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June 28, 1947 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-06-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATUIRDAY, JUNE NS, 1947t

UMMER HOPWOOD :
Contest Encourages Unusual
Writing for 1947 Awards

The new, the unusual and th
l adical will be especially encour-
paed in the 1947 summer sessioi
Avery and Jule Hopwood contes
In creative writing, in accordanc
with the bequest of Avery Hop
Wood to the University regents.
Eight prizes, one of $75 and on
If $50 in each of the four field
6f writing-drama, essay, fictio
And poetry-will be awarded on
August 14 to contest winners. All
tegularly enrolled summer session
students who have been doing
work of passing grade in all cours-
es up to August 8, when manu-
scripts must be handed in, and
Who are enrolled in one course in
English composition in the Eng-
hanges ...
(Continued from Page 1)
town which is predominantly one-
party and where the primaries are
On a wide-open basis, whether the
elections are partisan or non-part
tisan.
Probably fifty per cent of his
appointments have been men of
Democratic leaning, Brown said,
nd he emphasized that he has
never looked into the party loyal-
ties of a man before making the
appointments.
F r o m the political science
standpoint, Prof. Arthur W. Brom-
age says that partisanship has no
place in city government. He fav-
Srs a council elected on an "at-
arge non-partisan" basis which
would not then represent "Dem-
~crats or Republicans or one se-
ion of the city",but rather the
city as a whole.
Concerning the history of muni-
Cipal government Prof. Bromage
#aid that the present Ann Arbor
form, that of "weak mayor, city
bouncil", is the traditional Ameri-
can type, and it wasn't until the
.urn of the century that the com-
(nission form became popular in
┬░ity charters. In about 1915 the
&ity manager form had its incep-
ion and since then its growth has
been "phenomenal" Prof. Brom-
age said.
Need Accurate
Study of Fluids
In order to predict the transfer
rate of heat and materials through
fluids chemical engineers need
more accurate experimental and
theoretical knowledge of fluids,
Prof. Robert R. White of the
Chemical Engineering Department
said yesterday.
Prof. White also discussed some
of the research.problems in chem-
ical engineering relating to the
use of fluidized solid cataysts,
agents which speed up chemical
reactions.
TAVERN
CAFETERIA
LUNCH 11:00-1:30
DINNER 5:00-7:00
338 MAYNARD STREET
Opposite the Arcade

ish or journalism departments,
tre eligible to enter the Hopwood
ontest-except those who have
dlready competed three times in
;ummer contests, or who have al-
ready won a major Hopwood
award.
Eligibility
Compositions which have re-
-eived prizes in Hopwood con-
tests,dor which have been publish-
ed in a medium other than a col-
lege magazine or newspaper, are
not eligible in the contest.
Opened to students in the sum-
mer session for the first time in
1938, Hopwood contests have been
conducted for the past 15 years.
Approximately $8,500 has been
awarded to University students
each year from the investment in-
come of funds of one-fifth of Av-
ery Hopwood's estate, given to the
Regents of the University under
terms of a will drawn up in 1922.
Hopwood, prominent American
dramatist who graduated from the
University in 1905, empowered the
Regents to use the income from
his gift in perpetuity as prizes to
be awarded annually to students
in the rhetorichdepartment who
perform "the best creative work
in the fields of dramatic writing,
fiction, poetry, and the essay."
No Accumulaton
The incomecould not be al-
lowed to accumulate from year
to year, Hopwood stipulated, add-
ing that it was "especially desired
that the students competing for
the prizes shall not be confined t
academic subjects, but shall be
allowed the widest possible lati-
tude ."
In 1930, when the rhetoric and
English departments were fused,
the requirement restricting stu-
dents to the former was changed
in fact to students enrolled in the
Department of English Language
and Literature. Later, journalism
students were also permitted to
compete.
Awards in the 1946 summer ses-
sion contest were as follows: dra-
ma: Robert G. True, $75; Mary V.
Echols, $50; fiction: Laurence E.
Mascott, $75; Richard Flewell,
$50; Barbara Carter, $50; and poe-
try: S i s t e r Mary Edwardine
O'Connor, $75; Keith Cox, $50.
Judges, selected from the staff of
the University, are announced aft-
er the contest closes. Further in-
formation concerning the contest
may be obtained from Prof. R. W.
Cowden, Director of the Hopwood
Awards, 3227 Angell Hall.
Dance Classes
To Be 'Given
Men who want to brush up on
the technique ofthe foxtrot, rum-
ba, tango or waltz will have the
opportunity at 7 p.m. Tuesday
when registration for dancing
classes will be held in the League
Ballroom.
Classes will be held every Tues-
day for six weeks, beginners meet-
ing at 7 p.m. and intermediate at
8 p.m. Enrollment will be limit-
ed to 75 men according to Sue
Montgomery, dancing class chair-
man. There will be a charge of
two dollars for the series of les-
sons.
John Guin, an Arthur Murray
instructor, will teach the classes,
Women may register as assistant
teachers on Tuesday night. Men
may also bring their own partners
Miss Montgomery said.

w::
.y
s ,
:y
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f:.::

yf4 t
t
me left), general counsel for the
'dy the effec tof the new Taft-
othe CIO executive board,
AL':.

Stress Need
For Guidance

Techninue UIse May End In New Stalemate

CIO LAWYERS STUDY NEW LABOR LAW-Lee Pressman (extren
CIO, and other CIO lawyers in a meeting June 26 in Washington, stu
Hartley labor law on CIO unions. The group will report June 27 to

Prof. Stidley
Will Present
Religious Talk
The second of a series of lec-
tures on "Current Religious Edu-
cation" will be givenat 4 p.n. to-
day in the Rackham Assembly
Room by Prof. Leonard A. Stid-
ley, a member of the staff of the
Workshop on Character and Re-
ligious Education.
Dr. Stidley is Professor of Re-
ligious Education at the Oberlin
Graduate School of Religion and
editor of "Religious Education".
He will discuss the problems con-
fronted by Judism and Christian-
ity, the central truths of these re-
ligions and the methods of pre-
senting them to children.
Dr. Stidley will lecture at 4 p.m,
daily through July 7. The lectures
are open to the public.
i

'MERRY GO ROUND'
.Paris Conference on Stability

'THE HUMAN POTENT

4r'

II

Psychologist Scores Human
Social, Emotional Inefficiency
Human efficiency realizes only Studies on character education
one-third of its emotional, social made by Dr. Ligon have been
and intellectual potential, accord- used as thegbasis for church
ing 'to Dr. Ernest M. Ligon, pro- schools of religion throughout the
ng to D . sylogat .ULigon, po-country. In these schools parents
fessor of psychology at Union Col- have undertaken experiments on
lege, Schenectady, N. Y. improving religious instruction.
Dr. Ligon discussed "the human Dr. Ligon's second lecture on the
potential" yesterday at the first general theme of "Attitude Goals
public session of the annual ten- in Religious Education" will be
day Workshop in Character and given at 8 p.m. today in Kellogg
Religious Education being held Auditorium. The lecture is open
here this week. to the public.
"We could do an infinitely bet-
ter job than we do," Dr. Ligon de-Doc Tells
clared. "To achieve that end is tLl
the job of character education,"
he said. Of Women'
Dr. Ligon emphasized that
"there are laws of character just
as there are natural laws" butJobs in Mexico
said that these laws must be dis-
covered, not invented. (Continued from Page 1)
Dr. Ligon is founder and di-
rector of the Union College Char- scurvy and pellegra, Dr. Gavitt
acter Research Project, now in its
14th year, which attempts to ap- declared,
ply the scientific method to the Water Often Polluted
Christian philosophy of character. Another problem is the drink-
Sing water, which is often obtained
Zionist Open House from polluted wells. The physi-
The University chapter of the cians must cope with dysentery,
Intercollegiate Zionist Federation typhoid and undulant fever.
of America will hold an open The Government sends a cer-
house from 8:30 p.m. to 12 to- tain amount of vitamins and
night at the Hillel Foundation. medications to doctors andknurses
The program will include danc- who distribute them to people
ing and refreshments. paying 24 pesos $5) a year. But

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Stressing the need for increased
use of guidance techniques, and,
at the same time, warning against
an overzealous faith in test find-
ings, leaders in the field of human
adjustments concluded their na-
tional conference on adjustment
measurement last night at Rack-
ham Building.
The conference, comprising six
sessions in two days, was spon-
sored by the University's Insti-
tute for Human Adjustment and
the Bureau of Psychological Serv-
ices. It brought to Ann Arbor
educators, psychologists and tech-
nicians from many parts of the
country.
Aims At Training
Dr. Jacob S. Orleans of the Col-
lege of the City of New York, look-
ing at the guidance program of
the future, declared that this pro-
gram will aim at training class-
room teachers in guidance meth-
ods.
"I can think of no group," he
added, "who are in a more stra-
tegic position to influence the ed-
ucational program or to make
dramatically clear the needfor
fundamental changes."
Danger signs were posted by
Prof. Harry N. Rivlin of Queens
College, New York, who warned
a g a i n s t emphasizing modern
achievement tests to the point
where the teacher regards the stu-
dent as merely "a collection of test
scores."~
Intelligence, Scholastic Tests 1
Prof. Rivlin called attention to
the many new techniques of test-
ing and the advent of intelligence
tests, scholastic achievement tests
and emotional and personality
tests.
For all of these to be adminis-
tered to advantage in the schools,
it is frequently necessary to have
them administered by specialists,
he pointed out.
Students!
5-T-R-E-T-C-H
your entertainment
dollar!!
PRICES
25c until 5 P.M.
30c after 5 P.M.
- NOW PLAYING -
Rob't Cummings in
"THE CHASE"
and
Cornel Wilde in
"BANDIT OF SHER-
WOOD FOREST"

By J. M. ROBERTS, JR.
AP Foreign Affairs Analyst
It begins to look as though the
Paris Conference on European
Economic Stability will take on
many of the aspects of the recent
Moscow Conference regarding
Germany.
If Russia's attitude toward in-
clusion of Germany in a contin-
ent-wide economy hinges, as sug-
gested, on what it means to her
reparations claims, then the for-
eign ministers will find themselves
back on a familiar merry-go-
round.
It can be taken as a matter o,
course that the United States is
not going to put while Russia
takes. There's been plenty of that
already, resulting from Russia's
unilateral interpretation of the
Potsdam agreement.
You can also safely assume that
the U.S. Ambassador to London,
Lewis W. Douglas, was not ex-
pressing a mere personal opinion
when he said that "economic re-
construction must rest upon con-
fidence in the stability of political
institutions," and that it is "ur-
gent that unilateral political acts
committeed either by states or
groups within states which dis-
turb confidence, encourage fear
- ---- ----

and foster economic disintegra-
tion, must come to an end."
All of this makes it even clear-
er than heretofore that, in order
to participate in any program
which will prove acceptable to the
United States, Russia would have
to make fundamental changes in
her general policies and practices.
Paul Martin
Donates Award
Establishment of the Paul J.
J. Martin Scholarship for a Con-
adian student to study at the Uni-
versity has been announced by
Dr. Frank E. Dobbins, assistant
to the president.
Funds for the scholarship, were
donated by Martin, Canadian
minister of national health and
welfare.
The scholarship, valued at $250,
will be assigned "on a basis of
need and superior scholastic abil-
ity," Dr. Robbins said.
HELD OVER

- ..1 .. . ... . .,. ..... .

4'

Continuous C
from 1 P.M. COOL !

l

-- Last Times Today -
EDDIE BRACKEN, r.
PRISCILLA LAN E
W TOM CONWAY

i

{ 1 V

- Coming Sunday -

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

I- i
(Continued from Page 2)
Paul Kauper of the University of
Michigan Law Faculty will be the
speaker. Sunday morning Bible
Hour will be held at the center,
1304 Hill Street at 9:15. Worship
services in Zion Trinity Luther-
an Churches will be held at the
usual hour of 10:30 p.m.

wow
K:F

'1

Popcorn Pete says:
Some visiting relatives are like fish - no good after
three days. But my brother, Popsicle Pete, will be
here, and welcome too, all summer.
(Popsicles, Choco-Pops and Dixie Cups Ge)
CARMEL CORN SHOP
621 E. Liberty St. - Phone 5975 - 21 Steps from State St.
THE FARM CUPBOARD
Specializing in FRIED CHICKEN DINNERS
Open 11:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. including Sundays.
5400 Plymouth Road (on the way to Detroit) Phone 9387
COTTAGE INN
Specializing in Home Cooked Food.. . Steaks and Chops
Open Weekdays 11:00 A.M. - 1:30 P.M., 5:00 - 8:00 P.M.
Sundays 11:00 A.M. - 2:00 P.M., 5:00 - 9:00 P.M.
Closed Saturdays 511 East William

+ Classified Advertising +
MISCELLANEOUS WANTED
WHIZZER MOTOR BIKES for rent by MEN BOARDERS at 548 So. State. Next
the hour or day. If you can ride a to Union. Call Dick Hadler, 2-4481. )5
bike you can drive a Whizzer. Bring
your driver's license, a $5.00 deposit FOR RENT
and anybody's girl friend to the FRRN
Mobilgas Station, South University at ----
Forest. )3 ROOM AND BOARD available for men
at the Chi Phi Fraternity House,
ALTERATIONS, custom-made clothes, 1530 Washtenaw Ave. Fine accommo-
remodeling of clothes. Prompt serv- dations. Near campus. Reasonable
ice. Hildegarde Shop, 116 E. Huron. rates. Call 4295 and ask for either
Phone 2-4666. Catherman or Morris. )22
SEWING, Alterations and refitting. ROOMS AVAILABLE for summer stu-
Miss Livingston, 315 S. Division, 2nd dents. Phi Rho Sigma Fraternity.
floor. )29 300 N. Ingalls, phone 2-5695. )21
LOST AND FOUND BOARD AVAILABLE for summer ses-
sion in campus cooperatives. Call
LOST: Lady Elgin watch. Jeweled black Bob Haefeli 7211. )30
band raised crystal. Lost between
Tappan and Hill. Name on back. Re- WANTED TO RENT
ward. Call 2-4514. )3I
C_______ _ 3-4 ROOM apartment, furnished or un-
HELP WANTED ; furnished for medical student and
wife. Sept. 1 or sooner. Call Te-
PART TIME display man. Must be cumseh 311 collect. )2
good show card writer. Phone 9216 DOUBLE OR SINGLE room wanted
for appointment. )14 near campus for fall semester and
ADVANCED SPANISH student as read- thereafter. Write Robert Ponitz,
er for blind student. See Randall 1524 Park Ave., Bay City, Michigan. )6
Nelson, Apt. 719, University Terrace
any afternoon. )23 PERSONAL
FOR SALE BEAUTIFUL HAIR is a priceless pos-
session. Keep it lovely with our na-
1941 DODGE SEDAN, heater, fluid turally soft silky permanents. Or if
drive, must sell. $750. Apt 1337 Uni- your hair is dull dry and lifeless get
versity Terrace. our proven treatments. Open eve-
nings. By appointment. DiMattia
U.S. AIR FORCE sun glasses. $3.50. Hollywood Salon, 403 S. Division St.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington St. )28 Phones 7561-5050. )27
Travelers Checks:
the smart way to carrys
money on your trip this
summer. They are insur-
ed to protect you against
loss.

because these things are scarce,
the people get them only when
they are too ill to work, Dr. Ga-
vitt said.

i=

The 19417
MICHIGF4NENSIfIN
offers a l imited number

of

C

opi

es

of-

the 1947
earbook

Uni*v

e

rsity

14

YOUR GUIDE FOR CAMPUS ACTIVITIES
twPICTURES OF THE SENIORS
~ SPORTS DATA AND PICTURES
too SORORITIES AND FRATERNITIES
MJ CH:'IC P NEN Sfl

I

11

GRANADA CAFE

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