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August 03, 1949 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-08-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY,

_ _ ! I i

Face Lifting
Planned for
White House
Razing Rejected
As Tradition Wins
WASHINGTON-(P-A special
commission decided definitely yes-
terday against tearing down the
White House.
Instead, the executive mansion
will get a $5,400,000 face lifting.
A GROUP OF six men -ettled
the controversy between advocates
of renovation and those who want-
ed to raze the present building
and put up a new one.
Chairman McKellar (D-
Tenn.) of the Senate Appropria-
tions Committee and head of
the commission, announced the
decision after a long conference
at the White house.
Sagging under the burden of a
century and a half, the mansion
became so unsafe that President
Truman asked Congress for mon-
ey with which to do something
about it.
HE CONCEDED at the time
that it might be cheaper to build
a new building than to fix up the
old one. But, he argued, there is
too much tradition and sentiment
attached to it to tear it down.
Chairman Cannon (D-Mo.) of
he House Appropriations Com-
inittee was one of those who
thought there should be a newv
building. The controversy final-
ly got so warm that Congress
ultimately authorized funds, but
left to the commission the de-
cision whether to raze or reno-
vate.
Serving with McKellar are Sen-
ator Martin (R-Pa.), Reps. Ra-
baut (D-Mich.) and Keefe (R-
Wis.) Richard E. Daugherty, Vice
President of the New York Central
RaProad, and Douglas William
Orr, Connecticut architect. Maj.
Gen. Glen Edgerton is executive
director of the commission.
ESTIMATES as to the time the
work will require run as high as
two years.
Meantime, President Truman
will continue to live at the Blair
House on Pennsylvania Avenue,
just across from the old StatehDe-
partment building, the neighbor
building to the White House.
The Mansion will be retained in
gt present form and the present
walls wiill be kept.
Armed Forces
Head Given
New Powers
WASHINGTON-(IP)-House ap-
proval, by 356 to 7, yesterday com-
pleted Congressional action on a
bill giving Secretary of Defense
Johnson new powers as boss of
the armed forces.
The measure went to President
Truman for his signature.
* *
THE BILL WOULD:
1. Tighten Johnson's authority
over policies and operationsuof the
services by making it direct au-
thority. The 1947 unification law

gives him only "general" author-
ity.
2. Set up a civilian business
manager over the services' money
matters. The new comptroller will
be an Assistant Secretary of De-
fense, and will be in charge of
establishing uniform budget and
accounting practices throughout
the military departments.
3. Give the joint chiefs of staff
a permanent chairman. They op-
erate now without a chairman, ex-
cept when one is asked to act tem-
porarily-as General Dwight D.
Eisenhower was recently.
The secretary would have broad
powers under the bill, but would
not be able to transfer combat
functions on the services or assign
officers and men in such a way as
to alter their present combat func-
tions.
' e Official Michigan Rings
0 Michigan mugs and
souvenirsc
0 Medals, Cups and Trophies
i Fraternity Jewelry
0 Watch Repair Service O
Hours 12:30 to 5:30, Mon.-Fri.
wa
L. G. Balfour Co.;
1319 S. University Ph. 9533
->rm' w <u "1->w <-> 1f<->7<->m I

Help!

IT ISN'T THE HEAT-IT'S THE NUDITY. Donald Morris, 17, a
Rural Electrification Administration linesman, uneasily mops his
brow upon being surprised by an audience of early arrivals for the
national nudist convention held in the mountains near Denver,
Colo. The foreman of the linemen says that his men are having
trouble keeping their minds on their work.
W UOM To Broadcast Concert

COLLEGE ROUND-UP:
Colorado Audience
Gets Its Money's Worth
By DON SIGMAN
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO music lovers really got hit over the
head recently.
Thor Johnson, Michigan alumnus and director of the Cincinnati
Symphony, led the University summer symphony orchestra in a pro-
gram that not only opened with the "Lyric Overture" by Cecil Effinger
of the Colorado faculty, but closed with it as well. Johnson wanted to
be sure the audience remembered the piece which had its World
Premier performance.
MEANWHILE, ACTORS, would-be actors and hams are having
their day at college campuses throughout the country.
After hot weather cancelled matinee performances, INDIANA
UNIVERSITY playgoers saw Don Marquis' "The Old Soak" in the
"rustic setting" of the Brown County Playhouse. They liked the
plot which concerns an amiable drunk whose only ambition in life
was to drink, philosophize and thwart prohibitioners.
Not to be outdone by their Michigan brethren who flocked to see
"The Wizard of Oz." University of Texas escapists are forgetting their
books and running to the movies to see "Bambi" and "Fantasia."
* * * *
THE MEN of a fraternity at INDIANA UNIVERSITY will find a
parking meter in front of their house when they return this fall. Now
they'll have to feed a "nickel-nurser" to park a car in front of their
own house. It's enough to make you sell your car for scrap, they said.
The Summer Texan at the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS reported
with pride that the UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY admitted 29
Negro students who were "absorbed" very well with little or no
opposition from white students. Five days later they reported two
crosses were burned on the Kentucky campus. Lexington, Ky.,
police shrugged off the incident as a "college prank."
The Texas paper, agreeing with the Louisville Courier-Journal
pointed out the curious timing of the admission of the students and
pointed out the curious timing of the admission of the students and
the "prank." If it was a prank, they said, college campus humor has
reached a low point.
The Summer Texan also reported that the owner of a local dough-
nut shop is looking for the joker who ordered "enough doughnuts for
800 people" over the telephone and then didn't pick them up. The
eatery made up an extra 80 dozen which they eventually had to give
away. (Not enough coffee around to dunk them in.)
LITHOGHAPHING
QUICK SERVICE ECONOMICAL
COLORS and DESIGN
MIMEOGRAPHING
You type stencils or we will.
EDWARDS LETTER SHOP

I V G OASLL t1V TS
--A Bavarian prepares to fire his
pistol to expel ghosts on Corpus
Christi at Obersalzburg.

R E D, O F F E R I N C - Igor Neudachin, of Moscow, holds
strawberries for Sofi Norrgren, of Stockholm, as. with students
from all of Europe, they work in jam factory at Wisbech, England.

'4

i

PICITURE NEWS

WUOM 91.7 will feature another
recorded concert from Interlochen
at 8 p.m. today.
PROGRAM SCHEDULE
P.M.
2:30-Tell Me Professor
2:45-School of Music
2:55-Daily Bulletin
3:00-Campus Varieties
3:30-University Symphony

4:00-Campus News
4:15-The Beaver's Tale
4:30-Requestfully Yours
5:00-Books by Radio
5:15-Adventures in Research
5:30-Children's Story
5:45-Guest Star
6:00-Dinner Music
7:00-Classical Concert
S:00--Interlochen Conceit

COURSES IN
The Early-way method can solve your writing problems.
Service Dept. for All Kinds of Writing -
Greeting Cards, Name Cards, Bookplates

PLUM ES-Charles Von
Wrangel, Princeton 150-pound
crew coach, frayed his hat against
the sun at Henley, England.

I

L I G H T S T U D Y - Sunlight slants between the 50-foot
white marble columns at the monument of Victor Emmanuel IL,
in Venezia Square, Rome, burial place of Italy's Unknown Soldier.

CLASSES
8 A.M. - 8 P.M. (Monday thru Friday)
8 A.M. - 12 Noon (Saturday)

P~enmanhhl rz tu~ik

711 North University

Phone 2-2846

4021/2 Observatory

Phone 2-8606

I

University of Michigan Oratorical Association

1949
1950

LECTURE

COURSE

Hill
Auditorium

presents a program of
IIGISE DCELEBRITIES

MARY

GARDE a.N. .. . a.......O.October 5
Until her retirement in 1934, she was one of the most famous and colorful stars of
the operatic world. In 1907 she made her New York debut in Thais, and from 1910
to 1931 she appeared as prima donna with the Chicago Grand Opera Company.
Subject: MY MEMORIES OF THE OPERA

PONCE PRODUCTS
-Miseli Roman takes her choice
of shoes, all made in the first
shoe factory in her own town of
Ponce, Puerto Rico,swhich pro-)
duces 1,000 pairs

PUPIL TELLS TEACHER--Frank Capra,"Jmovie
director, tells his former school teacher, Miss Jean McDaniel, 87,
about screen plays during her visit to his Hollywood studio.

LELANDSTOWE. . . . .. . . . . . . October 26
A dynamic and analytical speaker, he has long been a favorite with Ann Arbor audiences.
A Pulitzer Prize Winner in Journalism, and the foreign editor for The Reporter, he
is now in Europe making an intensive study of world conditions.
Subject: WE STILL HAVE TIME TO WIN PEACE.

t
a

ADOLPHMENJOU . November 7
During his thirty years in-Hollywood, he has been one of filmdom's leading stars and
one of its most delightful personalities. He is also one of its best expositors, for he has
an intimate knowledge of the motion picture industry.
Subject: STAIRWAY TO STARDOM.
DR.RALPH J. BUNCHE . . . . .

. November 28

No American of our day has had a more important and history-making responsibility.
As Chief of the Trusteeship Division of the United Nations, he brought peace to
Palestine. He is a recognized authority on non-self-governing territories.
Subject: UNITED NATIONS INTERVENTION IN PALESTINE.

kA MO -mA LuNAgE ILI 1 f 0 "INl I - I

lMK5. FI

A1 L I I . KV.KY V L I (DATE TO BE ANNOUNCED)
Ann Arbor will aain welcome this great American. Often called "the first lady of
the world," she has performed notable service as U. S. delegate to the United Nations
and as Chairman of the Committee on 1Human Rights for UNESCO.
Subject: THE CITIZENS RESPONSIBILITY TO THE UNITED NATIONS.

L I G H T E D , VENTILATED N U R S E R Y- A mamma hummingbird finds light, ven-
tilation and warmth for her nest on the tube of a neon sign outside a Bishop, Calif., cocktail bar.

JOHN MASON BROWN . . . . . . . . January 19
Associate Editor of The Saturday Review of Literature, he is returning by popular
request for the fourth successive season to present his kaleidoscopic, stimulating, and
witty commentary on current literature and the Broadway theatre.
Subject: BROADWAY IN REVIEW.

4

KING PETER IIOF YUGOSLAVIA . . . February 15
Following the assassination of his father, King Alexander, he ruled Yugoslavia as a
'teen age sovereign until Hitler and later the Communists brought chaos to his country.
He tells an u nccisored story with si moathetic understanding.
Subject: THE STORY OF MY COUNTRY.

ra rr .

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