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August 08, 1949 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-08-08

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PAGE FOMT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

R
_.

Tom and Meredith Suckling
of the
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"HOME OF THE OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RING"
Welcome you to Michigan
13 sFRATERNITY JEWELRY
MEDALS AND TROPHIES
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Michigan
Story
(Continued from Page 3)
of 1863-64 at Michigan approach-
ed, a rather hapless figure found
himself in the President's office.
Prof. Erastus Otis Haven-who
had taught at the University for
four years-was appointed simul-
taneously with the stormy dis-
missal of President Tappan. He
immediately developed-and with
no little justification-a mild per-
secution complex, which seems to
have followed him throughout his
years in office.
AS SOON AS Haven assumed
the position, he was confronted
with scores of indignation rallies
andpan'avalanche of mail over
Tappan's dismissal. With admir-
able restraint, he quieted the up-
roar by holding up the future of
the University as the first essen-
tial consideration of all concern-
ed.
In orderly fashion, he pre-
sented student petitions for
Tappan's reinstatement to the
Regents, who-after due consid-
eration-denied them:
"It is not consistent with the
best interests of the students,"
said the Board, "that petitions
should be entertained by the
Board from students, with re-
gard to the government of the
University . ..
We may probably credit Presi-
dent Haven for the subsequently
high enrollment at the University,
and for a corresponding expan-
sion in facilities. It was at this
time that the Regents prevailed
upon the citizens of little Ann Ar-
bor to raise funds for an addition
to the Medical Building. The vil-
lagers-in typical demonstration
of their pride in the town's first
industry-provided the funds.
* * *
PRESIDENT HAVEN instigated
other improvements: in 1864, a
course in mining engineering was
offered; two years later the Uni-
versity installed departments of
mechanical engineering and of
pharmacy; and there were further
gains in library and museum fa-
cilities.
But in spite of the outward
appearance of progress, Haven
wa~s soon inlvolved in two dis-
heartening controversies: the
battle over the introduction of
Homeopathy in the medical de-
partment, and the question of
admitting women to the Univer-
sity.
The first issue appears to have
arisen in the year 1867 when the
State Legislature offered to give
the proceeds from a new property
tax to the University. But there
was a string attached: the school
would get the money only on the
condition that the medical de-
partment initiated a professorship
in Homeopathy.
* * *
HAVEN WAS incensed by the
Legislature's apparent invasion of
the Regents' authority. But the
Regents, more conscious of the
money to be gained through co-
operation with the State, offered
to locate a school of Homeopathy
away from Ann Arbor. This pro-
position was vetoed by the State
Supreme Court, and the Univer-
sity went without the needed tax
revenue in 1867-68.
From a modern vantage

point, the Homeopathy issue
seems to have had no reason-
able basis. Although the propo-
nents of the new theory had
formed rather obnoxious
"cults," their basic notion of
serum technique has since een
proven generally valid.
Fortunately, in 1868, Haven
persuaded the Legislature to ad-
vance the funds without the quali-
fication, and the Homeopathy
question was tabled.
* *
TO ARD THE end of the Six-
ties, another problem was thrown
in the lap of Erastus Haven. In-
creasing public pressure forced a
request from the Legislature that.
the University admit women. Ac-
tually, the by-laws of 1850 con-
tained no specific ban on coeduca-
tion, but the very thought of it
scandalized many on the Univer-
sity faculty. The general opinion
was that gross immorality in the
classroom would be the inevitable
result of such liberality. Physiolo-
gists, for example, refused out-
right to even consider discussion
of their subject in mixed com-
pany.
In 1867, President Haven pre-
sented a popular view on how
to solve the problem-the es-
tablishment of a separate insti-
tution for women. The follow-
ing year, however, he reversed
himself in a recommendation to
the Regents - under pressure,
apparently from the Legisla-
ture.
But coeducation could not be
forestalled for long, and oppon-
ents of the idea were soon putt
down. But events were to prevent
Haven himself from welcoming
the first Michigan coed in the
year 1870. In June, 1869, he sub-
mitted his resignation.
From start to finish, he had
never been at pece in the Presi-
dent's office.
* * *
HAVEN, WHO appeared later as
the president of Northwestern
University, had been an adequate
administrator, certainly, and his
term in office was marked by sev-
eral notable improvements in the
University plan t.
Meantime, a somewhat fran-
tic Board of Regents, after fail-
ing temporarily in its efforts to
bring to Mihigan James Hur-
rill Angell - a noted Eastern
educator-appointed as I'resi-
dent Pro Tempore, Henry Sim-
mons Frieze, a professor of La-
tin in Ann Arbor since 1854.
White-haired Professor Friezm
was a patient, sincere man whose
great love of music foreshadowed
future developments in that field
at the University, and was reflect-
ed later with the installation of
the Frieze Memorial Organ at Hill
Auditorium. But because of his
temporary status as President, he
hesitated in instituting changes of
a far-reaching nature - prefer-
ring, inst ead, to deal wit.h prob-
lems as they arose. In this intent
lie succeeded admirably.
* * '
IN 1870, MISS Madelon Stock-
well-an honor student at a ves-
tigial remnant of the University's
extension school in Kalamazoo --
decided she wanted to come to the
University. Acting President Frieze
promoted her cause, and in Jan-
uary, 1870, a State Legislature
resolution called for the admission
of any person possessing "the re-
quisite literary and moral quali-
fications." Miss Stockwell immed-
iately suffered through the en-
trance examinations, and became
Michigan's first official woman
student.
Surviving reports have it that

she succeeded admirably, des-
pite being completely cold-
shouldered and subject to cer-
tain untoward banter from a
fuddy - duddy faculty and a
pompous male student body.
Acting President Frieze noted
Miss Stockwell's excellent record
while she was at Kalamazoo Col-
lege, and began to question gen-
erally the whole system of Uni-
versity entrance examinations.
Under his initiative, students were
finally admitted directly from ac-
credited high schools.
ON THE DARK side of the
Frieze record, it appears that the
student body was running wild--
engaging, for example, in violent
class rushes and freshman-sopho-
more battles. Acting-President
Frieze, somewhat piqued by the
inadequacy of his status, told
critics that the condition would
be remedied only by a permanent
chief executive.
James Burrill Angell arrived in
June, 1871.
* * *
President Angel's Days
When James Burrill Angell
came to Michigan in 1871, the
future of the University seemed
no more certain than the flip of a
coin.
Statewide concern was rising
over a number of ominous factors
-Legislative indifference to the
University, the still-remembered
dismissal of President Tappan,
Haven's disconcerting resignation,
and the issue of homeopathic
medical instruction at Michigan.
Nor was the situation improved
by a flurry of unfriendly news-
paper comment, or current talk of
Ann Arbor's undisciplined student
body.
* * *
YET, DR. ANGELL regarded
the problems as surmountable
and the lull in the Michigan story
as only temporary. The campus
had safely weathered the tense
Civil War years, although many
of her sons had failed to return,
and the new president saw a bril-
liant future for a determined Uni-
versity.
And so, undaunted by the
widespread atmosphere of pes-
simixn, President Angell learn-
ed of the University - serving
first as registrar, and later as
dean of the literary department.
His hope was symbolized, soon
after his inauguration, when he
laid the cornerstone of University
Hall---a building destined to be
for many years thecenter of cam-
pus life with its chapel, much-
needed classroom space, and 3,000
seat auditorium.
* * *
ANGELL THEN set about a vig-
orous development of curricula,
the extent and importance of
which can only be hinted at here.
The engineering department
immediately suggested itself as
an object for improvement, and
Angell instituted many of the
specialized technical programs
followed today.
Seminars were introduced in
the literary department in 1871,
and rigid curriculum requirements
were slackened in 1878. Students
were afterward permitted to put
their emphasis on English, his-
tory, and modern language rather
than on the previously required
program of the classics, mathe-
matics, and science. There was
an increase in the number of elec-
tive subjects that might be car-
ried.
* * *
IN 1879, THE University added
See MICHIGAN, Page 5

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