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June 28, 1947 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-06-28

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P AY, JUNE 27, 1947

THE; MI1CHIGAN lDAILY

SATUTRDAY. ,fJUNE 2& 9i 1A1 T

I

riaa-avaaarra:a; uvi a: tiv, 1AYi

i

Barclay Wins Two Matches to Gain NCAA Golf Qua:

rter

-Finals

Brown Wins,
U.S. Advances
At Wimbledon
LONDON, June 27 -(P)- Tom
Brown, a San Francisco law stu-
dent, battled his way to the quar-
ter-findis of the Wimbledon Ten-
nis Championships with an up-
hill, five-set triumph today and
was joined in the round of eight
by. the men who met for the title
in this tournament a year ago.
The third-seeded Californian
outlasted Colin Long of Australia,
3-0, 13-11, 3-6, 6-1, 6-0, drawing
first blood in the celebrated duel
for international honors between
the ranking players of the two
countries now dominating the am-
ateu curts of the world.
Australian Wins
Australia, which had duplicated
the feat of the United States in
sending four men into the second
round of 16, also carved out a
berth in the quarter-finals, how-
Sever, when Goeff Brown, seeded
fifth, ousted French Davis Cupper
Pierre Pellizza, 6-3, 6-2, 1-6, 6-3.
of Defending champion Yvon Petra
of France rated no. 7 this year,
reached the round of eight by
turning back Jeff Robson of New
Zealand, 6-2, 6-3, 4-6, 6-3, despite
a spotty game and numerous
double faults.
Brown To Face Petra
Petra, who eliminated Tom
Brown in five sets in the 1946
semi-finals and then defeated
Geoff Brown in the five-set final
bout, will face Tom once more in
the next round.
Doubles favorites Jack Kramer
and Bob Falkenburg of Los An-
geles moved into the third round,
meanwhile, by sweeping through
Robert Abdesselam and Bernard
Destremau of France, 6-1, 7-5, 6-3,
and the second-seeded Australian
pair, John Bromwieh and Dinny
Pails, also came through.
Patronize Your
Student Book Exchange
THE L G. BALFOUR
STORE
"Your Official Jewelers"
Open every day -
Monday through Friday
1:30 until 5:00
Home of the Official
g, University of Michigan ring
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
1319 S. University Ph. 9533

M' Trackmen
To Run Today
On West Coast
Four Michigan trackmen will
compete in the Big Nine-Pacific
Coast dual meet today at Berke-
ley, Cal., and two of them are good
bets to come home winners.
Chuck Fonville, who is the Big
Nine and National Collegiate shot
put champ, is the favorite to win
his specialty, since he won the
collegiate title last week at Salt
Lake City with a heave of 54 ft.
10 7/8 in,, his best to date.
Wolverine Herb Barten, who is
the Big Nine half-mile king, will
compete in the "880" along with
his teammate, Chuck Low, who
took third in the Connference
championships. Barten won that
race in 1:52.9, and stands a good
chance of winning today. The
other Michigan entry is Alex Mor-
ris, two-miler who placed third in
the Big Nine meet.
The Michigan thinclads will
leave California after the meet
and travel to Lincoln, Nebraska
for the National AAU champion-
ships next Saturday.
Joe Louis Plans
To Retire in 1948
DETROIT, June 27-(P)-John
Roxborough, co-manager of
Heavyweight Champion Joe Louis,
said today the Brown Bomber
hopes to retire in 1948 and follow
Gene Tunney's example of quit-
ting the ring while still kingpin
of the heavyweight division.
"Joe is definitely committed to
defend his title against' the'best
possible challenger in Yankee
Stadium in September," Roxbor-
ough reported.
He indicated Joe's opponent
"will be named after July 15 af-
ter Joe Baski meets Ollie Tand-
berg in Stockholm July 6."
Louis, who recently celebrated
his 10th year as heavyweight
champ, arrived here today with
his softball team. He will go to
Chicago Monday to await the ar-
rival from Mexico City of Mrs.
Louis and his month-old son, Joe,
jr.
Diamonds
and
Wedding,
Rings
S 717North University Ave.
S 0<- ==5O< oyo-yN

SPORTSCRI BBLES
By ARCHIE PARSONS

OR THOSE w
anxious to tak
weather, I would
to the University1
legiate individual

l
.k

'ho like high-calibre collegiate athletics and are
ke advantage of the rarity of sunny Ann Arbor
suggest taking a stroll down South State Street
golf course where the finals of the National Col-
golf championships take place tomorrow.

For the past week, close to 300 of the best amateur collegiate
golfers in the nation have been battling it out over the tough
6,600-yard layout. Most of them are in agreement that this is
one of the hardest courses they have ever played, and the first
three holes will cause many of them to wake up screaming for
nights to come. One golfer carded a 13 on the no. 1 hole, while
another scored an11,
BUT DON'T THINK these boys can't smack that pill around smart-
ly. Such golfers as "Babe" Lind of Denver, third low amateur
in the Master's this year, Big Bill Campbell of Princeton, who won a
driving contest last Sunday with a 263-yard poke into a wind, Ok-
lahoma's Charlie Coe, and Michigan's own Dave Barclay are among
the best up-and-coming golfers this nation is producing.
The University has done a fine job as host to this meet.
There is a refreshment stand for those who want to battle the
heat with a coke or two, and a checking booth open all day.
If you don't care to follow the golfers around, there is a score
board right behind the tenth tee, and therein lies a tale.
THE BOARD was designed by a boy named Al Kimmel. Al and his
father make a vocation out of scoring for the public important
golf meets all over the country. His father just finished an assign-
ment at the P.G.A. in Detroit, and is on the job over at Chicago,
their home, in the Victory Open. I asked Al how they ever got into
such a peculiar job, but outside of saying that they began 14 years
ago, he merely commented that "it was just one of those things."
Well, it's a nice way to see the country.
Also handling the scoreboard and checking the golfers' cards
is an old face around Michigan athletic circles. He is the former
Wolverine golf coach, Bill Barclay, who is now handling Har-
vard's basketball and golf teams and doing a fine job. Bill came
out here for a vacation, but with golfers posting their cards about
every three minutes from dawn to dusk the first few days, he be-
gan to wonder if he had made a mistake.
THE PRESS TENT, just behind the score board, started out as quite
a rustic affair. Despite the telephones, telegraphs, typewriters, and
other momentos of the Technological Age, two hastily procured kero-
sene lamps which were used whin the tourney went on into the dark-
ness the first night, gave the place a slight air of the Simple Life.
While we are talking about golf, some congratulations are in
order. Ever since the days when most of the present Michigan
coaching staff was just a bunch of high school kids, Michigan has
won a Conference championship every year, but for the last two
years it has taken an 11th hour struggle by the Wolverine golf
team to keep the streak alive.
W HILE MOST OF US were settling down to the annual contest
with the books and professors on May 31, the golfers, led by
Ed Schalon, who tied for medalist honors, were coming from nine
strokes behind Purdue on the final day of the tournament to cut
themselves that all-important slab of Big Nine championship bacon.
Bert Katzenmeyer, who is finishing up his first year as the
Maze and Blue golf coach, has done a fine job, and no amount
of praise should be omitted for Messrs. Schalon, Courtright, Bar-
clay, Elliott, Ludolph, Kessler, and Jenswold. After all, Katzen-
meyer could lead them up to the tee, but they were on their own
after that.
This is one of the most versatile golf teams ever assembled any-
where. Courtright is a two-year captain of the wrestling team and a
former NCAA and Big Nine 155-pound champ, holding seven major
letters. Elliott captained the basketball team last season and plays
quite a bit of football on the side,, (he has won six letters in two
years), Jenswold is a former Wolverine hockey player, and Kessler is
one of Ken Doherty's crack two-milers during the indoor season.
Among them they have won 27 letters.

18 Tiger Hits
Whip Browns;
Yankees Wn
Dodgers Top Braves;
Giants, Cubs Lose
By The Associated Press
The Detroit Tigers, returning
home after a disastrous Eastern
road trip on which they dropped
10 out of 11 games, smashed out
18 hits today to wallop the St.
Louis Browns, 11-2, in a twilight
game called in the last of the
eighth because of darkness.
A shirt-sleeved crowd of 18,3301
fans saw the Tigers show a sur-
prising amount of power in tie
twilight gam.e.
Roy Cullenbine and Hoot Evers
hit for the circuit, Cullenb-ne get-
ting his seventh of the season in
the fifth with none on while Evers
got his fifth in the seventh with
none aboard.
Every Tiger hit safely but Mul.
lin, and Trucks was the winning
pitcher. Meanwhile Carl Sheib,
the Athletics' rookie pitcher,
suffered his first loss as the
league-leading Yankees whipped
the A's, 7-1, behind the eight-hit
pitching of Spud Chandler.
The Boston Red Sox dropped
further behind the Yanks by los-
ing to Washington, 3-0, as Mickey
Haefner shut out the Sox with
seven hits. The Senators have won
five out of seven from Boston this
year. Over at Cleveland, Bobby
Feller got his tenth win of the
season as the Indians whipped the
White Sox, 9-3. Feller's double,
driving in three runs in the sec-
ond inning, was the telling blow.
Cutting loose with a 15-hit at-
tack, the Brooklyn Dodgers beat
the Boston Braves, 8-5, to widen
their National League lead.
The New York Giants also fell
further behind when Skeeter New-
some's grand slam homer off Clint
Hartung in the second inning al-
lowed the Phillies to win, 6-5.
Walker Cooper, Giant catcher, got
his sixth homer in five consecu-
tive games, while the Giant infield
made five double plays.
The Pittsburgh Pirates man-
aged.to turn back a hard finishing
drive by the Chicago Cubs to win,
12-8, with Hank Greenberg smash-
ing his 12th homer of the season.
The Cards-Cincinnati results were
incomplete.

i

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Major League
Standings

Brooklyn ..........
Boston...... . .
New York ........
Chicago ..........
Cincinnati ........ .
St. Louis ..........
Philadelphia.......
Pittsburgh.........

W
36
34
32
31
31
30
2'7
24

L
26
27
26
31.
32
31
36
36

AMERICAN LEAGUE

GB
14
1?
4%
5
5
91/1
101E
GB
p''
5
6%
614
7
714
121,

New York....,..
Boston...........
Philadelphia
Detroit..........
Cleveland........
Washington .......
Chicago
St. Louis .........

M' Captain To Meet Campbell
Of Princeton in Morning Match

w
38
33
31
29
27
28
30
23

L.
25
27
30
30
27
30
34
36

Bears Rip Eli
In NCAA Tilt
KALAMAZOO, Mich., June 27--
()-After a story start, Californ-
ia's batters teed off on virtually
the entire Yale pitching staff to-
day to whip the Elis 17 to 4, in
the opening game of the colleg-
iate "world series"-the National
Collegiate Athletic Association
Championship.
A heavy shower, which broke
just at the scheduled starting time
and delayed the game 45 minutes
nearly ruined the Californians
and they were trailing 4-2 when
the weather cleared. But in the
seventh they began to hit Frank
Quinn's fireball pitching and from
there on it was all California's ball
game.
The Golden Bears belted Quinn
in the eighth to take a 6-4 lead
and they piled eleven runs across
the plate in the ninth after the
Yale ace had been lifted for a
pinch-hitter.
California pounded out 14 hits,
three of them by Lyle Palmer and
a lot of the benefit of four Yale
errors of record as well as several
mental lapses. After scoring three
runs in the first inning when Nino
Barnise couldn't control the wet
ball, Yale was checked with five
hits by lanky Dick Larner.
For that
Delicious Midnight Snack
Try
MILLER'S
Box Lunch
Golden Brown Chicken
or Fried Jumbo Shrimp
Home-Made Rolls
and Individual Pies
Call 2-7171
We Deliver
Anywhere, Anytime

By ARCHIE PARSONS
Dave Barclay of Michigan bat-
tled his way into the quartei -final
round of the National Collegiate
individual golf championships
which get under way at 9 a.m. to-
day, by virtue of a double win over
Oklahoma A&M's Warren Glosser
and Joe Moore of LSU on the Uni-
versity links yesterday.
His teammates, Pete Ellott,
Bill Ludolph, and Ed Schalon,
were eliminated in the match
play. Ludolph lost to Warren
MacCarty of San Jose State, 4
and 3, while Elliott dropped a
one-up heartbreaker to Charlie
Coe of Oklahoma University, one
of the favorites, in the morning
round. Schalon defeated Tony
Langan of Syracuse, 4 and 2, in
the morning, but lost out, one
up, to Lou Stafford of Oregon in
an afternoon affair that went
two extra holes before Schalon
was finally eliminated.
Barclay and Glosser were all
even at the end of nine holes in the
morning round, but the Wolverine
golfer went down one on the 12th,
won the 13th, was down again on
the 14th, and then won the last
last three holes with two pars and
a birdie. He finished with a 39-
37-76, and Glosser wound up with
the same figure.
Michigan's team captain from
Rockford, Ill., came back in the
afternoon to swamp Moore, 5
and 4, after being three up at
the end of nine, and thus earned
the right to play Big Bill Camp-
bell of Princeton, a hard-hitting
West Virginian, in the quarter-
finals today.
Elliott and Coe were tiedfat the
turn, Elliott won the 10th, Coe
captured the 12th and 13th, and
they were even again when Pete
took the 14th. The Wolverine went
ahead on the 15th, but the Trans-
Mississippi champ tied it up when
he sank a 35-foot putt on the 17th
green for a hirdie three. They
both had a chance for birdies on
the last hole, but Coe took his and

the match while Elliott was down
in five. Coe had a 76 while Pete
scored a 39-38-78.
Schalon won his morning
match with Langan after being
one up at the end of nine, while
Ludolph lost his to MacCarty
after being two down at the
turn.
Barclay disposed of Moore in
his afternoon round after th0
Southwestern golfer had whipped
Bob Harris of San Jose State, win-
ner of the medal cup just the day
before, and then Schalon sent his
match into extra holes when he
scored a beautiful eagle three to
win the 18th hole after being one
down.
Schalon had a chance to cop
the match on the 19th after
Stafford played his second shot
into a trap, but the Oregon
golfer who took a second to
"Smiley" Quick last year in the
National Public Links tourney,
made a beautiful recovery which
rolled within two feet of the pin.
Schalon's putt lipped the cup
and they halved the hole.
Ed's drive:on the 20th hooked
into the rough, while Stafford was
right down the middle. When Ed's
next shot also went into the rough,
it was just a matter of playing
out the hole.
"Babe" Lind of Denver and
Oklahoma's Coe hook up today
in what will probably be one of
the finest matches of the year.
Lind beat Howard Saunders of
Ohio State, 2 and 1, in the morn-
ing, and whipped MacCarty in
the afternoon, 4 and 3. Coe won,
5 and 4, over Bobby Gardner of
UCCA in the afternoon.
Bo Wininger of Oklahoma A&M,
the co-medalist with San Jose
State's Harris, was another victim
in the morning round when he
lost to Tom Lambie of Stanford.
The semi-final round will begin
at 2 p.m. today, with the winners
of the above four matches battling
for a place in Sunday's 36-hole
final.

II'II

M b

t'--

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

WING NIPPLE TOOLS are timple, fast, and accurate.
Threads are easily made on long pipe, short pipe,
close to a wall, and up to 150 angle per pair. Work
is right on the job and hours sooner. Used with pipe
vise and with rachets.
Most territories open to sales. Worldliness is ad-
junct and character is wanted.
Wing S. Laboratory, 123 Watera St., Grass Lake, Mich.

i

(Continued from Page 2)

at 7 p.m. The speaker
meeting will be Professor

for the
Charles

----- -

F !n

______ -_ - ._ - .. ,il

M

I

TO OUR PATRONS!
All Member Barber Shops
will be closed Saturday, July 5th,
in cooperation with fellow
Merchants.
The Ann Arbor Barbers Assn.
i?,aok & *?ecS dIlite4:
. .NEW RECORDINGS IN A LIGHTER
VEIN THAT YOU ARE SURE TO ENJOY
DURING YOUR SUMMER LEISURE . . .
MENOTTI-Sebastion, Ballet Suite
. . .Robin Hood Dell Orchestra, Mitropoulos
TCHAIKOVSKY-Serenade for Strings, Op. 48
..Philadelphia Orchestra, Ormandy
MENDELSSOHN-Piano Music{
.. Vladimir Horowitz
HANDEL-BEECHAM-The Great Elopement
...London Philharmonic Orchestra,
Beecham
DELIUS-Concerto for Violin and Orchestra

C. Fries who will talk on the
English Language Institute.
Churches
First Congregational Church
10:45 a.m.-Dr. Parr's subject
is "A Faith Big Enough."
6:00 p.m.-Student Guild. Cost
Supper. Dr. E. F. Barker will
speak on "Philosophy, Religion
and the New Physics."
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw:
Service at 11:00 a.m. Sunday,
with sermon by the Rev. Prof. W.
C. Kitzerow of Concordia College,
Ft. Wayne, Indiana.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club: Supper Social Sunday
at 5:15 at the Center.
The Lutheran Student Associa-
tion will meet Sunday at 5:30
hold open house Saturday, June
309 East Washington Street. Prof.
(Continued on Page 4)
ART CINEMA LEAGUE
PRESENTS

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
1304 Hill Street-Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
For National Lutheran Council Students
9:15 A.M.: Bible Hour at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Services in Zion and
Trinity Lutheran Churches.
11:00 A.M.: Worship Service in eChrist Luth-
eran Chapel, Willow Run-Rev. Robert
Boettger, Pastor.
5:30 P.M.: Meet in Zion Lutheran Parish
Hall, 309 East Washington St. Prof. Paul
Kauper of the Law Faculty, speaker.
4:00 P.M.: Wednesday - Tea and coffee
hour at the Center.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
The Rev. John M. Shufelt, Curate
The Rev. John H. Burt, Student Chaplain
Miss Maxine J. Westphal,
Counsellor for Women Students
Mr. George R. Hunsche,
Organist and Choirmaster
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
11:00 A.M.: Nursery and Kindergarten, Tat-
lock Hall.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by Dr.
Lewis.
5:00 P.M.: Canterbury Club Picnic and Dis-
cussion. Meet at the Student Center, 408
Lawrence Street.
Wednesday, 7:15 A.M.: Holy Communion
(followed by breakfast at Student Center.
Reservations, 5790.)

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
(The Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Mis-
souri, Ohio, and Other States)
Sunday at 11:00 A.M.: Service, with sermon
by the Rev. Prof. W. C. Kitzerow of Con-
cordia College, Ft. Wayne, Ind., "The
Greatest Division in the World."
Sunday at 5:15 P.M.: Supper meeting of
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student Club.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon, D.D., and James Van Pernis,
Ministers
Frieda Op't Holt Vogan, Director of Music
Ruth Kirk, Church Worker
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship with sermon
by Dr. Lemon. Topic: "Life in Head-
lines."
5:00 P.M.: Summer Program "As the World
Looks to a Historian." Address by Prof.
Preston Slosson. Discussion and Buffet
Supper follows at 6 p.m.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Ministers: James Brett Kenna and Robert
H. Jongeward
Music: Lester McCoy, guest choir director
Irene Applin Boice, associate organist
Student Activities: Kathleen M. Davis,
director
9:30 A.M.: Student Seminar. Pine Room.
10:40 A.M.: Worship Service. Dr. Kenna will
speak on, "Oh Master, Tread Our Streets
Again."4
5:30 P.M.: Wesleyan Guild. Supper and fel-
lowship hour. Summer series of The Com-
munity Workshop. Dr. Kenna will talk on
"No Time For Trifles."

dteteasO@ by Eavorite Firns Corp.

Be gdadyou have Two Feet!
Smartness is the reason for buying sports shoes.
So, get Nunn-Bush shoes . ... Ankle-fash-
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all /- Crr

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan

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:$

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