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July 31, 1948 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1948-07-31

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SATURDAY, JULY 31, 1948

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

mericanHigh Jumpers Fail;

Three 100

Aces

Win

I - ________________________________________________________________________________________________

Champions
Go in Fight
Double Bill
NEW YORK, July 30-(IP)-A
boxing doubleheader featuring
world title bouts between light
heavyweights Gus Lesnevich and
Freddie Mills, and middleweights
Topy Zale and Marcel Cerdan,
was announced today by the Tour-
nament of Champions, Inc.
The bouts will be held in Ebbets
Field, Brooklyn, probably Sept. 23.
The bouts, the site and dates
still must be approved by the New
York State Athletic Commission.
Lesnevich vs. Mills
Although the Cerdan-Zale bout
had been arranged previously it
was not until today that the pro-
motional group entered in the
light-heavyweight picture. Lesne-
vich lost his title to Mills in Lon-
don on July 26 by decision.
This double-barreled program
will mark the first time two world
championships have been con-
tested on the same card since the
original "Tournament of Cham-
pions" Sept. 23, 1937, the show
that established Mike Jacobs as a
big-time boxing promoter.
Ross-Ambers in Last Twin Bill
On that program, staged at
Madison" Square Garden Bowl on
Long Island, Barney Ross defend-
ed the welterweight title by out-
pointing Cerferino Garcia and
Lou Ambers defeated Pedro Mon-
tanez to keep his lightweight
crown. A third bout on the card
was a ten rounder between Marcel
Thil of France, generally recog-
nized middleweight champion, and
Fred Apostoli. This was not sanc-
tioned as a title bout by the New
York State Athletic Commission.
Zale and Cerdan, who had
signed some time ago for their ti-
tle scrap, agreed to new percen-
tages in view of the added attrac-
tion, Niederreiter said. He did not
disclose what their shares would
be other than to remark that the
middleweights will take their cut
from the top of the net gate.

Major League'
Standings
Yesterday's Results
St. Louis 6, Boston 2
Pittsburgh 10, Brooklyn 5
New York 9, Chicago 1
Philadelphia 8, Cincinnati 5

Roy Cochran Smashes
400-Meter Hurdle Mark
Patton, Ewell, Dillard, Whitfield Triumph;
Zatopek, Czech Star, Cops 10,000 Meters

Groza Leads U.S. Cagers.
In 86-21 Win Over Swiss

(Continued from Page 1)

NATIONAL
W
Boston........55
Brooklyn .... 48
New York ... 48
St. Louis .... 47
Pittsburgh .. 45
Philadelphia 46
Cincinnati 41
Chicago.......39

LEAGUE
L Pct.
38 .591
42 .530
43 .527
44 .516
45 .500
49 .484
53 .436
55 .414

G.B.
.)
5%
6
7
8%
10
141 2
161,

Today's Games
Chicago at New York - (2) -
Rush (2-8) and McCall (1-6) vs
Poat (9-4) and Kennedy (0-30
Pittsburgh at Brooklyn-Sewell
(5-3) vs Palica (4-5)
St. Louis at Boston-(night)--
Pollet (6-5) vs Spahn (9-7)
Cincinnati at Philadelphia -
(2)-Fox (4-5) and Walters (0-1)
vs Simmons (5-10) and Dubiel
(5-6)
* * *

Yesterday's Results
Boston 8, Cleveland 7
Washington 3, St. Louis 2
Detroit 17, Philadelphia 2
Chicago 8, New York 7

AMERICAN
W
Boston ......57
Philadelphia . 57
Cleveland ...52
New York ... 53
Detroit.......46
Washington . 40
St. Louis......33
Chicago......31

LEAGUE
L Pct.
37 .606
40 .587
38 .577
39 .576
47 .494
52 .434
55 .375
61 .340

G.B.
1%
3
3
10'
16
21
25

Today's Games
New York at Chicago-Lopat
(10-5) vs Papish (1-2) .
Philadelphia at Detroit -Mc-
Cahan (1-3) vs Houtteman (2-12)
Boston at Cleveland -Dobson
(13-6) vs Feller (10-12)
Washington at St. Louis -
(night) - Masterson (8-5) vs
Schwamb (0-0).

i ...

S

30 Balls 50c, 65 Balls $1
(Includes Use of Clubs)
No Waiting - 30 Tees
Lighted for Night Play
HOP'S HAVEN
GOLF DRIVING RANGE
3200 Washtenaw
East of Warner Dairy

HARRISON DILLARD
SATURDAY'S OLYMPIC
SCHEDULE
(All times are Central
(By The Associated Press)
Standard)
TRACK AND FIELD
3:00 a.m.---Hammer throw
preliminaries.
4:00 a.m.-Broad jump pre-
liminaries.
4:00 a m -Pole vault pre-
liminaries.
6:15 a.m.-Start of 50,000-
meter (31 miles, 120 yards)
walk.
7:30 a.m.-Women's javelin
final.
7:30 a.m.-100-meter (109.36
yards) semifinals.
7:45 a.m.-Women's 100-me-
ter preliminaries.
8:15 a.m.-800-meter (874.9
:yards) semifinals.
8:30 a.m.-400-meter (437.45
yards) hurdle final.
8:30 a.m.-Hammer throw
final.
8:45 a.m.-100-meter final.
9:00 a.m.-5,000-meter (3
miles 188 yards) prelimi-
naries.
9:45 a.m.-Broad jump final.
10:30 a.m.-Finish of 50,000
meter walk.
SWIMMING
2:00 a.m.-Men's springboard
diving.
7:00 a.m. to 10 a.m.-Wom-
en's springboard diving,
women's 200-meter (218.72
yards) breast stroke semi-
finals, men's 100-meter
free style final.
Noon to 3 p.m.-Women's 100-
meter freestyle semi-finals.
Men's 400-meter free style
preliminaries.
BASKETBALL
2:00 a.m. to 7:00 a.m. and
noon, first round games
continued.
FENCING
2:00 a.m.-Foil team final.
2:00 a.m.-Women's indivi-
dual foils preliminaries.
7:00 a.m.-Foil team final.
7:00 a.m.-Women's indivi-
dual foils preliminaries.
SOCCER
11:30 a.m.-First round
matches.
FIELD HOCKEY
11:00 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.-
First round matches.
PENTATHLON
2:00 a.m.-Epee.
WATER POLO
3:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.-First
round matches.
WRESTLING
3:00 a.m. to 6:30 a.m.-First
round matches.
ROYAL PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
IN STOCK
Foreign Language Keyboards
Also Available
GUARANTEED
REPAIR WORK
RENTAL TYPEWRITERS
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
SERVICE CO.
111 So. Fourth Ph. 2-1213

second heat, and Barney Ewell of
Lancaster, Pa., twice did 10.5
without being hard-pressed. Ewell
tied the world record of 10.2 in
winning the U. S. Olympic trials.
Of the nine other sprinters who
came through the prelims, Lloyd
La Beach of Panama appeared the
most likely to fight it out with the
American trio in tomorrow's semi-
finals and finals. He twice hit the
tape in 10.5 to win his heats,
though it took a photo to separ-
ate him from John Treloar of Aus-
tralia the second time. Treloar, a
big fellow, looked good.
The blow that really rocked
the Americans' was their com-
plete breakdown in the high
jump, which eventually was won
at the indifferent height of 6
feet, 6 inches by a bank clerk
from Perth, Australia, named
John Winter. This compares to
Cornelius Johnson's winning
height of 6 feet, 7 15/16 inches
at Berlin and the world mark of
6-11 held by Les Steers of the
United States.
B. Paulson of Norway took sec-
ond at 6 feet, 43/4 inches, while
George Stanich of CLA and
Dwight Eddleman of Illinois had
to be content with equal third,
though they got over at the same
height as Paulson. They required
more chances in their earlier
jumps than did Paulson.
Vern McGrew, the 18-year-
old Rice Institute !tar who cap-
tured the American tryouts with
a leap of 6 feet, 81 inches, ap-
peared to suffer a bad case of
nerves before today's great
crowd and went out with the bar
at 6 feet 3-Y4. He missed badly
on all three attempts at that
height, running under the bar
the second time.
With the bar at 6-6, Eddleman
got up high enough on each of his
three tries, but each time came
down on the shaft. Stanich looked
like he was going over the last

time, but his back leg played him
false at the last instant.
The first victor of the 1948
games proved to be a pretty
French girl, Mlle. M. O. M. Os-
termeyer. While the men were
running off their heats furiously
all around her, she fluffed her
hair and threw the discus far-
ther than any of 20 rivals-137
feet, s6inches. She was the
first to stand on the simple
white dais and hear her heart
pound as the band and the
crowd saluted her.
Gentile Cordiale of Italy took
second place at 135 feet, %/ inch.
The two American entries, Fran-
ces Kaszubski of Cleveland, Ohio,
and Dorothy Dodson of Munde-1
lein, Ill., failed to get the dish out
far enough to join the last six
qualifiers in the event.
Zatopek also is entered in the
5,000 meters, and most of the ex-
perts expect him to bring off the
double. No other runner-not
even Paavo Nurmi-ever has won
both the distance events in the
Olympics.
Of the 24 runners who quali-
ved from i six heats in the 800
meters, Mal Whitfield, a Staff
Sergeant in the U. S. Air Force,
turned in the best time. His
1:52.8 in the final heat gave him
the honor over Arthur Wint of
Jamaica, who had turned in a
fine-looking 1:53.9 in an earlier
effort.
The second record tying per-
formance by an American was the
work of Wally Ris, sprint swim-
mer from the University of Iowa.
Forgetting all about his throbbing
knee, Ris splashed the 100 meters
in 57.5 seconds to the mark estab-
lished by Japan's H. Taguchi at
Berlin in 1936.
Alan Ford of Yale and Keith
Carter of Purdue advanced with
Ris into the finals of the century,
and the three men divers also
swept ahead in the springboard
diving.

BARNEY EWELL

Late Scores
Chicago ....... . ... . 1 4 0
New Yirk .............. 9 12 0
Hamner, Lade (6), Dobernic (8)
and McCullough; Jones and Coop-
er
Pittsbury h .............10 14 p
Brooklyn ................5 7 1
Chesnes and Kluttz; Branca,
Minner (4), Casey (7) and Cam-
panella
St. Louis ...............6 12 0
Boston ................ 2 6 0
Brecheen and Rice; Sain, Hogue
(8), Shoun (8), Barrett (9) and
Masi
Cincinnati ............8 10 1
Philadelphia..........8 10 2
Blackwell, Raffenberger (3),
Gumbert (7), Cress (8) and Wil-
liams, Lamanno (7); Roberts
and Seminick.
Philadelphia...........2 8 2
Detroit ...............17 17 1
J. Coleman, Harris (4), Schieb
(6) and Rosar, Guerra (5);
Hutchinson and Swift.
Boston ................8 12 1
t ;and .............7 6 1
Parnell, Galehouse (1) and
Tebbetts; Bearden, Black (2),
Paige (4), Gromek (9) and He-
gan, Tipton (9).

LONDON, July 30-(;/PI-Amer-
ica's heavily favored basketball
forces overwhelmed Switzerland,
86 to 21, in 'their opening Olympic
test today but Coach Omar (Bud)
Browning complained "We don't
look so hot."
"We'll be twice as good when
we've had a couple games," he
added.
Alex Groza, University of Ken-
tucky's crack playmaker, lit the
scoring fuse for the Americans
Golf Unknown
Leads .Field 1in
Wes tern Open
BUFFALO, N. Y., July 30-(P)-
Michael Parco, a 33-year-old driv-
ing range operator playing in his
first tournament in ten years, ex-
ploded into the lead today in the
45th Western Open Golf Cham-
pionship.
Parco, whose tee-shot establish-
ment is just six miles down the
road from the rugged Brookfield
Country Club course, carved out a
scintillating 35-32-67 through the
wind and rain.
That effort, added to his spar-
kling 69 of yesterday, gave him
136 strokes, eight under par, at
the halfway mark in the 72-hole
test.
He has a tough chore staying at
the peak, however, for Ben Hogan
from Hershey, Pa., National Open
and PGA champ, and the year's
to money winner, is snapping at
his heels.

-- Last Times Today --

THRILLING' ROMANCE!
THRILL-SWEPT
.i <.' ADVENTURE!

with 19 points. He dropped in
nine field goals and one free
throw. ._
Kurland Fouls Out
The team's offensive specialist,
seven-foot Bob Kurland of the
Phillips Oilers, fouled out about
midway of the contest and regis-
tered only nine points.
Although Uncle Sam's boys were
never bothered, leading 34-9 at in-
termission, Browning said their
workmanship was hampered by
the different style of officiating.
Also, Browning said, the Swiss
didn't react to the Americans'
clever faking tactics, and it was
necessary early in the game to re-
vert to simpler maneuvers.
Gain Two Points
The victory gave the United
States two points in the Olympic
basketball standings table. A team
gets two points -for victory and
one for losing.
The Czechs, European Cham-
pions and the chief threat of the
U. S. in the prelims, had a tough
time with Peru in a close game but
survived, 38 to 30.

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

COOL

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

I

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v FAMILY-STYLE DINNERS
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Catering to Wedding Breakfast and Bridge Clubs

TRANSPORTATION
SELLING R.R. TICKET to N.Y.C.
(Coach), $20. Call "Max," 4489. )95
PERSONAL
UNCLE ELIZABETH now in "I Re-
member Mama" offered for adoption
to right party. Call 2-0666. )78
Is there a family near campusinter-
ested in giving a graduate student
her room and evening meals begin-
ning fall semester in return for baby
sitting and dish-washing? write box
128. )82
EMPLOYMENT
WILLOW RUN Cooperative Nursery now
-interviewing applicants for assistant
teacher. Nursery School Training re-
quired. Write or call, Mrs. W. W.
Gardner, 925 Lynn Ct. Willow Run
Village. Ph. Ypsi, 3576W11. )92
WANTED
ROOM IN EXCHANGE for work about
the house. Male student, age 25. Ad-
dress, Box 130, Michigan Daily. )90
6x30 BAUSCH and Lomb or Zeiss binoc-
ulars with case. New or second hand.
Write full particulars. Box 131, Mich.
Daily. ) 93
BUSINESS SERVICES
AUGUST IS THE MONTH TO THINK
OF FALL CLOTHES. For the entire
month we are specializing in altera-
tion. Let us adapt your last year's
wardrobe to this year's styles. Bring
your sewing problems to us. Hilde-
garde Shop, 109 E. Washington. Tel.
2-4669.
LAUNDRY-Washing and ironing done
in my home. Free 1)k-up and deliv-
ery, Phone 2-9020. )79

LOST: Green Schaeffer pen-wide gold
band on cap. V. Wassel 2-4547. )99
LOST: Tan jacket in Room 1055 or
2075, East Engineering Building, Jul.y
27. Prof. Morkovin, phone 3-1511 ext.
2466. ) 98
LOST--Gray and gold Parker 51. Phone
Mary Kershner, 3-1511, ext. 2466.
FOUND-Ladies gold wrist watch. Call
5246. ) 89
LOST: Billfold containing important
papers, State Theater, Sat. 24. Call
John Dougherty, Univ. Ext. 2198. )69
LOST:3 keys in black leather contain-
er. Phone 8768. )83
WANTED TO RENT
ROOM AND/OR BOARD wanted for
young man who is entering his Junior
in September. Highest references and
credentials offered. Please wirte to
A. Kast, 555 Beverly Rd., Merrick,
L. I., N.Y. )87
LAW STUDENT and wife need apart-
ment before September 1st. Write de-
tails, price: S. Fisher, 110 Linden Ave.,
Buffalo, New York. )75
FRATERNITY desires annex preferably.
Or several rooms for fall and follow-
ing semesters. Call Bob Reinheimer.
4315. 5-8 P.M. )73
SINGLE ROOM, half, double,ror any
other rooming facilities for male
student desired for fall. Call 2-4591,
422 Cooley House. East Quad. )42

LOST AND FOUND

FOR SALE
MICROSCOPE: Spencer compound,
monocular, like new. Call 3-1511, ext.
2417. )88
MONTH OLD three-quarter coil spring
bed with inner spring mattress. Phone
2-5588. Messerschmidt. )91
HOUSE TRAILER: 28' x 46'. Lived in 3
mos. Cost $3,200, now $2,100. Space
available, see R. L. Welty, 1472 Spring-
field, Willow Run. )76
1937 BUICK-Radio, Heater. Good con-
dition. Best offer. Ph. 2-3537 even-
ings )86
WHIZZER Motor Bike. Used 3 months;
perfect running order. Win. Lakey,
517 ' E. Washington. )81
8 CUBIC FOOT Kelvinator refrigerator.
Double bed, box springs, mattress.
Two burner hot plate, 6-way floor
lamp. Box 129, Mich. Daily. )84
BICYCLES, 1 man's & 1 girl's, each
with basket and lock. Phone 2-5643.
)85
ALL COLORS baby parakeets and ca-
naries. Bird supplies, cages. Mrs.
Ruffins, 562 S. Seventh St. )97
JUST 10 MINUTES from campus and
an inexpensive, comfortable way to
live. 22 foot housetrailer, in good
condition, ready for occupancy. Park-
ing space lease included in sales
agreement. 1880 Packard Road. )2
NEW SCHWINN Men's Bicycle. 4 mos.
use. Must sell. Ph. 2-4591, Rm. 222. )1

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TWO HEARTS IN WALTZ TIME"
English A A

Did You Know-
YOU CAN
BANK BY MAIL!
Save time, effort, and eliminate the parking
problem by mailing us your banking mater-
ial. Ask for special envelopes at our bank.

THE CORNER HOUSE
AIR-CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT
Hours: Weekdays, 11:00 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. - 5:00 to 7:00 P.M.
Sundays, 12 Noon to 3 P.M.
Closed Mondays 202 SOUTH THAYER
STAGE COACH INN
A.A. STEAKS - SEA FOOD - FRIED CHICKEN
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For Reservations, Call 6004 503 E. Huron St.
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Daily 7:30 A.M. to 12:00 Midnight
Sundays 11:30 A.M. to 12:00 Midnight
313 South State

Make it a date this week-end to visit our
dining room and enjoy one of our deli-

cious LOBSTER DINNERS.

Fri., Sat., July 30,31

8:30 P.M.

We invite you to come in and let us

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