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June 23, 1948 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1948-06-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rESDAY, ?1h~ 23, 1949

r THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MARK DEVALUATION:
Questionable Effect on Economy-Bretton

By ARTHUR MOSKOFF
However plausible it may seem
that the black market will not be
wiped out while there is no pro-
duction of consumer goods, it is
too early to make predictions as
to the future effect of the recent
revaluation of currency in the
Western zones of Germany, ac-
cording to Henry L. Bretton of
the political science department.
Bretton was with OSS in Ger-
rmany from January through No-1
vember of 1945 and bases much of
his opinion on the practical expe-
V.

rience he gained from his rela-
tionships there.
No Unity
"Oneof the prime difficulties,"
Bretton said, "in studying the new
monetary system arises from the
fact that there has been no unity
of purpose among the western oc-
cupiers as to whether German in-
dustry should be re-encouraged to
develop. Consequently, it is doubt-
ful whether the new mark will
have any positive effect in either
stimulating or encouraging in-
vestment and production."
He pointed out that the new sys-

tem should have the positive ef-
fect of wiping out those large
black market money concentra-
tions which were made both dur-
ing the war and in the subsequent
two-year period of unstable
peace.
Probably the most interesting
aspects of the change will be seen
in the German attitude as it will
influence East-West political re-
lationships, he commented.
Lead to Unification
The revaluation is "one con-
certed step in what is hoped will
lead to a unified Germany," Bret-
ton said.
The Germans realized that their
best interests lie in playing one
side against the other. They can
best gain when there is constant
conflict that will neither result in
stagnation on the one hand, or
chaotic war on the other, he said.
The reactions of the Russians to
the new system, in closing the
western border to all commerce in
the new currency, "is food for the
German policy."

'U' ROTC Cadets Deploy

Approximately 50 University
students will be stationed in six-
weeks cadet - training camps
throughout the United States this
summer.
ROTC cadets from more than 50
other schools will also attend
training camps as part of the pro-
gram leading toward reserve
commissions.
Service branches and their
training sites are:

Michigan Signal Corps, Fort
Monmouth, N. J.; Quartermaster
Corps, Camp Lee, Va.; Transpor-
tation Corps, Camp Eustace, Va.;
Engineer Corps, Fort Bellvoir, Va.;
Military Police, Fort Sheridan,
Ill.; Infantry, Cmp Campbell,
Ky.; Ordnance Corps, Aberdeen
Proving Grounds, Md.; Medical
Corps, Fort Sam Houston, Tex.;
Air Corps, Chanute Field, 111.

S 7a ardle
Sun-'n-CL@UD

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Daily Staffers
See Glamour
Of Convention
(Continued from Page 1)
locked in a vigorous battle of
beauty. Each has hired every good
looking girl it can find to pass out
campaign buttons,. fans, cigarette
holders and overseas caps in hotel
lobbies. Four queens from Swarth-
more college swathed in Dewey
ribbons admitted privately that
none favored the Governor. "It's
a wonderful chance to get into
television, though," one explained.
More Pretty Girls
Even in Convention Hall which
is supposed to be jammed with
hard working politicians a great
number of pretty girls are in evi-
dence, even on the stage itself.
Actually, the hall wasn't over half
full for the first session, and prob-
ably will not approach capacity
until the balloting begins but nev-
ertheless there are thousands of
people outside dying for a peek
at the Convention who'll never
get it except over television.
Mrs. Dudley Hay of Detroit is
making history as the first woman
ever to serve as secretary of a Re-
publican National Convention.
Sig'ar Works
Governor Kim Sigler also is
much in the news, currently in
charge of seeing that Senator
Vandenberg is nominated. Few be-
lieve the Governor himself will
make the speech, preferring that
it come from another state dele-
gation.
The Michigan delegation which
Sigler heads is in the front row
and the Governor is less than ten
feet from the speakers' rostrum.
This has its disadvantages, how-
ever, because everytime a new
face appears on the rostrum the
army of photographers climbs all
over Sigler's freshly pressed suit.
Regents ...
(Continued from Page 1)
parative law in the Law School,
and Paul W. McCracken will be-
come a professor of business con-
ditions in the Bus. Ad. School.
Two appointments in the music
school include the naming of
David Dawson as visiting profes-
sor of viola and chamber music
and Maynard Klein as a professor
of choral music.
The Regents also accepted gifts
totaling $200,515.78, the largest
of which was the sum of 81,152.67,
from the bequest of the late Mary
W. D'Ooge, of Ann Arbor. The
money is to be used for the en-
dowment of one or more fellow-
ships in classical studies.
Mrs. Golden F. LeGro, of
Grosse Pointe Farms, made a gift
of $25,000, to establish the Dr.
Albert Leland LeGeo Fellowship
in dentistry.
The Carnegie Corporation of
New York bestowed a grant of
$20,000 for the support of post-
doctoral fellowships in economics,
the purpose of which will be to
study the application of survey
techniques to economic research.
Contributions from various
sources to 45 funds already estab-
lished amounted to $19,301.95. A
number of gifts not in the form of
cash were also accepted.
Awards Made
Two post-doctoral fellowships
were awarded recently in the
Graduate School, Dean Ralph A.

Sawyer has announced.
The winners are Dr. Richard F.
O'Dell, Beth Elain Cook, and Dr.
Andre S. Dreiding.
O'Dell received the Alfred H.
Lloyd Post-doctoral Fellowship for
a year's study and research on the
early history of the anti-slavery
movement in Ohio.

i
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f

Men's House
Purchased by
Coop Council
Purchase of another cooperative
house, to be used to accommodate
men in the fall, was made recently
by the Intercooperative Council.
The building, located at 807 S.
State, is the John M. Nakamura

i

WITH DETACHABLE HOOD
An all-purpose coat for all kinds of
weather. In colors of grey, beige, dark
green and coral . .
$3500
Also
Plastic raincoats with detachable
hoods.

BUTTONS - Barbara Grand-
bergh, 19, of New Jersey, N.J.,
wears a novel bathing suit in
Philadelphia featuring cam-
paign buttons of leading presi-
dential possibilities. Watch for
The Daily's special coverage of
the Convention.
Publie Health
Session Begirwi
Some 250 persons yesterday at-
tended the opening session of al
four-day national sanitation con-
ference held in the Scnool of
Public Health.
The conference was split into 12
discussion groups each dealing
with a different aspect of sanita-
tion. Agendas were drawn up and
full-scale discussion willl get un-
derway today.
The attending delegates are rep-
resentatives from leading Amer-
ican industrial concerns and
public health officials.
The conference will consider
such problems as sanitation in
bars, restaurants, eating places,
drug stores, factories and public
buildings.
SALE
O SALE
SALE
Must make room
for new
SHIPMENTS U
INDIAA
SHOP
330 Maynard Street

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$500

House in honor of a former ICC
member killed in action during
World War IL
Leading Figure
Nakamura, whose two brothers
and a sister are still active in co-
ops on this campus, was a leading
figure in the wartime cooperative
houses. After being discharged
from the peacetime draft because
of his Nisei descent, he re-enlisted
in the army and was killed in ac-
tion in Italy in April, 1945.
The down payment on Naka-
mura House was financed by loans
from ICC members, faculty, alum-
ni and from the operating surplus
of the ICC.
'Torment' Helbred
Another part of the down pay-
ment was provided from the pro-
ceeds of the ICC-sponsored show-
ing of "Torment" at the Art Cin-
ema League last semester.
The houshe will accommodate
40 men.
As a result of the purchase, the
women's cooperative housing will
also be expanded.

r

-,

BEER - WINES
CHAMPAGNES

S.D.D. for Michigan State
Liquor Control Commission

I

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CARRYING CASE
AT NO EXTRA COST-WITH YOUR

CUT-RATE DRUG STORE
DRUGS and COSMETICS
featured at
lowest possible prices

SHOP AND SAVE AT

COLLINS
. . Liberty at Maynard

_N

THE "MIDRIFF"
a summer fayorite

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rr . >fy '

4g

:: -.

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;.c1

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(~.7 -M

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f

o Medical, Law,
\ Public Health

64
f .

and Dental, Books
" Reference Books
* Student Supplies
" Stationery
" Greeting Cards

See our colorful charming collec-
tion of midriffs in so many flat-
tering styles. Priced so low, you'll
want several to greet every sun-
lnvinn nrrnsion Thev team rner-

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