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August 03, 1949 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-08-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1949

T MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MCTTTGN MT

U

s.

Tops Fashion Capital in Student Opinion

Latin Students Form English
Study Group for Summer,

By PAT BROWNSON
Finding a pharmacist, a chem-
ist, an architect and an engineer
sprawled out in a puddle of water
on the floor flapping their arms
like birds is a rather disconcerting
experience to anyone-believe me!
But those are exactly the cir-
cumstances in which this reporter
met four such professional women.
They were coeds from widely scat-
tered parts of South America
studying at the English Language
Institute here.
Their strange , antics on the
floor were quickly accounted for
by the fact that they were par-
ticipating in a swimming class,
part of their physical education
program.
AFTER PRACTICING on land
the swimming strokes taught them
by their instructor, Miss Jane
White, the quartet dove into the
Barbour "bathtub" and displayed
their aquatic prowess, while Miss
White called out instructions to
them. They followed most sugges-
tions correctly which was little
short of amazing considering that
when they came here at the be-
ginning of the summer sessior
they knew very few English words,
When the class was over this
reporter cornered the four sen-
oritas to inquire about their
stay here and found that they
are part of a group of non-Eng-
lish speaking students from
South, and Central America,
Mexico and Canada, who are
studying the English language
from 8 a.m. to noon every day
Monday through Friday. The
whole group, composed of 100
men and women, lives in Victor*
Vaughan House.
Each of the coeds heartily
agreed that they think Ann Arbor
is a very beautiful city. Also on
their list of likes are American
sports and dances, especially
square dancing, which they don't
have at home. All were in agree-
ment about one big dislike, how-
ever-American coffee. They said
that it is weaker than South-of-
the-border coffee and it isn't pure
coffee.
* * *
MOST OF THE foreign stu-

dents in the group are college
graduates, but there are some un-
dergraduates and some high
school graduates included. There
are approximately 70 men and 30
women, which includes four'or five
married couples and even a pair
of honeymooners.
A number of the students are
here on scholarships, while oth-
ers are being financed by their
families. The course offered by
the Institute is very intensive,
providing one teacher for every
ten pupils.
The teachers live right with the
students and are on hand at all
times to give assistance. In the
house a fine of a penny must be
paid for each Spanish word spok-
en. The coeds laughingly nodded
assent to the remark of one mem-
ber of the quartet-"We're all
poor by now!"
* * *
OPEN HOUSES are held every
Friday night. Dancing and card
playing are featured at the affairs
which are open to everyone on
campus.
Every evening after supper
short meetings are held at which
songs are sung and different
residents of the house give talks.
The Independence Day of each
South American country is cele-
brated by a program. On July 5
the Independence of Venezuela
was commemorated. For Colom-
bia's Independence Day on July 20
the president of that country sent
some pure coffee for the celebra-
tion.
The English Language Institute
plans special trips for its students
each year. This summer 63 stu-
dents traveled by boat to Niagara
Falls for the weekend.
Prehistoric Gamblers
SUSANVILLE, Cal.-The Wad-
adokado Indians, a prehistoric
tribe, were a slick bunch of crap
shooters with a private back-room
den, according to archaeologists.
Old gambling instruments were
found in a cave in eastern Cali-
fornia.

Former Coed
Plans August
Ceremonies
Miss Joyce Anne Johnson will
become the bride of Jack Ross
Martin in a double ring ceremony
scheduled for August 20 in the
chapel of the Congregational
Church in Benton Harbor.
The bride-elect's parents are Mr.
and Mrs. Henry L. Johnson of
Benton Harbor, while Mr. Martin
is the son of Mrs. W. E. Martin
of Huntington, West Va.
* * *
MISS JOHNSON will wear a
ballerina length white organdy
dress with a ruffled hat of the
same material. Attending the
couple will be Miss Janice John-
son, sister of the bride-to-be, and
Phil Martin.
Formerly women's editor of
The Daily for the years 1947-48,
Miss Johnson graduated from
the University with an AB de-
gree in English Literature. She
was also a member of Senior
Society.
Mr. Martin, who was Sports
Editor of The Daily while in
school, has an AB in Journalism
and an MA in Political Science.
He was also on the track team. He
is now employed on the Sports
Staff of the Detroit Free Press.
The couple will live in Detroit.

Any way you LOOK at it!
You can't beat these values

v

'U' Observers Find Americans
Best-Dressed Women in Paris

EDITOR'S NOTE-This is the fourth
in a series of articles on the National
Student Association summer tour of
Europe by Barnett and Dolores Las-
chaver, Daily Staff members. Mrs.
Laschaver is the former Dolores Pa-
lanker, a Daily night editor.)
PARIS- (Delayed) -"The most
fashionable women in the world
can still be found on Fifth Avenue
in New York City."
Such was the opinion of one of
the "world travelers" in this NSA
Tr-Nation study tour.
Casual observation as one strolls
the streets of Paris reveal that the
best-dressed people are the Amer-
icans. Even in the more expensive
restaurants and nightclubs the
famed Paris fashions are notice-
ably lacking.
* * *.
THE REASON can best be
summed up in the will-known
tourist adage: "Anybody who is
anybody leaves Paris in the sum-
mertime."
The French who can afford to
buy the expensive Parisian fasr-
ions can afford to leave the hot
city for mountain chateaux and
the Riviera.
As for the people still left in
Paris, style is noticeably absent.
Materials are coarse and colors
are dark and serviceable. Women's
skirts are short, much like the
knee length worn during the war.
* * *
ONE OF the most noticeable
features is the apparent lack of
ingenuity in hair styles. Women
wear their hair in massive pompa-

dours, dwarfing their faces with
great wads of frizzy ends.
Only the French bathing suits
have lived up to expeetations.
Women's swim suits consist of
scanty bras and panties while
men's are little more thar loin
cloths. "At least they enable one
to get an almost overall tan," one
American student comr:ented.
CONTRARY to American styles,
Parisian women rarely wear slacks
or shorts whereas the majori y of
Frenchmen in Paris today are ev-
erywhere seen in shorts.
American women students, on
the other hand, have attracted
much attention, with their long
skirts, bright colors and bobbed
hair.
Particularly eye-catching to the
French are bustle-backed dresses
=the French call them "tra-la-
las"-and off-the-shoulder blous-
es. The French middle-class, con-
trary to belief, seems far more
conservative than the American.
This tour's French student
guide, 21-year-old Ann Fabre, be-
lieves the American women are
more beautiful and better-dressed
than the French women.
"But also they are more inhibit-
ed, and, I think, less intelligent,"
she added.
Asa for American men, Ann
thinks they a'e more "beautiful"
too. "But they are not so exciting
as Frenchmen."

1/
1/2,

(LA.

I

SAl

J

I

Fa

ALL DRESSES in cotton, pure silks, rayon prints, shan-

tungs, and linens .

many pastels and darker

crepes. Sizes 9

to 15, 10 to 44,

141/2 to 241/2.

$14.95 to $39.95.
ALL SUMMER SUITS orig. from $16.95 to $39.95.

35 SPRING SUITS . . . mostly

100% gabardines and

crepes. Orig. from $39.95 to $69.95.
ALL SPRING COATS ... orig. from $39.95 to $65.00.

50 SKIRTS ... cottons, rayon tweeds, and wools.
from $5.00 to $10.95.

Orig.

ATLANTIC ATTIRE:
Bright Colors Characterize Coast Fashions

By HERB ROVNER
(Special to The Daily)
BOSTON, Mass.--From Ogon-
quit to Plum Island, summer fa-
shions this year have been char-
acterized by a striking conserva-
tiveness in style accompanied by a
new flamboyance in color.
Women are wearing their
clothes with a new air of elegance
marking their successful adapta-
tion of the "new look" to their
individual tastes and needs.

Groups of JACKETS BLOUSES NIGHT GOWNS
Wools, Stripes, Denims, Cottons, Silk Prints of Satin and Creps
and Chambrays White and Colored Crepes r5
orig. $5.95 to $29.95 orig. $3.95 to $10.95 orig $6.95 to $12.95
COSTUME JEWELRY SLIPS
Rhinestone Pins,FARCGOE
Bracelets,tand Earrings Lace Trimmed and Tailored
orig, $5.00 to $15.00 Shorties and Gauntlets
Scatter Pins and Earrings orig. $.50 to $4.00
orig. $1.00 to $5.00 orig. $3.95 to $10.95

The brief "Bikini" bathing suit
has been replaced by the trim and
traditional one piece along the
Atlantic seaboard, but this trend
is enhanced by the many brilliant
colors hitherto unseen on the
beaches.
* * *
CHARTREUSE, a vivid yellow-
green, has won an unprecedented
popularity and is easily the most
favored color, while coral, a soft
warm shade of red, is also among
the headliners.
Evening wear is exclusively
cotton, with the emphasis on
last year's popular fashion, the
sunback dress, present in many
unusual and attractive combina-

tions, among them navy and
mauve. Favored for informal
dances at the country club and
"cook-outs" are off the shoulder
blouses with companion plaid
skirts.
Tie silk prints and white palm
beach suits are the fashiontalong
the straw hat circuit, both in
styles designed to display a maxi-
mum of tan.
AT FORMALS, organdy and
eyelet share the summer spotlight,
these fabrics being as cool as they
are feminine looking. Women have
also reverted to the more chic high
heeled evening slippers this year,
reserving "flats" for daytime wear.

7Te (/ja6 eth 41.Uivrkit £ 'p
S. State just off N. University

I-

VACf4TION

Sf4LE

An opportunity to fill in your early Fall wardrobe needs

DRE

S

S

ES

$5I
Formerly to $14.95

$10
Formerly to $32.95

$15
Formerly to $49.95

A Select Group of Street and Dinner Dresses
(including Eisenberg Originals)
NOW Y2 PRICE
Originally Priced $59.95 to $99.50

11 SUITS
WOOL-GABARDINE
SIZES 10 to 18
Were $49.95 to $99.50
8 Hollywood
KNIT SUITS
White - Green - Aqua
SIZES 12 to 42
Were $32.95 to $35.00

1C
PRICE

8 SUMMER
SUITS
Long & Short Sleeves
SIZES 12 to 20
Were $21.95 to $25
9 SHORTIE
COATS
SIZES 11 to 18
Were $17.95 to $25
12 Full Length Coats
SIZES 8 to 20
Were $45 to $99.50

-- __ _ _ _ _ _ _a "1pn n N oe ___
by
OF BOSTON
°s/s~sY Mae
xr
The good old, reliable moc, with handsewn
vamp, goes softie ... beguiling little
ankle strap and low cut sides, to say nothing
of a winsome sweetheart vamp.
You'll skim along in it with assurance of
god fit. es action .smart looks

N' a -r
r
, . ..
,"
... ; .
..
1N
. r
: .;i

+z " ; , ! ,ti, ,,,,t
:. ,,
r" .
.r
A'

(lass-conscious or ate-dreaming
you're perfectly fitted
o~efor college
Ielle-"?: harmeer
stockings
You may prefer the samba to Socrates, but
you go right to the head of the class,
-chick, when you wear Belle-Sharmeer Stockings
-made in your very own leg-size. They're sheer
-..sorcery-smooth as skin, and shades prettier!
We'll fit you in your personal leg-size,
Belle-Sharmeers ... in sheer weights
for working or wooing hours.
1l sn to vl99

Read and Use Daily Classified Agds

Blouses and Skirts Regardless Former Price. Now....
TABLE OF ACCESSORIES
Slips - Gowns - Pajamas - Swim Suits - Play Shoes

1'

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