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August 08, 1949 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-08-08

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MONDAY, =.AUGUST 8, .1949

THE MICHIGAkN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

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Michigan
Story
(Continued from Page 4)
another "first" to its lengthening
list of innovations: after five years
of effort, Dr. Angell achieved a
department of "the science and
art of teaching"-the first teach-
ers' training program in the na-
tion.
A summer school was insti-
tuted in 1894, and brought un-
der the Regents' control in
1900 - the beginning of the
highly successful Summer Ses-
sion we know today.
The modern School of Business
Administration was presaged in
1900 by a course in higher com-
mercial education, and the School
of Forestry and Conservation ex-
isted in embryo form in 1903. To-
day's Graduate School was pre-
ceded by an advanced study pro-
gram in the literary department
in 1892.
* * *
LIKE HIS predecessors, how-
ever, President Angell was not
without problems. When the
Board of Regents bluntly refused
to comply with the Legislature's
request for a course in homeopa-
thic technique in the medical de-
partment, controversy continued
to rage until 1875. Then, at last,
it was suggested that the State
appropriate .funds for a separate
department; the State agreed, Dr.
Angell pronounced the solution
equitable, and the long battle was
over.
In a number of other ways,
too, hie brought new prestige
and organization to the Uni-
versity.
He ably served the country in
a number of important diplomatic
appointments-becoming so popu-
lar while on a mission to China
that large numbers of Chinese
students followed him home to
Michigan.
ALTHOUGH an unfailing friend
of the student, Dr. Angell was not
incapable of administering a
highly effective type of discipline
when the need arose. The stu-
dents' prime weakness at the turn
of the century was their penchant
for violent hazing activity. In this,
as in similar problems, Dr. An-

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gell's approach was direct and
personal-an appeal to the stu-
dents' common sense and feeling
of propriety. And when Dr. Angell
spoke, there were not many who
failed to listen and act.
* * *
Presient Hutchins .. .
The modern history of the Uni-
versity of Michigan began on
June 28, 1910, with the inaugura-
ltion of Henry Burns Hutchins.
He inherited from President
Angell an institution of such sub-
stantial foundation that not even
a World War could do lasting
damage. Nevertheless, the prom-
ise and progress that marked the
first years of President Hutchins'
tnure was destined to be cut short
by events across the Atlantic.
DR. HUTCHINS was the obvious
choice as Angell's successor. A
Michigan graduate-and the first
of her sons, incidentally to be-
come president-he entered pri-
vate law practice. He was later
recalled to succeed Michigan's
most distinguished jurist, Judge
Thomas M. Mooley, as dean of
the law department.
He had also served as acting
president on the several occa-
sions when Angell was off on
diplomatic missions.
Mlile Dr. Angell had skillfully
directed the course of natural pro-
gress, Dr. Hutchins wasted no
time in making a few practical
reforms.
THE UNIVERSITY - and the
literary department particularly--
had become bogged down in a con-
fusing lack of division between
the financial, administrative, and
educational functions. With his
characteristic "firmness without
obstinacy," Hutchins did much to
promote the needed reorganiza-
tion-beginning a task that was
completed later by Presidents
Burton and Ruthven.
It is to Dr. Hutchins credit
that his previous University con-
nections did not in any way
prejudice his judgement as
President, nor dull his admis-
sion of essential change and
progress.
The University's far - flung
alumni organization of today is
the result of his farsighted policy.
Angell's personality and power of
persuasion had made inroads in
the field, and from his adminis-
tration President Hutchins in-
herited a publication, "The Mich-
igan Alumnus," and the young
Alumni Association. Through that
organization, and with his own
extensive travel throughout the
midwest, Hutchins succeeded in
obtaining tangible evidence of
alumni goodwill toward the Uni-
versity. Included among the build-
ings erected during the Hutchins
years which must be credited to
major private donations are the
Observatory, Hill Auditorium,
three women's residences, and
Clements Library. The million-
dollar Michigan Union-the result
of myriad private donations-was
also completed during this period.
THE GENERAL prosperity of
the University was also the result
of Hutchins' compelling messages
to a realisti2 State Legislature. He
succeeded in proving the insuffi-
ciency of the old property tax rev-
enue, and in obtaining generous
additional appropriations.
The present Health Service
plan was instituted under the
Hutchins administration.
Probably the most important
development was the constitution
of the present - day Graduate
School as a distinct, self -adminis-
tering branch of the broadening
University.

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versity history received their ap-
pointments in 1918.
Dr. Hutchins also was instru-
mental in the establishment of
extension courses in key lca-
ties throughout the State, and
in ending a tension of long
standing between the Univer-
sity and the State's smaller col-
leges. At last the University
agreed to accept credits earned
at these schools as admissible to
a degree at Ann Arbor.
These significant things Presi-
dent Hutchins was able to accom-
plish. What greater advances
Michigan might have enjoyed un-
der his leadership can only be
imagined. Halfway through the
Hutchins years, the pressure of a
World War swept across the Mich-
igan campus with terrible sudden-
ness.
ALTHOUGH enrollment im-
mediately declined at an alarming
rate and costs took an upward
swing, President Hutchins mir-
aculously succeeded in preserving
Michigan's high academic stan-
dards. But the University was to
sustain widespread damage of an-
other sort.
For months there was ungod-
ly noise, confusion, and destruc-
tion on the campus. In addition
to the inexcusable lack of order
in the activities of the Army,
there was the construction of
the Union on one hand, and the
razing of the beloved old library
building on the other. The tra-
dition bound campus was criss-
crossed with slit trenches and
telephone pole obstacle areas.
The Student Army Training
Corps grew to include thousands,
and barracks were improvised
everywhere-in the unfinished
Union, in Waterman gym, and
even out of doors.
The Army, under the command
of one Captain Durkee, ruthlessly
and unnecessarily tore the cam-
pus apart. Drillmasters ordered
their units to completely ignore
the plans and instructions of the
administration and faculty, under
penalty of court martial. The cam-
pus Naval units, meanwhile, mov-
ed quietly and efficiently to com-
plete their programs.
HENRY HUTCHINS sadly
watched Captain Durkee's havoc
replace dignity and order on the
Michigan campus. But the worst
trial was yet to come.
The University, with the rest
of the nation, was ravaged by
an exceedingly virulent epidem-
ic of "Spanish Flu"-a disease
that could bring death to its
victims in a matter o fhours.
President Hutchins, aging vis-
ibly under the stress of one of
the greatest crises in the entire
Michigan story, was pathetically
overwhelmed. The full medical
force of the University was call-
ed into day and night action,
and the entire community was
ordered to wear gauze face
masks.
Thanks to the untiring efforts
of Michigan's doctors and student
nurses, the seige-serious as it
was-was prevented from becom-
ing a disaster of even greater pro-
portions.
The final death toll in Ann Ar-
bor-57 students, two nurses, and
58 townspeople.
* * *
AT LAST THE epidemic-and
then the war-ended as suddenly
as it began.
President Hutchins went into a
well-earned retirement on March
12, 1919.
President Burton.,,.
At the beginning of the Twen-
ties, the University of Michigan
faced a problem that could be
postponed no longer - a severe

lack of physical facilities.
And in 1920 - as in the past -
Michigan was blessed with a presi-
dent perfectly qualified to cope
with the particular problems his
years held. Marion LeRoy Bur-
ton, past president of Smith Col-
lege and the University of Min-
nesota, was precisely the orderly,
realistic and forceful administra-
tor that was needed.
PRESIDENT BURTON'S ad-
ministration began with several
striking improvements in the Uni-
versity's administrative organiza-
tion.

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