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June 24, 1949 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-06-24

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PA *"X4PTHE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TI

3rne Hurls One-Hitter as

Yanks Halt

Tigers, 12-0

(:h

ipon's Hit in Eighth Only Blow;
igers Drop to T hird in A L Standings

BUSINESS BOOMS:
Forty-Nine Big Season
For Michioan Athletics

NEW YORK-(IP)-The Yankees
Tommy Byrne came within a foot
of pitching a no-hitter last night
as New York humbled the Detroit
Tigers, 12-0. The lefthander hurled
seven hitless innings before short-
stop Johnny Lipon laced out the
lone Tiger safety-a single that
fell one foot fair inside the left
field foul line.
Lipon caught hold of the first
ball pitched in the eighth inning
for his spoiler.
The Yankees' big bat noise was
furnished by Tommy Henrich, who
drove in five runs, two of them
with his 15th home run in the
first inning.
WASHINGTON - (P) - Second
baseman Joe Gordon's leaping
stab of Eddie Robinson's liner with
the tying run on third base and
two out in the ninth preserved a
4-3 victory for Cleveland over
Washington last night before a
crowd of 21,694.
PHILADELPHIA-(P)-A 14 hit
batting attack, which included
Sam Chapman's 'eighth homer of
the year, carried the Philadelphia
Athletics to an easy 11-4 decision
over the Chicago White Sax last
night as rookie southpaw Alex
Kellner chalked up his tenth
pitching triumph.
'Chapman had three other hits,
a double and two singles to pace
the batting barrage against Howie
Judson, who was charged with his
ninth straight defeat, Chick Pier-
etti and Clyde Shoun. The Phila-
delphia outfielder drove in four
runs.
. Kellner served up three home

run balls to Joe Tipton, twice, and
Steven Souchock.
* * *
CINCINNATI - (W)- Lefty Joe
Hatten, who apparently can do no
wrong when he takes the mound
against Cincinnati, whipped the
Redlegs for the third time of the
season yesterday-this time by a
7-2 margin.
The triumph enabled the Dod-
gers to stay a half game ahead of
the second place St. Louis Card-
inals..
Hatten held the Reds to six hits,
but nevertheless was behind by
1-0 until the sixth when Marv
Rackley hit his first major league
home run with Peewee Reese
aboard.
* * *
CHICAGO -(1) - The Boston
Braves pounded five Chicago Cubs
hurlers for 15 hits here yesterday
for a 12-5 triumph that split the
four-game series.
Dutch Leonard was routed with
a four-run blast in the first inn-
ing, in which the big blow was a
three-run homer by Bob Elliott,
his fourth of the season. The
Braves were never headed there-
after.
ST. LOUIS-(A)-The St. Louis
Cardinals made the most of six
hits and four Giant errors yes-
terday to whip New York, 10-6.
Seven of the Card runs were un-
earned.
The victory gave the Cards the
series, three games to one, and
kept them on the heels of the
pace-setting Brooklyn Dodgers,

--

who lead by half a game. Brook-
lyn beat Cincinnati, 7-2.
The Giants outhit St. Louis, 12
to 6, but unsure fielding and loose
pitching in the clutches proved
their undoing.
* * *
PITTSBURGH - () - The
scrappy Philadelphia Phillies pull-
ed a triple play against the Pitts-
burgh Pirates yesterday, then
went on to slam out a 9-3 decision
over the Pirates to give them three
out of four of the serise.
Second baseman Eddie Miller,
who started the three-play killing
in the third inning, hit his sixth
homer of the year with two on in
the sixth when the Phillies scored
five runs after two were out.
* * *
BOSTON - (P) - Rookie left-
hander Maurice McDermott pitch-
ed a three-hit shutout' last night
in steering the Boston Red Sox
to a 7-0 triumph over the St.
Louis Browns. McDermott faced
only 28 batters in winning his
second major league victory. He
walked two and struck out six.
Charles Plans
Another Bout
CHICAGO-(P)-Ezzard Charles
enriched by $53,857.30 and the
NBA share of Joe Louis' vacated
heavyweight crown, yesterday
made plans to meet the winner of
London's Sept. 6 Lee Savold-Bruce
Woodcock fight for the undisputed
crown.
"I'm not going to fight no Gus
Lesnevich," said Jake Mintz, one
of the four managers of the new
champ, "no Joey Maxim. I'm go-
ing to accept the, challenge of the
Savold-Woodcock winner.
"I AIN'T DOING nothing with-
out the okay of the IBC (Inter-
national Boxing Club) or Harry
Markson (New York IBC Boxing
Director)."
Mintz, the lord high execu-
tioner of the English language,
was in superb form as he hop-
ped between cameramen to greet
his victorious "tiger" from Cin-
cinnati.
Charles, wearing a slight patch
over his left eye and an egg-sized
mouse underneath the orb, ap-
peared at a downtown hotel to
accept the Police Gazette belt,
designating him as world champ.
He had little to say, but Mintz
made up for that.
"ABE GREENE (NBA Commis-
sioner), should be commented,"
(sic) he said, "for his magnificent
work in arranging this contest."
Jersey Joe and his manager, Fe-
lix Bocchicchio, who thought they
won the fight, did not show up for
the belt ceremonies. The cagy 35-
year-old veteran from Camden,
N.J. had a severe cut right through
his left upper lip and injured his
right hand midway in the night.
Tee'd Off?
NASHVILLE, Tenn.,-(P)-Luke
Morris, who works in the Belle
Beade Club Golf shop, was talking
to himself yesterday.
Here's why:
"Gimme a dozen golf balls," a
customer ordered.
"Okay, shall I wrap 'em up?"
Morris asked.
"No," was the reply, "just tee
'em up, and I'll drive 'em home."

Nineteen forty-nine has been a
boom year for the Michigan ath-
letic department, but indications
are that 1950 will be even bigger.
A little more than two years ago,
the University of Michigan was
hopelessly buried ufder an ath-
letic debt ranging upwards of
$1,500,000. They are now not only
in the black, but boast a $1,000-
000 surplus which is slated to be
used in the fulfillment of an am-
bitious new building and reno-
vating program.
* * *
TWO HUNDRED and fifty
thousand dollars has been ear-
marked for the addition of 21,000
permanent seats to the Stadium,
which will boost the total seating
capacity to 97,000. This project
will be completed by the end of
August.
Three other jobs also rate top
priority. They include a new ice
rink, a golf clubhouse at the
'U' course, and baseball stands
to replace the time-worn set
now in use.
The new ice rink with 6,000
seats is expected to be completed
Deadline for entries in the
I-M summer softball league is
tomorrow at noon. Teams de-
siring to enter should contact
Don Robinson at the Intra-
mural Building, 8109.
by December, in time for inter-
collegiate hockey play. The links
club house and the baseball stands
are scheduled to be ready before
another season arrives in those
sports.
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR H. 0.
"Fritz" Crisler, in announcing
these facts, pointed out that the
progressive plans of the athletic
department will entail the spend-
ing of at least $8,000,000 during
the next decade.
Don Weir, 'M' ticket manager,
predicts that the Wolverine foot-
ball earnings will easily approach
an all-time highwater mark next

season. Season ticket sales began
June 1, and Weir estimates that
by August 1, 40,000 books will have
been distributed to Michigan grid
fans at $22.80 a throw.
The money made on football
and other major sports is used to
maintain non-profit sports such
as wrestling and gymnastics and
also to subsidize Michigan's exten-
sive intramural program.
Coed Sports
Start Tonight
Co-recreation night, one of the
most popular summer session in-
tramural offerings, will make its
1949 debut tonight, from 7 to 9:30
p.m. in the I-M building.
For summer school students,
wives, friends, and faculty mem-
bers, the program will offer
swimming, badminton, volleyball,
and basketball as main activities.
Gymnastics equipment.-including
the trampoline-are open for use
in the small gymnasium. Facilities
are also available for paddleball,
squash, handball, and golf driv-
ing.
Newt Loken, varsity gymnastics
coach, is in charge of activities.
Locker room facilities will be pro-
vided for all.
The program will continue every
Friday night through the summer
session. All equipment is furnished
by the I-M department.
HAIR STYLES
to Suit Your Features
Hours: 8:30 A.M.-5:30 P.M.
"Keep A-Head of Your Hair"
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State Theater

.."1 ii ,A . w-VAM11 .. v~ * IVJUUA-
ON COMEBACK TRAIL-Rocky Graziano (left), former middle- aels of the Chicago White Sox
weight champion, started his comeback at Wilmington, Del., with in the scramble for the Ameri.
a knockout victory over Bobby Claus of Buffalo, N.Y. Claus is can League's second base posi-
shown hanging over the ropes as the fight ended. tion in the 16th annual all-star
baseball game at Brooklyn's
Read and Use Daily Classified Ads Ebbets Field July 12.

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Lyon & Healy for all-important accessories and school music needs.

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PRE-INVENTORY
SALE

f

Popular Singles
(Jazz)
and
Children's Records
THE RADIO.& RECORD SHOP

NEW and USED
'for all courses
STUDENTSUPPLIES
Special Department for Veterans
MICHIGAN BOOKSTORE
322 South State Street Bob Graham Mgr.

REEDS . . . cane, plastic
alto sax, tenor sax, alto
makers as Ricco, Ciccone

or plastic covered . . . for clarinet,
clarinet, oboe . . . by such famed
and others. 15c and up.

MOUTHPIECES . . . for reed and brass instruments: cornet,
trumpet, trombone, baritone, French horn, bass horn, clari-
nets, saxophones. Conn, Bach, Brilhart, others. 2.50 and up.
MUTES . . . by Shastock, for cornet, trumpet, trombone.
1.00 and up.
CASES AND COVERS for all band and orchestra instruments.
STRINGS AND ACCESSORIES for violin, viola, cello, bass.
SCHOOL MUSIC SUPPLIES
Music blank books.. .10c to 1.25 Folding music stands .......3.75
Music write tablets. . . 25c to 60c Studio stands ...........8.50
Pitch pipes ........ 25c to 2.40 Staff linrs................70c
Music carrying cases-leather, simulated leather .......... 2.00 to 15.00
Tonette, Songflute, Flutophone, Sweetwind................each, 1.00
Genuine Hohner "Marine Band" Harmonica.....................2.50
508 East William St. - Ann Arbor
OPEN MONDAYS 'til 9 P.M.

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Phone 2.0542

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- STATIONERY

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U.S. Navy
"T" SHIRTS
First Ouality

ENGINEERING and ART EQUIPMENT

EII'

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