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July 20, 1949 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-07-20

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W THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, J

Fellowships
Offered for
Atomie Study
Five pre - doctoral fellowships
for the study of the applications
and implications of atomic energy
will be available at the University
for the 1949-50 year.
The fellowships are part of the
Michigan Memorial-Phoenix Proj-
ect, which is attempting to estab-
lish an atomic research center
dedicated to the peaceful aspects
of atomic energy.
* * *
A STIPEND of $1,500 goes with
each fellowship.
Applications will be received
through August 15, according
to Dean Ralph A. Sawyer of the
graduate school.
"Students well advanced on doc-
toral programs will be preferred,"
Dean Sawyer said. "Applications
are invited from qualified gradA -
ate students who wish to carry on
research in any field dealing with
applications or implications of nu-
clear fissions for which, facilities
are available at the University,"
he said.
* * *
APPROPRIATE research, accor-
ding to the dean, should be in one
of the following fields:
1. The use of radioactive iso-
topes in biological, physical and
engineering sciences.
2. The physical, mathematical
or chemical aspects of nuclear
theory.
3. The social, philosophical, le-
gal or economics aspects of nuclear
energy.
4. Education needs in this field.
Brown Gives
Lecture Today
"Americans in Canada" will be
the topic of the fourth lecture in
the University's series on Ameri-
can-Canadian relations, to be given
at 7:30 p.m. today in Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Gerald S. Brown, a history de-
partment instructor, will be the
speaker.
Formerly associated with Can-
ada's Department of Secretary of
State, Brown will review the part
that Americans have played in the
development of Canada.
Brown is a native of Nova
Scotia.

LATEST DEADLINE IN THE STATE:.
Typical Night Editor R eveals Trials of The Daily

ASSOCIATED PRESS
PU TU'RE NEWS

By LILIAS WAGNER
Daily Special Writer
There's only one person on cam-
pus who doesn't read his Daily
over that morning cup of coffee-
ze's the night editor who put out
the paper.
In fact, he hardly has the
strength to lift the coffee cup af-
ter working almost steadily from
2 p.m. the previous day to 2 a.m.,
hacking out the paper which hits
the streets five mornings a week.
* * *
ONE SUCH harrassed soul is
Paul Brentlinger, a senior in the
Letters and Bus. Ad., combined
curriculum, who took over his
night editing job last May.
His story of how a night edi-
tor works is typical of nearly all
night editors, of which there are
six during the winter and four
during the summer term.
"A night editor has one of the
larger beats," Brentlinger related.
"HE WRITES editorials and puts
out the paper once a week, which
involves making up the pages;
reading and editing stories for er-
rors; assigning and approving
headlines; coordinating activities
on pictures, woman's page and
sports page; cracking the whip
over reporters; answering the tel-
ephone; and keeping the staff
happy-if possible."
In the summer, the night edi-
tor rarely assigns headlines, how-
ever. He has to write them him-
self. He also makes up all of the
pages, and may write movie re-
views, as Brentlinger does, in
addition to editorials.
He get reverberations on his pa-
per the following day on the "criti-

The city editor is official con
mentator during the winter, a
job taken over by the managing
editors in the summer.
While he may be humorous at
times, he can also make life very
uncomfortable for erring night
editors.
* * *
BRENTLINGER remembers viv-
idly one incident which caused
him some discomfort a few weeks
ago. It involved a photograph of
a local minister which was to be
run with a story.
The 9:30 picture deadline roll-
ed around, but there was no pic-
ture of the minister. In desper-
ation, lacking anything else to
fill the gap, Brentlinger latched
onto the first picture he could
find.
Unfortunately, the anonymous
gentleman pictured turned out to
be a Communist labor leader from
Milwaukee. The actual photograph
of the minister came through later
and was printed.
* * *
DURING the summer, there is
generally a scarcity of news. It's
the other way around in the win-
ter months as a rule, when there's
a question of which stories to :11-
clude. Not so with one of Brent-
linger's papers.
"It was the first paper I put out,
eight pages to fill and no stories to
speak of. So I started out right
away with plenty of headaches."
Brentlinger said.
* * *
The pace followed by Daily night
editors-working late once a week,
writing stories in between-and of
course, there's always studying-
may explain why they always have
that hunted look.

I

ONCE ARAB NOW ISRAELI-Once Arab head-1
quarters in Lydda, Israel, this is now the home of a Jewish family.

'P P P Y. C I R L' -- Mile.
Annie Robineau (above), daugh-
ter of a French veteran, will be
flown from Paris with Flanders
poppies for the American Le-
gion's poppy campaign.

NIGHT EDITOR: PAUL BRENTLINGER
-Daily-Ray Okonski
* * * *
cism" sheet tacked up by the man- he rarely escapes without some
aging editor. form of "Hail Columbia" regard-
* * * ing news judgment, headlines, and
AFTER WORKING his head off, a variety of other technicalities.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

All notices' for the Daily Official
Bulletin are to be sent to the Office
of the Summer session in typewritten
form by 3:30 p.m. of the day preced-
ing its publication, except on Satur-
day when the notices should be sub-
mitted by 11:30 a.m., Room 3510 Ad-
ministration Building.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 1949
VOL. LIX, No. 21S
Notices
Approved Student Sponsored So-
cial Events:
July 20-German House.
July 21-Casa. Espanola.

July 22-Couzens Hall.
July 23-German House; Hostel
Club; Lester Cooperative; Mich-
igan Christian Fellowship.
There will be a public showing
of selected Canadian films pro-
vided through the courtesy of the
Canadian Consulate and the Na-
tional Film Board of Canada at
one o'clock, Wednesday and
Thursday, July 20 and 21, in the
University High School Auditori-
um. This program of films is un-
der the auspices of the Canada-
United States Workshop.
There will be no Fresh Air Camp
Clinic this week.
The Graduate Aptitude Makeup
Examination will be held on Wed-
nesday, July 20th at 6:45 p.m. in
the Rackham Lecture Hall.
The Graduate Aptitude Exami-
nation is required of all graduate
students who have not had the
Graduate Record Examination or
the Graduate Aptitude Examina-
tion before.
The fee for the examination is

$2.00. Each student must buy an
examination ticket at the Cash-
ier's Office before the examina-
tion. Veterans will have a Supply
Requisition signed in the Gradu-
ate School office before going to
the Cashier's Office.
Lectures
Lecture Series in Chemistry
Bldg.: Wed., July 20-Prof. Leigh
C. Anderson of the University of
Michigan will talk on "Absorption
Spectra and Quinoidation" on
Wednesday, July 20 at 4:00 p.m. in
Room 1300 Chemistry Bldg.
"Americans in Canada": Dr.
Gerald S. Brown, instructor in
history, University of Michigan,
7:30 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Room 3D, Mich. Union, 1:00 p.m.
today. Some Characteristic Fea-
tures of the Dravidian Languages
of India. Prof. A. C. Sekhar, visit-
ing lecturer, University of Pennsyl-
vania.
Botanical seminar - Tonight,

. _ All

OPENING TONIGHT
The Department of Speech Presents
WH ITFORD KAN E
Distinguished Broadway and Hollywood Actor
in
THE WHIt

STEED
Wednesday thru Saturday - 8:00 P.M.
Admissions: $1.20 - 90c - 60c (tax incl.)
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater

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Save on our

IIMIIIIMI

LAST DAY!
Sa c-n"e
moon love story!
STE WART* ALLYS0 N
in MGM's
FRANK MORGAN
AlsoAGNES MOOREHEAD
Cartoon BILL WILAM
NEWS

7:30 p.m. in Rm. 1139 Natural
Science Building. Dr. Elzada U.
Clover will discuss Botanical Ex-
plorations in Grand Canyon of
Colorado and Tributaries. Doctor
Clover will supplement her dis-
cussion with colored slides and
movies. Everyone interested is in-
vited to attend.
Lecture: "Trends in Pupil Guid-
ance." Harlan C. Koch, Professor
of Education, and Assistant Dean
of the Horace H. Rackham School
of Graduate Studies. 3:00 p.m.,
Auditorium, University High
School.
Lecture: "The Health Center as
an Institution in the Program of
General Medical Care." Dr. War-
ren E. Forsythe, director of the
University of Michigana -Health
Service and Professor of Hygiene
and Public Health. 4:15 p.m., Kel-
logg Auditorium.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Preliminary Examina-
tions for Students in Education:
Preliminary examinations for doc-
toral applicants in education will
be held August 15, 16, 17. All stu-
dents who anticipate taking these
examinations must file their
names and fields of specialization
with the chairman of the Com-
mittee on Graduate Studies in Ed-
ucation, Rm. 4012, University High
School, not later than Aug. 1.
Concerts
Student Recital: Glenn Wright,
graduate student of piano with
John Kollen, will present a pro-
gram at 8:00 p.m., Wednesday,
July 20, 1949, in the Rackham As-
sembly Hall, in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the Master
of Music degree. His program will
include compositions by Bach,
Schubert, Chopin and Beethoven.
This recital is open to the public.
Organ Recital by Percival Price,
University Carillonneur. Wed., July
20, 7:15 p.m.; Friday, July 22, 7:15
p.m. - Sullivan: Selections from
The Mikado. "Come a train of
little ladies." "Braid the raven
hair." Madrigal.
Chopin-Preludes 4, 6, 7, and
15.
Price-Variations for large car-
illon on a chime tune by Sibelius.
Southern Airs-Nobody knows
the trouble I've seen; Suzanna's
(Continued on Page 3)
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Bought,
Repaired,
Rented
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
G. 1. Requisitions Accepted
. D- DMORRILL
314 South State St.
<;;;;oa<;;;;><;;;;;>a;;=0

.MEXICO PRESENTS
-"Mayan Jungle," a beach cos-
tume shown in a Mexican .x-
hibit at Waldorf-Astoria, N. Y.

I

K N 0 W S jF I C U R E -- Today's actresses are easier to
clothe than fuller-figured beauties of the past, says Mary O'Brien,
studio wardrobe head as she measures Mona Freeman, Hollywood.

I

1

.

STUDENT
BUND.LE!
All clothing laundered, fluff dried, and neatly folded.
4 LBS. MINIMUM ......50c
Each Additional Pound.. .12c
The following articles are finished at low extra charges
as follows-

Coming Thursday

JOHN PAYNE
GAIL RUSSELL

4ELPASO"

_ mmmmmw

]

SH I RTS, additional..... .15c

-
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t:
..;sax

Vnurl) he einnintt'

THE SENSATIONALa
HIT SONG
"BABY, IT'S
COLD OUTSIDE"
y t
ne

... ..v. :E:.... ..K.. .... .

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.'.',S
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FRENCH WIMSU AT
-Jean Brown models a French-
type swimsuit, Schiaparelli-de-
signed for Catalina, at a Holly-
wood fashion show. The bra can
be either with or without strap.

Il KL L I FT A 5 E N E K-Billy, mascot of the Welsh
Fusiliers, and priority airlift passenger, is escorted by LancQ)
Corporal Albert Douchty as he arrives in Berlin from London.

HANDKERCHIEFS

... 3. c

SOX, pair ............. 5c
Dress shirts and silk or wool sport shirts slightly higher.
PICK-UP and DELIVERY SERVICE
Phone 23-1-23

.. ..

* - . .2.

as

° "'

:;:wvoaaooooo oaas '. 'n..
c:

$ s r

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