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July 14, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1948-07-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWo

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YZ1'?YWWlyWi i .'N D1AX, t JUJUX 1%, 1948

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CAMPUS CLOSE-UP:
Betsy Barbour 'Sweetheart'
Intimately Known as Foogle

By IVAN KEELEY
"This is to certify that Robert
B. Ingle is henceforth to be known
as the sweetheart of Betsy Bar-
bour."
These words, blazoned in gold
across a background of dark blue,
are usually the first thing that
catches the eye of the occasional
foolhardy visitor to the den of
Robert Ingle, '49, alias Sweetheart,
alias Foogle.y
Old English
The impressive message repre-
sents the handiwork of a quintet
of devoted coeds residing at one
of our better known women's
dorms. It is printed in Old Eng-
lish style, on a piece of blotting
paper measuring about two by
three feet.
The document is usually dis-
played prominently above Ingle's
desk when he is in winter resi-
dence on the third floor of Chi-
cago House. He has packed it
away for the summer, however,
because he is afraid that the hot,
humid weather might injure it.
"Work of art, you know," he says.
"Foogle"
Ingle's honorary title "Sweet-
P - EAN C 1 ;U'
Beastly ,
Mich. Daily
Fri., Sat. Adm. 50c
Hill Auditorium

heart" is often supplemented by
the somewhat more interesting
appellation, "Foogle"-and there-
in lies a tale, not too complimen-
tary to The Daily, it is to be
feared. It seems that after attend-
ing the J-Hop last semester, Ingle
scanned the list of names in The
Daily for those of himself and his
fiancee, Miss Maria Lynn Riedle.
He found them listed as "Miss
Marea Flynn and Robert B.
Foogle." From that incident has
stemmed his deep and passionate
animosity toward all things jour-
nalistic.
Blames Shyness
But such things are always hap-
pening to Ingle, who blames them
on his shy, unassuming nature.
When not being dogged by bad
luck or female admirers, Ingle
dabbles in politics and zoology.
He has held nearly every office
open in the Chicago House ad-
ministration including that of
president. He aids his campaigns
with "off the cuff" speeches and
matchless renditions of Gilbert
and Sullivan favorites.
Friends Disagree
As for zoology, Ingle is making
it his major-against the advice
of his friends; who feel that his
Charles Laughton-like features
and accomplished clowning, would
be much more at home on the
stage than in the classroom. Ingle
ignores the best-meant advice, dis-
missing it with a shrug of the
shoulders and a lapse into the dia-
lect of Captain Bligh. "Mr. Chris-
tian," he is wont to say, "Mr.
Christian, mind your own bloody
business! "

BARKLEY ON THE CONVENTION SCENE-Sen. Alben W. Barkley (left) of Kentucky, in the lime-
light as a possible vice-presidential nominee, gets together on the Democratic Convention scene with
Sen. Joseph C. O'Mahoney (right) of Wyoming and Rep. John W. McCormack, of Massachusetts.

CURIOUS CLASSIFIED
Personal' raws Attention
To Problens in Education

.I

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III
a
!

U. f M.
FLYING
CLUB

By JIM DURAS
A recent personal in the classi-
fied section stirred the curiosity of
a Daily reporter, and brought to
light a novel way of underlining(
questions of public interest.
The ad, placed by a student, re-,
ferred all members to the Univer-
sity to a paragrap:i in the latestI
issue of the American Scientist I
quarterly. The paragraph was part
of an interview with Joseph W.
Barker, who thought that Univer-
sities "have been so anxious to en-
courage research that they have
forgotten the impor'tance of teach-
ing, which, after all, is the most
momentous business of an educa-!
tional institution.
Favoritism
Promotions and increase in sal-
aries, according to Barker, have
been reserved mainly for those
professors who have achieved out-
standing excellence in research to
the neglect of those who have
emphasized instruction and in-
spiration of their students.
An anonymous psychoiogy stu-
dent, asked in an interview, if he
thought this condition was a gen-

eral one, or true of this University
in particular, replied that he had
never thought about it as a gen- 1
eral practice, but supposed it could
be true. "I've only noticed it once
here," he said.
Three Types
Donald W. Lauer, psychology in-
structor, thought we needed three
classes of workers, "research peo-
ple interested in creating, schol-
ars who can evaluate, and teach-
ers to teach. While everyone has
abilities better suited to one of
these, I don't think efforts turned
toward research should in any way
be considered an excuse for poor
teaching."
Unknown Agrees
Another faculty member, who
preferred to be unnamed, echoed
these comments. He thought that,
in the literary college the empha-
sis is being placed more and more
on basic teaching qualities, though
it is hard to evaluate these objec-
tively. "A University with no re-
search people on its staff is wast-
ing its facilities," he emphasized.
"Besides, we need research, and
private research is too specific,
and available to too few."

MEETINGS ON WEDNESDAYS, 7:30
1042 East Engineering
NEW MEMBERSHIP OPENINGS

Consumers'
Living Costs
Still Advance
NEW YORK, July 13-( )- -
The cost of living is soaring with
summer temperatures all over the
country.
In a single month meat prices
have advanced from 4 to 14 cents
a pound; butter has gone up 3 to
6 cents a pound; milk is a penny
a quart higher in many places.
All indications today were a
more sensational rise in food
prices, particularly meat, is yet
to come.
A survey by the Associated
Press of the high cost of living in
15 key cities showed $1 a pound
was the common price for the
"cheaper" cuts of steak in many
cities, and was expected soon in
others.
Even in Kansas City, where fat
steers were pouring into the
stockyards and commanding rec-
ord high prices. the citizens who
wanted round steak were paying
$1.10 a pound for it, 12 cents more
than a month ago. And today's
livestock record prices have yet
to show up in the retail shops.
Slosson Club
(Continued from Page 1)
for Slosson organization is that
Young Democrats cannot come
out for any one candidate before
the state Democratic primaries
have been conducted.
The Students for Slosson meet-
ing originally scheduled at the
Union tonight will be held at 508
S. Division at 8 p.m. today.
Other Business
The Student Affairs Committee
recognized the Michigan Actuarial
Club, approved the Legislature
open air dance to be held Satur-
day, approved the League formal
on July 24 and extended coed's
hours for the affair to 1 a.m. at
the same meeting.
Fraternities and Sororities
Its sub-committee on fraternity
and sorority housing gave its ap-
proval to the rental of 1429 Hill
by the Kappa Nu fraternity, ap-
proved the purchase of 1808 Her-
mitage Road by Phi Sigma Delta
and approved the alterations on
the Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority
at 1414 Washtenaw.
AIR CONDITIONED
- ENDS TONIGHT! -

Daily Reporter
Notes Dems'
Sober Spirits
(Continued from Page 1)
tions. And there's no better place
to look for contrast than the Bell-
evue Stratford lobby. Throughout
the GOP convention it was
jammed tight. More often than
not there would be more than a
hundred people trying to board
each elevator. Now it is so sparsely
populated that some wags have
suggested it be used as a garage.
Discouraged Newsmen
Naturally all this is very dis-
couraging to newsmen whose pay-
checks depend upon their "color"
stories. After the three-ring circus
the Republicans put on it's hard
to make this one seem colorful-
even for a paycheck.
But even if the outward show
is dull, there's plenty of heat be-
ing generated in the "smoke-filled
rooms." Appropriately enough,
most of this comes from the sunny
South.
The anti-Truman Southern del-
egates have been holding caucuses
ever since Sunday. Now some of
;hemseem to have centered their
attention on Governor Laney of
Arkansas for the presidential nom-
ination. Laney is a stocky, mild-
appearing man with a powerful
voice and plenty to say about
States' Rights.
* * *
At the other end of the badly
split Democratic Party, Senator
Claude Pepper of Florida had
emerged as a candidate, backed
by no one in particular. He took
over Eisenhower headquarters, but
quit the race last night.
Whether any of the anti-Tru-
man sentiment will crystallize into
action on the convention floor re-
mains to be seen. The betting is
that the spell-binding Southern
)rators won't stay on their leashes.
* * *
Over at Convention Hall, the
Michigan delegation tonight
trotted out favorite-son Frank
Hook, former Congressman from
Ironwoo, as a candidate for the
Democratic vice-presidential nom-
ination.
Supporters of Hook claim they
have lined up some tentative sup-
port for the Michigan delegate in
other state delegations, presum-
ably in the Midwest.
It is not known, however, wheth-
er Hook's name will be presented
to the convention. Michigan lead-
ers say they "don't want to pull
a Kim Sigler." They will sit tight
until the extent of Sen. Alben
Barkley's support has been deter-
mined.
Changes Horses
Michigan was formerly listed in
the O'Mahoney camp, but the
North Dakotan withdrew today,
believing Barkley to be Truman's
choice.
The Michigan group had prev-
iously announced that its 42 votes
would go to Harry Truman for
the presidential nomination.
Originally the Wolverine dele-
gation was uncommitted and it
was thought that several delegates'
would hold out for Justice Doug-
las. The loud "no" from Oregon,
however, cut the ground out from
under them.
General "Ike" Ftenhower's last
firm shake of the head left Cyril
Bevins of Detroit out on a limb.
The limb was sawed off Sunday
night when the Michigan Demo-
cratic delegation in a noisy caucus
ousted the delegate-at-large from
his national committeeman's post.
He was succeeded by George

Fitzgerald, Detroit attorney, from
the 14th District.
MIC IIGAN
- ENDING TONIGHT -.
NE/iW YORK CR/TICS' PlAY
AWARD BECOMES THE
PRIZE MOTION PICTURE!

CONVENTION HALL, Philadel-
phia, July 13--0")-Helen Gaha-
gan Douglas, the Democrats' an-
swer to Republican Clare Boothe
Luce, accused the GOP tonight
of having "danced on the grave of
a dead President."
The brunette California Con-
gresswoman occupied on the Dem-
ocratic National Convention pro-
gram the same spot held three
weeks ago at the Republican con-
vention by her former colleague
in Congress, the blonde Mrs. Luce.
Danced on Grave
"For five sweltering days," she
said, the GOP convention "danced
on the grave of a dead president."
"The opposition would have us
believe that the dominant figure
at their recent convention was
their Presidential nominee; in fact,
they would like to believe that
themselves. The dominant figure
of that convention was Franklin
Delano Roosevelt, and the Amer-
ican people know it."
The Republicans, she said,
"shivered in the fear that the phi-
losophy of Franklin Delano Roose-
velt still lives in the hearts of the
American people. Their fear was
well founded."
Doubletalk
"It will take more than con-
vention doubletalk to obscure the
onslaught of the Republican Party
in the 80th Congress against the
progressive, Democratic program

1204 South University
serving
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of the last decade" and "to make
the people forget that the Re-
publican 80th Congress did noth-
ing about education, health, hous-
ing, the cost of food-the things
that make America tick."
Mrs. Douglas said millions of
Americans want to know whether
the Democratic Party "is still the
people's party, a vigorous and dy-
namic force, aware of the total
needs of men and aware of the
terrible responsibility of govern-
ment in July, 1948."
jPRINT~ING
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ANSWER TO LUCE:
Helen Douglas Accuses GOP
Of 'Dancing' on FDR's Grave

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A Cool Place To Dine on Fine Food!
LANTERN GARDEN
American and Chinese Dishes
AIR-CONDITIONED
Quick Service --- Plate Luncheons
CHOP SUEY - CHOW MEIN TO TAKE OUT
Reasonable Prices

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Located
613 E. Liberty,
by Michigan Theatre

Phone
6380

Open Every
Day Except
Monday

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FOOD
THE CORNER HOUSE
AIR-CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT
Hours: Weekdays, 11:00 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. - 5:00 to 7:00 P.M.
Sundays, 12 Noon to 3 P.M.

Publications in The Daily Official
B1ulletin is constructive notice to all
memb~ers of the Uniiversity. Notices for
the Bulletin should be sent in type-
written form to the Office of the Sur-
mer Session, Room 1213 Angeli Hall, by
3:00 p.m. on the day preceding publi-
cation (11:00 pm. Saturdays)
Notices
WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 1948
VOL. LVIII, No. 184
Veterans enrolled under Public
Law 346 arc reminded that they
will automatically receive sub-
sistence for an additional fifteen
dayg beyond the close of the Sum-
mer Session. Consequently, fifteen
days of eligibility time will be de-
ducted from their remaining en-
titlement. It should be emphasized
that this procedure is automatic
and that payments will be made
and entitlement reduced accord-
ingly unless a veteran notifies the
Veterans Administration in writ-
ing thirty days prior to the close
of the Summer Session that he
does not desire the extension of
subsistence benefits. Veterans who
desire the fifteen days extension
are not required to give any no-
tice.
The following form is suggested
for notification: "This is to no-
tify you that I do not desire the
fifteen days extension of subsist-
ence benefits following the close of
the Summer Session, 1948. Signa-
ture, "C" Number, Reference

29R7AA." The notice should be
sent to Registration and Research
Section, MichiganuUnit, Veterans
Administration, Guardian Build-
ing, 500 Griswold Street, Detroit
32, Michigan.
Veteran Students:
1. Monday, Aug. 2, 1948, has
been established as the deadline
date for the purchase of books,
equipment and supplies with vet-
eran requisitions.
2. All veteran students who were
not asked to sign Veterans Admin-
istration Form 7-1950A at regis-
tration, whose expenses exceed the
rates below, must clear these over-
charges by signing the above men-
tioned form or making a cash
payment at the Cashier's Office,
Veteirans Section.
$ 56.32 for 4 weeks.
$ 70.40 for 5 weeks.
$ 84.12 for 6 weeks.
$112.64 for 8 weeks.
$140.80 for 10 weeks.
All overcharges must be taken
care of by Wed., Aug. 11, 1948.
Students, College of Engineerin:
The final day for DRPPING
COURSES WITHOUT RECORD
will be Fri., July 16. A course may
be dropped only with the permis-
sion of the classifier after confer-
ence with the instructor.
"Gradute students are remind-
ed that courses dropped after
noon of July 17th will be re-
corded with the grade of E.
(Continued on Page 4)

F

-~ -

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