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July 21, 1948 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1948-07-21

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PAGE TWO

4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 21, 1948

VIDEO TELECAST:
Students To See Television
At Speech Alumni Reunion

I Willard Custer

To Show Film

{

Students will have the oppor-
tunity of seeing television in ac-
tion next Saturday during the an-
nual Speech Department Confer-
ence and Alumni reunion.
Prof. Garnet R. Garrison, of the
speech department, will direct an
original play by Vance Simonds
which will be telecast by the mo-
VA Sets Limit
For Renewal

a

Of Insurance
The 100,00( veterans in Mich-
igan who have not renewed their
lapsed G.T. insurance have only
until July 31 to do so under the
liberal reinstatement provisions
now in effect, according to Donald
G. Bachman, local VA contact
representative.
The local VA office in the Rack-
ham Building will maintain spe-
cial office hours to accommodate
veterans wishing to reinstate be-
fore the deadline. Regular hours
will be, maintained on Saturday,
g July 24, from 8 a.m. to 4:30' p.m.
On July 31, the last day of pres-
ent regulations, the contact of-
five will be open from 8 a.m. to
midnight.
Bachman stressed that veterans
must bring an insurance certifi-
cate, premium notice, or some
other document containing the
number of their policy when they
come to reinstate.
.

bile unit of WWJ-TV, the Detroit
News. The show will be presented
at the Lydia Mendelssohn theatre
at 2:15 p.m. and will be open to
the public.
Interesting Feature
A particularly interesting fea-
ture of the demonstration will be
the chance that the audience has
to see not only the back stage
teachniques of television, but the
finished result of the telecast.
Through arrangements Prof.
Garrison has made with C. H.
Dick, manager of the Music Cen-
ter, and RCA, a number of tele-
vision sets will be located in the
theatre for direct comparison of
visual presentation and television
reception. What members of the
audience see on the screens will
be reaching them by way of the
transmitter atop the Penobscot
Building in Detroit.
Address
Harry Bannister, general man-
ager of WWJ and WWJ-TV, will
address the audience on 'Televi-
sion in Modern Society." Bannis-
ter, who has been a pioneer in the
development of the television in-
dustry, approved early last spring
an agreement between Mel Miss-
man, Program Director for WWJ-
TV and Prof. Garrison for a se-
ries of original television dramas
to be jointly produced by the
speech department and WWJ-TV.
Hopwood Winner
The first two dramas in the se-
ries originated in the station's stu-
dios. Simonds' play, "Walls of
Glass," was chosen for the on-
campus demonstration. Simonds
was winner of the major Hopwood
award in drama this spring.
The cast of the play is composed
of Marilyn Scheel, Lynne Roemer,'
Don Mitchell, Richard Charlton,
and Josh Roach.
Read ... and Use Daily
Classified Ads

Of Invention
Channel Wing To Be
Subject of Pictures
Willard R. Custer, inventor of
the Custer Channel Wing, called
one of the greatest safety devices
in modern flying, will show mov-
ies of his revolutionary design to-
day at 10 a.m. in University High
School Auditorium.
The movies are shown in con-
junction with the Aviation Edu-
cation Conference, which opened
here today. The general public is
invited to attend the showing.
Good Chance
Prof. M. L. Byrn of the educa-
tion school, chairman of the con-
ference, visited Custer in June for
two days and said that "chances
are nineteen out twenty that this
thing wil Igo over big, and be in
general use in about two years."
Custer and gellow townsmen of
Hagerstown, Md., organized a cor-
poration for the development of
the U-channel wing. Prof. Byrn
says that Custer was offered about
one million dollars for his inven-
tion by one of the big companies
but that he would rather offer it
to the smaller companies and thus
keep the price down.
Great Feature
The great feature of the chan-
nel wing is that the airplanes flies
as fast as other modern aircraft,
but its landing speed is 15 m.p.h.
It takes off at the same speed, or
rather, lack of speed, and can rise
at an angle of 45 degrees, because
of its "static lift." This allows
extremely short runways. (The
stopping distance of a machine is
proportional to the square of the
speed).
Skeptical
Engineers were skeptical at first
about the invention and told Cus-
ter that he "'couldn't pull himself
up on his bootstraps," but tests
made at Wright Field compared
it favorably to a helicopter, in its
landing possibilities.-

GETTING INTO SHAPE-Third Party Presidential candidate
Henry A. Wallace, who is going to have quite a tussle on his
hands in the November elections, engages in an old-fashioned
"Indian wrestling" match with Sidney Stolberg, independent
Progressive candidate for Congress. Wallace won four straight
falls. The match took place at a political picnic at Asbury Park,
N.J.
EDUCATION WORKSHOP:
Depressions, Dictatorships
Helped Community ,Schools

I,
4

"Out Front"--Mich. Daily
FANNY

Depression and dictatorship ac-
tually helped the community
school idea along, according to Dr.
Maurice Seay, Dean of the Admin-
istration, University of Kentucky.
"The shock of the depression
coupled with the technical effi-
ciency dictatorial nations, made
us more cognizant of the part edu-
cation could play in solving com-

Fri., Sat.

8:30 P.M.

HILL AUDITORIUM

1flp4* Ju9 coffee 4£ho'p
1204 South University,
serving
i BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS and DINNERS
SANDWICHES and SALADS
from
7:00 A.M. t-1,:00 P.M. and 5:00 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Closed Sundays

U.S. Steel Prices munity problems," Dean Seay,
said Monday, speaking to mem-
Continue Climbing bers of the University Educational
g okso for Community Lead-
NEW YORK, July 20- (AP) - ership.
Benjamin F. Fairless, president of He cited the particllar lack of
United States Steel Corporation, development in the field of com-
announced today an average in- munity schools until 1930 as the
crease in finished steel products basis of his conclusion."
of about 9.6 per cent for all sub- The overall objective of the
sidiaries of the corporation. community school program, ac-
The new prices at mille or ship- cording to Dean Seay, is a form of
ping points embrace a restoration education that serves as a multi-
of the average price reduction of ple purpose program in which all
$1.25 a ton made by the subsidia- members of the community learn
ries last April. how to live better.

"However, the community type
of school, which is utilized 24
hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week
and 52-weeks-a-year and where
cooperation is learned by actually
cooperating, is unusual and not
typical of the present American
concept of education.
"In the community school sys-
tem, the community's resources
are used and developed wisely as a
means of solving the commu-
nity's problems, and the commu-
nity's relation to state, national
and world problems."
Using an organization and pro-
gram flexible enough to adapt it-
self to a changing society, the
community system would serve
adults as well as youths with the
school environment as a demon-
stration in the proper use and
care of property, Dean Seay ex-
plained.

House Group
Investigating
Electioneering
UAW Protests Probe
As Infringing Rights
WASHINGTON, July 20-UP)-
A special Congressional commit-
tee is polling major labor, business
and religious groups on their po-
litical activities.
Committee aides said the pur-
pose is to make sure the Federal
clean politics laws are obeyed in
the 1948 elections.
Comes to Light
The poll came to light today
after a protest from a labor union,
the CIO Auto Workers, against
answering one of the committee's
questionnaires on its political ac-
tivities and campaign intentions.
The UAW 's secretary-treasurer,
Emil Mazey, agreed reluctantly in
a message to the committee to
answer the detailed queries about
the union's campaign plans.
Assertion
But Mazey asserted that the
quiz is an attempt to "intimidate
and deter labor unions in the ex-
ercise of their constitutional
rights and duties to participate
freely in the 1948 primaries and
elections."
The committee, headed by Rep.
Ross Rizley (Rep., Okla.), is a
special five-man group the House
authorized March 1 without de-
bate or objection to keep tab on
Congressional elections for pos-
sible law violations.
Similar committees have been
set up in past years.
Groups Asked
Among groups asked to answer
the questionnaires are the Re-
publican and Democratic Nation-
al Committees, the Henry Wal-
lace Committees, the CIO's Polit-
ical Action Committee and AFL's
Labor League for Political Educa-
tion, the National Association of
Manufacturers, and even relgious
organizations.
Each questionnaire is accom-
panied by a letter from chairman
Rizley suggesting that, as the
campaign gets hotter, the com-
mittee may require monthly "sup-
plements" to the original ques-
tionnaire.
Married Vets
To Get Holiday
Vacation at Fresh
Air CampPlanned
A rent-free vacation at the
University Fresh Air Camp for
married student veterans is being
planned by the campus chapter of
the American Veterans Commit-
tee.
According to Everett Bovard,
chairman of AVO', the camp will
be open to married veterans and
their families for a period lasting
from one to three weeks following
the end of the Summer Session.
The Central Lodge at the camp
and several smaller buildings will
be used by the vacationists. All
facilities will be furnished free ex-
cepting meals.
Facilities include swimming,
fishing, boating and "just plain
loafing," according to Andy War-
hola, AVC member in charge of
the outing.
Plans for registering interested
veterans are not yet complete but
an announcement will be made in
The Daily next week.
Red ... and Use Daily

Classified Ads
MICILIIAN
- NOW SHOWING --
They'll Waltz off
with your
Heart.

4 CAMERAS ___ RADIO0S
FILM BATTER I ES
DEVELOPING TUBES
PRINTING PARTS
y Purchase Radio & Camera Shop .j
Corner So. University and Church Phone 8696 .
NOW OR NEVER - Take advantage of this
ON ,-IDAY S AIL IE
a
. . . featuring .. .
1 /Fine quality Chinese Porcelain
W Straw Baskets
a Wednesday Only
IINIDJIA ART S IHIQ--IPC
330 Maynard Street
HOME of GOOD FOOD
418 East Washington
servin
'FAMILY-STYLE DINNERS
v~ Lunch 11:30 A.M. to 1:30 P.M.
~~JJ1also _ _ _ _
High Class SMORGASBORD
(Come and eat all you want)
Daily, except Friday, 11:3 0 to 1:30 and 5:00 to 8:00 P.M.
-c Sunday, 12 Noon to 6:00 P.M.
Catering to Welding Breakfast and Bridge Clubs
"~> O 'ooOOo OG=.<>OC U<t>O<UO<E>

The Hawaiian Hop, League
summer semi-formal will trans-
form the Casbah into a moonlit
Michigan edition of Waikiki
Beach, from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Sat-
urday.
Art Starr's Sextette featuring
vocalist Renee Peters will provide
the musical background for the
dance. In addition intermission
entertainment will be provided by
the songs of the Vaughan House
Trio, a hula number, a ballroom
dance team and Hawaiian music.
Special Permission
Coeds have been issued special
1:30 permission for the dance by
the Dean of Women's Office.
Tickets for the dance may be
purchased from 9 a.m. to noon and
from 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. any day

this week in the Undergraduate
Offices of the League. They are
$1.50 per couple. Tickets will also
be sold at the dance.
Palms and Leis
Lois Steere, chairman of the
Hawaiian Hop, said that the
theme of the dance will be car-
ried out with paper leis and palm
trees, and will be patterned after
a real party in the pineapple is-
lands.
The League Cafeteria Coke Bar
will serve during the dance, and
the League Garden will be open..
for a cool strollbetween numbers.
There will be no Casbah on Sat-
urday night. However, the Casbah
will be open for its regular Friday
night dance.

'U' W AIKIKI:
League To Present Hawaiian
Hop - -Summer Semi-Formal

_.__.._
i

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

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PERSONAL

" " e

. Phone 2-4531

. . . . . . .

V

THE TOWER H'#OTEL

300 South Thayer Street
(across from Hill Auditorium)

Phone 2-4531

'U

LOST: One .sailor who has strayed from
home leaving me with child. All is
forgiven. If seen- please tell him to
go to Hill. Will be there Friday and
Saturday. Poor Fanny. )43
FOR RENT
3-ROOM APARTMENT. Private bath,
first floor, for three men. Ph. 6415.
) 37
WANTED TO RENT
SINGLE or share double room for fall
near campus. Doesn't smoke or drink.
Will keep room in orderly condition.
3-year legal student. Write Box 125,
Michigan Daily. )17
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Black pocket notebook-labelled
"Harvard Cooperative Society," Re-
ward. Call Clawson, Tel. 2-9130. )51
LOST-Billfold. North side entrance,
Michigan Union, about 6:30 p.m.
Thursday. Return to desk at Michi-
gan Union, or send to Hamont Swan-
son, 1818 Paris, S.E., Grand Rapids.,
Mich. Very liberal reward. )40
Continuous from 1 P.M.
C-O-O-L
LAST TIMES TODAY
-- Feature at -
1:20-3:20-5:20-7:20-9:23
FUNNIN'and LOVIN'!

BUSINESS SERVICES
PERSONALIZED alterations - Prompt
service-custom clothes. Hildegarde
Shop, 109 E Washington, Tel. 2-4669.
)78
FOR SALE
MERCURY II camera, f2.9, speed to
1/1000 sec. Leather case. Perfect con-
dition. $45. Ring Barany 2-3143, eve-
nings 6-9. )47
9 CU. FT. CROSLEY Shelvador refrig-
erator and wardrobe trunk. 1047 Wo-
burn Court, Willow Run. )49
FULL SIZE boys' bike. Good condition.
Good tires, $18. 301 N. 7th. 2-5190. )48
MEN'S BALLOON tire bike. Excellent
condition. Phone John Dunn. 2-7946.
)46
1939 DESOTO--Radio, heater, very clean
$695. Call Ypsi 3545W3. )41
CAMERA (Perfex 55) and photo meter
(Weston Master). Call Dykstra. 5974.
)36
ANTIQUES--Cherry tables. Chests 4
barroom chairs, 5 Hitchcock chairs,
Lincoln rocker. Wing chair. Punch
bowl and cups. Miscellaneous glass,
china. Bric-a-Brac. 214 S. Ingalls. Tel.
7649. )18
DODGE '48-3 months old owner must
sell.' t-doorsedan. Low mileage, radio,
heater, seat covers. H. C. Johnsen, 551
Church, weekdays after 6:00 p.m.,
Sunday. )38
LOOKING for a place to live? We rec-
ommend life in a house trailer. 22
foot, in good condition, ready for
occupancy. Parking space lease in-
eluded in the sales agreement. 1880
Packard Road. )33
3 BEDROOM modern home. Automatic
heat, near A.A. schools and campus
bus. Comfortable housing, reasonably
priced. Address Box 126. )32

ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS for men $5 to $7.50 week until
Sept. 15 only-Breakfast optional.
1319 Hill St. )35
MISCELLANEOUS
BREAKFAST for men. 35 cents. 1319
Hill St. )34
HELP WANTED
TYPIST-Accurate, dependable. 5 half
days a week. )42
THE CHI PSI FRATERNITY whose gen-
eral headquarters are permanently
located at 1705 Washtenaw Avenue
desires an intelligent girl able to take
dictation and do general office work.
A 36 hour week under best working
conditions and the quiet and inde-
pendence of a small office. Perm-
anent position. Vacation with pay.
For appointment, phone 4617. )45
WANTED
WANTED: Sewing-dress making, re-
pairs and alterations. Mrs. Living-
ston, 315 S. Division St. )50
ROOM for married nurse near School
of Public Health. Fall semester. De-
sires breakfast and evening meals ,if
possible. Call 2-4471, Rm. 2030, be-
tween 6:30 and 7:00 p.m. )44
"Better than Marius"
FAN NY
Fri., Sat. Adm. 50c
HILL AUDITORIUM U

F

FOOD
THE CORNER HOUSE
AIR-CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT
Hours: Weekdays, 11:00 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. - 5:00 to 7:00 P.M.
Sundays, 12 Noon to 3 P.M.
Closed Mondays 202 SOUTH THAYER
STAGE COACH INN
A.A. STEAKS - SEA FOOD - FRIED CHICKEN
PARTIES BANQUETS - RECEPTIONS
For Reservations, Call 6004 - 503 E. Huron St.

6I

A few suggestions in
PIANO CONCERTOS
on
COLUMBIA RECORDS
BEETHOVEN: Concerto No. 5 (Emperor)
Serkin with N.Y. Philharmonic under Walter
MM 500.............. ..............$7.25
BRAHMS: Concerto No. 1
Serkin with Pittsburgh Orchestra under Reiner
MM 652..............................$8.50
BRAHMS: Concerto No. 2
Serkin with Philadelphia Orchestra under Ormandy
MM 584..............................$8.50
GERSHWIN: Concerto in F
Levant with N.Y. Philharmonic under Kostelanetz
MM 512....... .....................$6.00
GRIEG: Concerto in A Minor
Levant with N.Y. Philharmonic under Kurtz
MM 741..............................$6.00
LISZT: Concerto No. 1 in E Flat
Gieseking with London Philharmonic Orchestra
M X 17 ............................... $3.50
MENDELSSOHN: Concerto No. 1 in G Minor
Dorfmann with London Symphony under Goehr
M X 124 .............................. $3.50
MOZART: Concerto No. 24 in C Minor -
Casadesus with Orchestra under Bigot
MM 356..............................$6.00
SAINT-SAENS: Concerto No. 4
Casadesus with N.Y. Philharmonic under Rodzinski
MM 566................$4.75
SCHUMANN: Concerto in A Minor
Serkin with Philadelphia Orchestra under Ormandy
M M 734 ..............................$6.00
Piano music, symphonies, chamber music . . . You will
find bractically the entire. vast Columbia cataloxue-

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GRANADA CAFE
Good Food Is Good Health - Open for Your Convenience
Daily 7:30 A.M. to 12:00 Midnight
Sundays 11:30 A.M. to 12:00 Midnight
313 South State

(JOE$

A Cool Place To Dine on Fine Food!
LANTERN GARDEN
American and Chinese Dishes
Al R-C1+J flTlONFfl

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