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August 05, 1949 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-08-05

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MDA'Y, AUGUST 5, 1949

"TTIATE MIC.41GAN DA1T.

E 1 U Da . , i ~ l 1 1 1 1 1 \ "'Y',1 A T J O S T , 1 4 w p MTllN 1!T T

P~AGE

Tigers

Take Series lincher; Dodgers,

Cards Wit

Bums Blast Pirates, 11-3;
Cards Scalp Braves, 10-2

n

c

ST. LOUIS-(/P)-The St. Louis
Cardinals retained their half-game

grip on the National League lead
yesterday by battering the Boston
Braves 10-2, while Al Brazle and
Ted Wilks held the Braves to six
hits.
The Redbirds slammed out 17
safe blows against Johnny Sain,
Glenn Elliott and Bob Hall. Sain
was knocked out of the box in the
fifth inning.
It was Brazle's 12th victory, giv-
ing the Cardinals three out of the
four-game series.
Ron Northey, Redbird right
fielder, cracked out a home run in
the third inning - his third of the
year - and Jeff Heath got one
for Boston in the ninth - his first
of the season.
Stan Musial and Red Schoen-
dienst both collected three hits
out of five times at bat to lead the
Cardinals.
Dodgers 11, Pirates 3
PITTSBURGH - (R) - The
Brooklyn Dodgers whipped the
Pittsburgh Pirates, 11-3, yesterday
to sweep the four game series. Gil
Hodges, Duke Snider and Tommy
Brown contributed home runs in
the 14-hit attack which marked
the Dodgers' fifth consecutive vic-
tory.
Big Don Newcombe went the
distance although tagged for 11
hits and registered his 10th vic-
tory. He has lost three. The Pi-
rates got nine of their hits in the
first five innings, but could man-
age only two runs.
Hodges' homer, his 17th, sent
the Dodgers off to a 2-0 lead in
the second inning. The Brooks
picked up three more in the fourth
when Snider cracked his 17th four
bagger with two mates aboard.
Brown's homer came in the fifth
with one on.
Newcombe held the Bucs score-
less until the eighth when Danny
Murtaugh doubled and counted
on a single by Stan Rojek.
Reds Take Two
CINCINNATI - 0P) - The Cin-
cinnati Reds knocked off the fad-
ing Philadelphia Phillies in both
ends of a doubleheader yesterday
8-5 and 9-1, to sweep a four-game
series.
The Reds clipped three Phila-
delphia pitchers for 11 hits in
DO YOU KNOW . . . that
Bob Harrison and Boyd McCas-
lin, two outstanding cagers for
Michigan who graduated last
June, teamed up with eight other
midwestern players late in
March and beat the fabulous
Harlem Globe Trotters, 51-50.

dl+

Shirley May
Makes Test
Tomorrow
DOVER, Eng. -( P)-- Shirley
May France will get her first test
in the open waters of the English
Channel tomorrow.
Her coach, Harry Boudakian,
said today he plans to have the
16-year-old Somerset, Mass., girl
take a five-mile practice swim
outside Dover Harbor that day.
Thus far, the husky Americany
swimmer has done all her train-'
ing for the channel swim inside
the harbor because of poor weath-
er conditions.
Capt. John Burwill, veteran
channel pilot, says, however, the
weather is improving. He thinks
conditions will be right for a try
within the next three days. Bou-
dakan has said Shirley May will
not attempt the crossing until
some time next week at the earli-
est.
She took her longest workout to-
day. For two hours she flailed
through the harbor waters and
came out fresh as a daisy after
covering about four miles, most of
it against a two-and-a-half knot
tide.
As usual, Shirley May gave the
folks on shore a good show. She
sprinted the last 50 yards then
ran briskly out of the water.

DURABLE LUKE:
Appling One Game Short
Of AL Shortstop Record

PHILADELPHIA - (A) - Lean
Luke Appling - "Old Moanin'
Low"-- will have to wait at least
another day before reaching the
goal he wants more than any
other, the Major League record
for durable shortstops.
The Chicago White Sox short-
stop had hoped to tie tonight the
mark of 2,153 games set by Rab-
bit Maranville with five national
league clubs between 1912 and
.1931.
BUT A HEAVY rain today and
threat of still more moisture for-
ced postponement of the game
against the Philadelphia Athlet-
ics.
Appling, who has played 2,-,
152 games in spending almost
half of his 40 years with the
White Sox since 1930, will get
another chance to match Mar-
anville's record tomorrow night
in Washington.
"It's the record I've wanted more
than anything else," Appling ad-
mitted, "because I love to play
baseball.
"HOW MUCH longer will I keep
on playing?
"Just as long as the club and
the fans are willing to put up
with me."

STAN MUSIAL
... leads Cardinal attack
winning the opener and Johnny
Vander Meer, veteran Redleg
southpaw, threw a five-hitter in
the nightcap.
Putting together their biggest
win streak of the season, the sev-
enth-place Reds got off to an
early start in the first game,
knocking Russ Meyer from the
mound with four-run blast in the
opening heat. ,Danny Litwhiler
highlighted the uprising with a
two-run homer, his second circuit
blow in as many days.
Cubs 1, Giants 0
CHICAGO -(A')- Johnny Sch-
mitz pitched a three hitter yes-
terday as the Chicago Cubs end-
ed an eight-game losing streak,
with a 1-0 shutout victory over
the New York Giants.
A home' run by Andy Pafko in
the second inning proved to be
the decisive blow. It came off
Larry Jansen, the loser, and end-
ed a six-game winning streak by
the Giants. Jansen allowed but
four hits as his season record
levelled off at 11-11.
Schmitz had a no-hitter going
into the eighth inning. Sid Gor-
don, first up for the Giants, hit
a slow roller towards third and
beat it out for a single on a very
close play that brought a squawk
from the Cub bench.
DO YOU KNOW . . . that
Mack Suprunowicz, this year's
basketball captain, has already
scored a total of 486 points in
three years of Conference play
and now holds total scoring hon-
ors for Michigan with a season
left to, play.

Which could be a pretty long
time. At an age when most men'
are looking for rocking chairs,
Luke is thriving on a seven-day
baseball diet. His .305 batting av-
erage is the best of the club's reg-
ulars and he continues to field,
throw and run at a pace that be-
lies his years.
HE'S AS MUCH a fixture with
the White Sox as the flagpole at,
their home Comiskey Park. Says
club president Charles Comiskey:
"; don't remember any other
White Sox shortstop except Ap-
pling." . .
Aside from durability and his
demonstrated ability as a player
Luke has one other trademark.
He almost never fails to report
some ache or ailment when asked
about his health. Clubhouse stor-
ies about his aching muscles and
creaky joints are part of the leg-
end of baseball. That's how he
earned the nickname, "The Moan-
er."
* * *
"I ALWAYS FEEL fine until I
start working," Luke says. "Then
I begin to hurt. Guess I broke
into baseball with aches and pains,
for the first time I tried to catch
a ball it hit me plumb on the
nose.,,
Despite that boyhood accident,
Luke became a baseball player,
went from Oglethorpe Univer-
sity to the Atlanta Crackers in
1930 and before the season end-
ed moved on to the White Sox.
He's been there ever since.
He has led the American Lea-
gue in batting twice, in 1936 and
1943, owns a lifetime average of
.312 and a fielding mark of .946.
Onslow is the sixth manager for
whom he's played. And Luke was
the favorite of every one, an easy-
going, dependable guy always try-
ing his best.

500 Golfers
Start'Tam'
Play Today
CHICAGO-(A')-The All-Amer-
ican Championships, first install-
ment of George S. May's $66,200
golf carnival, today sends some
500 professionals and amateurs
into a complex 10-day outing at
Tam O'Shanter course.
Half of the field in the All-
American's concurrent pro-ama-
teur-women's open circus will play
18 holes today.
* * *
THE OTHER half shoves off to-
morrow. May proudly points out
that no qualifying is necessary.
But in effect there is quite a bit,
because Sunday's second round of
the 72-hole medal play test will
find a field of only 200.
This is accomplished by the
May code of eligibility which
whittles the second rounders to
125 pros, 40 amateurs and 30
women.
The $20,000 All-American which
leading money winner Sammy
Snead never has captured is only
a prelude to May's "World Cham-
pionship of Golf."
* * *
THE "WORLD" event, another
72-hole medal chase, starts next
Thursday. (Wednesday is held
open in event of an All-American
playoff of which there have been
three in the eight previous meets.)
In order to maintain player
(especially) and spectator inter-
est in his fairways marathon, May
has a $10,000-$7,000-$5,000 lure
for win-place-and-show in the
$35,200 "world" affair.
Needless to say, the potential of
$13,333 for winning both events
has Tam swarming with every pro
who had the $20 entry fee and'
carfare to Chicago.

NEW YORK-(A)-A pair of
jinxes worked overtime yesterday
as the Detroit Tigers outlasted the
New York Yankees, 3-2, in an
11-inning struggle.
Pat Mullin, who thrives on
Yankee pitching, punched out the
winning hit, a single to right that
brought in Eddie Lake from third
with the winning run after two
were out in the top of the 11th.
It was the fourth hit for the
Tiger centerfielder. Mullin's first
hit, a single tp center, scored

are the only team he has not
beaten this season.
The defeat cut the Yankees
margin to five games over the
third place Boston Red Sox. The
runner-up Cleveland Indians were
to take on the Washington Sen-
ators in a twilight-night double-
header.
Tribe Takes Two
WASHINGTON-QP)-Cleveland
shaved the lead of the New York
Yankees to 2 2 games last night
by sweeping a twilight - night
double-header from the hapless
Washington Senators before a
crowd of 24,299. The Indians trav-
eled 12 innings to capture the
opener, 6-3, then coasted to a
14-1 victory behind Bob Feller's.
6-hit pitching.
* * *
Bosox 12, Browns 2
BOSTON-() -Boston's Red.
Sox supported the six hit pitching
of right hander Joe Dobson with
a 14 hit attack for a 12-2 victory
yesterday over the American Lea-
gue's last place St. Louis Browns.
Since Detroit beat New York 3-
2, the distance between the league-
leading Yankees and the third-
place Sox was reduced to five
games.
The decision gave the Sox a
sweep of the three-game series
with the Browns and was their
fifth consecutive triumph.
The Sox made victory certain
with four runs in the opening inn-
ing when St. Louis starter Red
Embree retired after giving up
three bases on balls and two hits.
He was replaced by left hander
Bill Kennedy.
All the Sox except Ted Williams
and Dobson hit safely.
Williams walked three times and
now has drawn 106 passes this
season.
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Bought,
Repaired,
Rented
STATIONERY &'SUPPLIES
G. t. Requisitions Accepted
0.D. MOR
314 South State St.

Bengals Edge Yankees, 3-2;
IndiansSweepDouble Bill

Major League StandingsI

BOB FELLER
... struck out nine

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

New York ...
Cleveland
Boston .....
Philadelphia.
Detroit ......
Chicago
Washington
St. Louis ....

W
61
59
57
55
56
41
.....36
.34,

L
37
40
43
46
47
59
61
66

Pct.
.622
.596
.570
.545
.544
.410
.369
.340

GB
212
5
7%2
71/2
21
21%/
28

W.
St. Louis ........61
Brooklyn ........60
New York ........52
Boston ..........52
Philadelphia . .. .50
Pittsburgh ......45
Cincinnati .......42
Chicago .........37

L.
38
38
47
49
51
53
58
65

Pet.
.616
.612
.525
.515
.495
.459
.420
.363

G.B.
12
9
10
12
15 12
19%
2512

Vb
QV

pitcher Fred Hutchinson in the
third with the Tigers' first run.
Hutchinson, although relieved by
Virgil Trucks in the 11th, was
credited with the victory, his ninth
of the year and fifth in succes-
sion.
Vic Raschi went the route for
the Yankees and was tagged with
his sixth defeat. He has won 15.
Half of his defeats have come at
the hands of the Tigers. They
Hair Styles for
Michigan Coeds
We will individually cut-style
your hair to your needs and
personality. Our staff includes
six hair cutters with years of
your hair to your needs and
experience. We invite your ap-
proval.
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

FOR
SALE

U

m 66 "No,
r
.r.
'WAR

Matinee 25c Nights 35c
TODAY & SATURDAY
Continuous from 1:30 P.M.

2 x 3 RB SERIES B GRAFLEX cam-
era with sunshade and cloud filter.
$85. 1126 Martin Place. )155
TWO SMALL scatter oriental rugs, very
beautiful and very reasonable. Phone
2-5152. )157
PIANO-Woodward upright, $50, good
condition. Ph. 2-6634. )134
1937 PLYMOUTH-Mechanically good,
new front end, good tires. $165 or
best offer. Call 2-9468. )137
'37 STUDEBAKER 4-door $125. Motor,
brakes, steering recently overhauled.
Call 3YP 4701R. )140
120 BASS ACCORDIAN-Man's profes-
sional model, will sell reasonable. ph.
2-7051. )141
FOUR-DOOR SEDAN in excellent con-
dition, LaSalle '37. New tires, radia-
tor, carburetor, battery, rings. $270.
Phone Leslie Kish, 2-6270. ) 142
HARLEY '45" MOTORCYCLE-Excellent
condition, only 6000 miles. Call 305
Tyler, East Quadrangle. )144
MEN'S ROLLFAST BICYCLE in good
condition. See at 119 N. Forest Ave. or
call 2-8612 after 5 p.m. )132
'42 PACKARD CLUB COUPE-Clipper 8,
good condition, must sell. No reason-
able offer rejected. Ph. 2-2432. )131
JEEP-4-wheel drive with special body,
1948. 15,000 miles, original owner.
$675. Call 25-9383. )130
WHY WALK when you can ride? Man's
bike, A-1 condition. Don Lauer, 3-1511,
ext. 2492. )97
SUMMER SPECIALS: Rayon Slacks,
$5.00; Seersucker pants $2.99; U.S.
Navy T-Shirts $.49; Loafers, leather
soles $4.99; Cable knit T-Shirts $1.95;
Men's sport shorts $1.49. Open til 6:30.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )149
PARRAKEETS make delightful, inex-
pensive pets. Easily trained to talk
and whistle. Also canaries, bird sup-
plies and cages. Mrs. Ruffins, 562 So.
Seventh. )88a

FOR SALE
REDUCED PRICES-Men' '-afers $3.88;
U.S. Navy T-shirts 49c; wish slacks
$2.66; sport shirts, short-sleeves $1.69;
men's sport shorts $1.49; all wool
swim trunks $1.49. Open 'til 6:30.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )113
,1 HELP WANTED
WORK after Summer School in your
home town selling newly patented
product needed in every home. You
make $1 on each $2.25 sale. No in-
vestment needed. Stop by any eve-
ning this week to see it and for fur-
ther information. Bob Krieger, 321
So. Division, Apt. 2. )143
TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING MONTANA Aug. 13. Riders all
or part way. Dick Byers, 2-4591. )156
WANTED-Riders to Mass. after exams.
Phone Ypsi. 4327M11 after 6. )159
GOING TO BOSTON Sept. 15--Rider
wanted. Apt. 8, 220 S. Thayer. )133
COUPLE DESIRES RIDE to or near
Kansas City, Mo., on or after Aug. 13.
Share driving and expenses. Joe H.
Crawford, 1284 Danvers, Willow Vil-
lage, phone Ypsi. 5445W3 after 12:30.
)136
TWO STUDENTS DESIRE RIDE to New
York-Philadelphia area about August
11. Share expenses. Vallorani, Ph.
2-9431. )139
WANTED-Ride for couple to St. Louis
or Kansas City after 12 noon Friday,
Aug. 12th.tShare driving and expenses
or flat rate. Phone 2-8624 after 5
p.m. )145
TRANSPORTATION: Passengers want-
ed to New England August 13. Share
gasoline cost. Box 199, Mich. Daily.
)148
WANTED: Ride from campus to Willow
Village Mon. thru Fri. at 4:30 p.m.
See Mrs. Angle, 1213 Springfield after
6. )154

ROOMS
FOR RENT
RENT LOW to male student who would
be away from Friday afternoon to
Monday morning. Pleasant front room,
two large closets. Private family. Box
198, Mich. Daily. )158

i"

LOST
and
FOUND

WANTED
ROOM AND BOARD. $14.00 per week.
3 meals, Monday thru Saturday. Din-
ner Sunday (1 p.m.) Sanitary ap-
proved A.A. Health Dept. Phone Mrs.
Peachers, 2-3782. 1009 E. Catherine.
)150
WORK-Full time, any kind. Contact
Cal Leedy at 8257. )92
FOR RENT
i
ROOM to share for Graduate women.
Fall semester. Approved house. 2-7328.
)151
PERSONALS
YOUR LAST CHANCE to take advan-
tage of the special student rates on
TIME, LIFE and FORTUNE. Phone
6007 now. Student Periodical Agency.
)146
WANTED TO RENT

No Fuss - No Bother - No Worry
NO PARKING TROUBLES

:,

GARNET RING in gold setting. Lost
July 28. Ph 25-9470, Reward. )138
BUSINESS
SERVICES
LEARN TO DANCE
JIMMIE HUNT DANCE STUDIOS
209 S. State St. Ph. 8161 )5B
GROUP PICTURES taken. Candid
wedding pictures a specialty. C.3W.
Nichols, 711 '. Division. Ph. 5333.

F

BEER
DEPOT

N .

I

DRIVE THROUGH!

TYPEWRITING SERVICE
Student reports, theses, dissertations.
Phone 6197. )28
WE BIND THESES, term papers and
dissertations in a variety of styles and
colors.
OLSEN'S BINDERY
325 E. Hoover Phone 2-7976 )1
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )2

WANTED - TO RENT
Two-Bedroom House
Two Children, ages 5 and 7.
University Employee
Phone 5539
Ending Saturday

Plus!

JON HALL "THE MUTINEERS"
ART CINEMA LEAGUE
Presents
PROFESSO R
MAMLOCK
Based on the play by Friederich Wolf
Starring - MEZHINSKY
"A wonderful drama of a scientist's attempt to divorce
himself from the world in which he lives."-IMB
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

:;i: '

wommawd

JOHNNY THRIVES
ON DANGER
... Especially when
it wears
perfume!

i

COOL!

Continuous
From 1 P.M.

;002

TODAY and
Saturday!

I9
SPECIAL t
SELLING ". r:f
Cool Rayon
SLACKS
$5.00
(Values to 7.9)us
Glen Plaids - Blues
Browns - Greys
FREE ALTERATIONS
fmmediate Service
MEN'S
PLAY SHORTS
Boxer Style
$1.49
Cool Comfort-Sizes 30-46 Army Type
LOCKERS
S999

I

I

Only at Lyon and Healy can
you find such a wealth of ma-
terial on every phase of Sheet
Music and Music Literature .. .
books and folios for beginner.
advanced student and artist
from catalogues to all leadina

I

14 rm l - E 4"mwl o Ins II

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i t......._. ,. t ..-..... _ ........

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