Pratt,
Canadian poet, Professor of Eng-
lish at Victoria College, University
of Toronto. 7:30 p.m., Rackham
Amphitheat re.
Lecture: "The Curriculum and
Civic Education." 0. W. Stephen-
son. Associate Professor of the
Teaching of History and Head of
the Department of Social Studies
(Continued on Page 4)

4: 1 Cl

^* .
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-''' .:

W- mqftwpmmm
k

at 1:40 - 4:55 & 8:10
Edmond O'BRIEN
SGeraldine BROOKS
Me-lf, OF

COURSES IN

CLASSES
8 A.M. - 8 P.M. (Monday thru Friday)
8 A.M. - 12 Noon (Saturday)

Doors Open 1:15 P.M.
TODAY & THURSDAYi
Matinee 25c Nights 35c
at 3:15 - 6:30 - 9:45
SQ {.

PehnmahAI! £tudko

g ujite44 and Onaien tal Peath4,
The Early-way method can solve your writing problems.
Service Dept. for All Kinds of Writing -
Greeting Cards, Name Cards, Bookplates

A A A

4021 /2Observatory

Phone 2-8606

11

A:

4 L

I

p
p

vU

ALLIE ARTISTS
PRO DUCTION

"w

IN4 MIS5 FRST STARRING ROLE

LAST THREE DAYS
of our
CLEARANCE SALE
of RCA VICTOR RECORDS
Including a Large Group of Newly
Added Albums at
5Oo OFF
Here Are a Few Examples of the
Tremendous Savings In This Sale
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 6 (Pastoral)
NBC Orchestra under Toscanini
Formerly $7.25 NOW $3.63

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

COOL

--Now Thru Saturday-

Saturday
BOB HOPE
in
"SORROWFUL JONES"

Also
"CIRCUS TOWN"
"THE SINGING DUDE"
NEWS

I

MOZART: Don Giovanni (comple

te)

W $15.88

Glyndebourne Opera Co. under Busch
Formerly $31.75 NO

I'

MEMBERSHIP OPENINGS

SMETANA: The Moldau
National Symphony under Kindler
Formerly $3.50

NOW $1.75

i4 the

* of M. FLYING CLUB

STRAUSS: Two Overtures and Two Waltzes
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Formerly $6.00 NOW $3.00
TCHAIKOYSKY: Piano Concerto
Horowitz with NBC Orchestra under Toscanini
Formerly $6.00 NOW $3.00
These Special Prices Apply Only Three Days, Wednesday,
Thursdav and Friday. The Liberty Music Shod

Meeting June 29th, 7:30 p.m.

1042 East Engineering Bldg.

with~I~VILA ~4I
'1 u III44N --MN WLIMBEDi

i

If

I

11

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